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What skis to get? [for ungroomed terrain in Colorado]

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I'm looking for a new set of skis. I currently have 00-01 Rossignol Bandits 177 cm.

I'm 6'3/200lb, 31 years old, and above average athletic. I ski in Colorado/out west. I usually spend most of the day on the backside of the mountain, in bowls or chutes and trees. Usually the only time I'm on the groomed stuff is just to head to the lift chairs. I'm pretty green in the ski department now a days and was just looking for some direction on where to go.

Thanks in advance. 

 

Mod note: moved to Ski Gear

post #2 of 12

Welcome.

 

There are a TON of answers to your question and as many questions. 

 

Skis have become much more specialized than they were 15 years ago but there are some great "do most things mostly well" skis too.

Also, Colorado/out west (I hate that term..."out west") is problematic.  Does "out west" include the Pacific NW? California? Utah? BC? Wyoming? Montana? or?   Or do you need one ski that does it all in all of these places because you travel around?  Heavy snow, dry snow, deep snow, hard snow?  If we focus on just Colorado, do you mean Vail or Silverton or Teluride or ?  When I hear "Colorado", I'm guessing you are thinking a ski that does well in 0-8" of new, light snow off-piste, no?

 

Are your Bandits XXX, XX or X?  What do you like/dislike about them?  

 

How good are you?  How many days per year do you usually ski?  I hate to be presumptuous and mean no offense, but the fact that you called them a "set of skis" and "lift chairs" and that you ski on your high school skis, you don't get out much and could use some lessons.

 

Not trying to be difficult but like Philpug says, "There are more wrong skis than there are bad skis now."  Also, a lot of people get skis for the conditions they wish they skied but only ski those conditions one out of 10 times and are on the wrong ski 9 out of 10.

 

Tell us about your boots which are likely the absolute first thing you should be upgrading.  At your height/weight, they should be a minimum of 110 in flex.  Search is your friend here.  Getting the right boot with the right fit is 75+% of the equation.  It wont matter what skis you are on if your boots are wrong.  Spend some time and money to get them right even if that means another year on the old skis.

post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

I realize there are a ton of options out there, which is why I was hoping for some direction on where to start.

So to me more descriptive of where I ski - yes in Colorado - specifically Steamboat, Aspen (mostly highlands), Breck, Keystone, Vail, Copper. Always wanted to go to Jackson Hole.

Typically I ski backside runs, steep trees in heavy snow. Obviously the amount of powder is dictated by the conditions. I'll ski in as much powder that's there. Usually hike up a little ways once a day or every other day. 

My Bandits are X. What I like about them - their ability to carve on-piste, which I don't spend hardly any time on. They seem pretty stiff on groomed runs, but I don't know anything different. Turning in trees seems to be easy.

 

What I don't like about them - basically everything else. No float in any sort of depth. Hardly ability to maneuver in thick snow. The reason I'm still skiing on my high school skis is because they were good skis at the time. Then I went to college and didn't have money to buy new skis, and have been able to rely on my athletic and skiing ability.

 

I've been skiing since I was about 12, every year between 5-15 days. Lately it's been about every other year due to scheduling conflicts. I don't need lessons.

 

I upgraded my boots about 5 years ago. They are 85 in flex, so yeah, I could probably use a new pair of boots also.

post #4 of 12

Wow.

After reading post #2, I was going to say UTG sounded grumpier than I. 

 

But after the last post - Where do we start? So much wrong there. The word quixotic comes to mind. 

Where I come from, the phrase "Pissing in the wind" would suffice.    

post #5 of 12

Yes you need boots when if not before you get the skis, for someone your size an 85 flex boot is the equivalent of a bedroom slipper. Most any of the 95-105mm skis would be where i would start. For your size, something in the 185cm length would be my reference starting size. I will start by suggesting one of the skis that had gotten a ton of accolades for next season, The Nordica Enforcer. 

post #6 of 12
The red ones are faster.
post #7 of 12

^^^^ This. But seriously, you have spectacularly mismatched skis and boots for what you say you like to ski and your size. I owned the Bandit X's, great ski for its time, still a wonder in bumps, but no way I'd want it in heavy backside conditions. Trees, maybe, if there were no new snow and lotsa bumps. And 85 flex boots, wow. 

 

OK, here's the program. I'd guess from the amount you've skied, per year, or every other year, that, uh, you DO need lessons. Badly, if you plan to go buy modern gear. Skis, for instance, have evolved so much since the Bandit X's that if you just step into a new pair you'll probably be searching for your ACL's for months. And as a mostly self-taught guy, skiing since age 3, I can testify that my style was bad mechanics and wonderful balance to compensate for all the other bad mechanics. I could ski most things, just not safely or efficiently. Lessons and/or racing are wonderful things, honestly. So:

 

1) Go buy some decent boots first. Something with a flex of about 110 minimum. Get them at a slopeside shop so you can have a good fitter and get them tweaked. The places you ski will have several reliable shops. Or do a search here for recs.

 

2) Rent some modern skis in the 95-110 mm range. 

 

3) Take a lesson on them.

 

4) Repeat (2) and (3).

 

5) Then look for deals on new skis after Christmas, or ideally, President's Day.

 

Good luck!

post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenyjoe View Post
 

I'm looking for a new set of skis. I currently have 00-01 Rossignol Bandits 177 cm. I'm 6'3/200lb,

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

Yes you need boots when if not before you get the skis, for someone your size an 85 flex boot is the equivalent of a bedroom slipper. Most any of the 95-105mm skis would be where i would start. For your size, something in the 185cm length would be my reference starting size. I will start by suggesting one of the skis that had gotten a ton of accolades for next season, The Nordica Enforcer. 

Listen to Phil, for sure some 110-120 flex boots and some 185ish skis.  And take Dino's word for it too.  I always buy the Red Skis if available.

post #9 of 12
The green skis are good this year too. smile.gif
post #10 of 12

Off the top of my head, I'd add the Rossi Soul 7 in 188. Covers a wide range of abilities and excellent in soft snow. I see a lot of them in rental fleets.

post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

The green skis are good this year too. smile.gif

Yes, but they will be even better when they ripen. 

post #12 of 12
Buy boots first.

Then an epic pass.

Then demo skis or borrow friends. Start where Phil said. Get through the season and look for sales after presidents.
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