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Rusty scrapers please

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

Help, my old scrapers are getting thin and I need to replace them. So who knows a source for carbon steel (i.e. NOT stainless steel) scrapers? You know, those beautiful ones that tarnish and actually work. Please save me from stainless hell.

Sam

Edge to Edge

Ski, Snowboard & Alpine Specialists

Mt Ruapehu

New Zealand

post #2 of 24

Try looking for them in in fine woodworking tool catalogs.

Not sure about what is available down under. 

 

Here one from Amazon.

 

Crown 20180 6-Inch by 3-Inch Rectangle Cabinet Scraper, 2-Set

 

Some of my best kitchen knives are high carbon steel. They are not shiny and pretty like the stainless ones. However, they sharpen up nicely and hold their edge exceptionally well. Way beyond what stainless steel one are capable of. The tactile feel on cutting is almost sensual compare to cold harshness of stainless. 

post #3 of 24

Lee Valley Tools (Canada) - http://www.leevalley.com/en/Wood/page.aspx?cat=1,310&p=41069 however they don't specify carbon or SS

post #4 of 24

And what is it you are using those scraper for?

post #5 of 24
Thread Starter 
I run a rental fleet and use them as part of a p-Tex base repair system.
post #6 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by sam clarkson View Post

I run a rental fleet and use them as part of a p-Tex base repair system.

I like this much better

 

http://www.fktools-us.com/Product-Details.asp?Part-Number=3370#thumb

post #7 of 24
Thread Starter 
Interesting, but I'll stick to my traditional blade.
post #8 of 24
Atomicman's suggest is the best, I use something similar for the work and it's fast and accurate, final touch up is the scraper if needed, and for a rental fleet not likely.

HOWEVER, in another tuning thread there is reference to an ultra thick scrapper.
post #9 of 24

Replacement knife blades (for box cutters or drywall knives) work for me quite well. They are cheap and available everywhere. Single edge razor blades are another reasonable tool at most hardware stores.  

 

But I don't have to repair ptex very often so I can tolerate a tool that is different to use. Plus I am really comfortable with those blades as I use them for so many other uses. There's always a sharp new one in the tool box.

 

Eric

post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post



HOWEVER, in another tuning thread there is reference to an ultra thick scrapper.

 

Yeh, the thickness and flex of a scraper doesn't really relate to how sharp a cutting burr you can put on it. 

 

OTOH pansar files are great for other projects - like trimming up plastic outlet boxes and outlet covers when installing LED lights to pick a random example :)

post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by sam clarkson View Post

Interesting, but I'll stick to my traditional blade.

Ok then!  Don't confuse me with facts, my minds made up! ;) :D

post #12 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

 

Yeh, the thickness and flex of a scraper doesn't really relate to how sharp a cutting burr you can put on it. 

 

OTOH pansar files are great for other projects - like trimming up plastic outlet boxes and outlet covers when installing LED lights to pick a random example :)

The problem with a regular panzer is you can't hold it and get it flat on the base....FK-SKS solved it with the tooll I posted. It really is the way to go, OLDSCHOOLSKIER hit the nail on the head!


Edited by Atomicman - 8/17/15 at 9:54am
post #13 of 24
Thread Starter 
@ cantunamunch...you never burr a ski scraper, that (excellent) trick is reserved for woodwork, not p-tex.
post #14 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post

HOWEVER, in another tuning thread there is reference to an ultra thick scrapper.

Yeh, the thickness and flex of a scraper doesn't really relate to how sharp a cutting burr you can put on it. 

OTOH pansar files are great for other projects - like trimming up plastic outlet boxes and outlet covers when installing LED lights to pick a random example smile.gif

The thickness was to prevent/reduce flexing and concaving the base. And from what I remember it was a high quality scraper.

@sam clarkson, the hook is also used on ski scrapers not only to add the edge but more importantly it also work hardens the edge giving you a longer edge life. I suspect some of your issues are not in understanding how various materials are sharpened and maintained. Some of these skills fall under old school secrets that are some times forgotten as most people no longer become masters in the old sense of the meaning. I have a full metal and wood shop and make whatever I need for tooling.

A lot of the advise given here is from very experienced tuners (a lot better than I and Atomicman being one of them), they are giving you the best answers.
post #15 of 24
Thread Starter 
Love your assumptions. I have vast experience spanning not quite 30 years in the trade. Currently running a fleet of 300 skis and 200 boards. I also have a strong background in engineering and know metallurgy. I have tried so many tools and toys. I do know what works in a production line type of base repair.
post #16 of 24
https://www.svst.com/
But really for retail:
http://www.race-werks.com/

They sell the Sandvik/Bahco tool steel scraper. Also available at many woodworking supply shops. They also sell an svst labeled model.

Svst also makes a unique 4mm thick tool steel scraper. It does not flex, or rather has an extremly small amount of flex. It is hollow ground like an ice skate blade. You might like it.
http://www.race-werks.com/svst-4mm-steel-base-scraper/

Also:
http://www.race-werks.com/sandvik-steel-scraper/
And:
http://www.race-werks.com/svst-steel-scraper/
Apparently less flexible than the Sandvik. Svst mobile website is god awful. Race werks is their retail outlet afai know.
post #17 of 24
Thread Starter 
I re-sharpen my scrapers by drawing them along a file set flat on the bench. I probably get about 30 seconds of scraping out of each (of 4) edges. So I'm back at the file roughly every two minutes. Usually three licks and I have a clean, square, sharp edge again.
Next ski....
post #18 of 24

^ One of the things I'm curious about is how these primarily north american suggestions might or might not work out for you.   I mean how much would the freight charge be to NZ?

 

Yesterday I was talking to someone in Alaska who couldn't get a can of marine varnish without an $83 freighting (barge) fee.

post #19 of 24
Well Sandvik/Bahco is most likely available down there. Svst i think has a distributor down there also. One would have to email them. That's a small outfit.
Lots of race teams head down there. There's likely to be someone.
post #20 of 24
Well a couple thing burnish the edges, wil harden the steel and increase life. Second consider a different steel for the scrapers. It will require grinding vs filing but longer life.

Finally seriously consider what Atomicman suggested as it will stay sharper a lot longer and taking into account sharpening time the ROI should be very quick. Only catch is that you will have to learn and adapt to something new.

Based on your own two comments I think you may have something still to learn in engineering, metallurgy and ski tuning as you seem to be doing it the hard way as 30 seconds per edge means a problem somewhere.

Sorry if the comment is hard but what you are saying doesn't add up.
post #21 of 24
Thread Starter 
Best you pop over tomorrow night and we share a beer and have a wee scrape-a-thon then...
Oh, I've tried harder blades. They suck.
Grind rather than file an edge? No thanks.
I could scrape way past the short duration I use. But that would be less efficient. Both in material removal and re-sharpening would be a bitch.
Like a butcher, a little re sharpen VERY often keeps a delicious edge. That's why I detest stainless.
post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by sam clarkson View Post

Best you pop over tomorrow night and we share a beer and have a wee scrape-a-thon then...
Oh, I've tried harder blades. They suck.
Grind rather than file an edge? No thanks.
I could scrape way past the short duration I use. But that would be less efficient. Both in material removal and re-sharpening would be a bitch.
Like a butcher, a little re sharpen VERY often keeps a delicious edge. That's why I detest stainless.

Love too, but the flights a little expensive.

Consider.

http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=20266&cat=1,330,49233

http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=32670&cat=1,310,41069

Both may help.
post #23 of 24


The traditional woodworking scrapers are usually made from 1095 Spring Steel. You would want the polished, not the unpolished surface.  This can be bought in various sized sheets and thicknesses. If you have a sheet metal shop near you that can sheer it, they could order it and you could have them make up the size and quantity and thickness you want. It should be cheaper than buying them individually. Good luck!

post #24 of 24

Carbon steel scraper.

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