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New Ski Recommendation [intermediate in KY, skis Indiana and Colorado]

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

Looking for some help in picking a new ski for the upcoming season. 5'8, 190 and a cautious skiier. Skill wise, stick to cruiser blues currently, but looking to make the jump this season with some more private lessons. Looking for a nice soft ski that is easier to turn. I like in KY, so the majority of my time is spent on the icy hills of Indiana, but do make a couple trips out to Colorado each year.

 

Looking for a ski/binding recommendation and what length I should consider?

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 24

Mod note:  Some background on the OP from Dec 2014.  Thread title updated a bit.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cdtotten View Post
 

I'm a 30 year old guy who just got into skiing last year. Ski locally in Indiana at our local man-made locations and did take a trip out to Breck last winter where I learned everything I know so far. Ski mostly greens and finally progressing to blues.

 

A friend of mine sold me his old K2 Mammoth Mountain (2011) skis w/bindings for less than $40 as I was getting tired of paying $30 to rent each visit, and I already had purchased boots at Surefoot when I was in breck, as I was having some problems with the rentals out there.

 

My question is, it seems like the skis are giving me more problems than they are helping, as they are much more difficult to turn in than the rental gear I have used, and the speed is very inconsistent, even after having them tuned and hand waxed by the shop at our local facility (which cost more than the skis).

 

I'm not an expert at all obviously, so just looking for a recommendation of a relatively inexpensive upgrade to the skis/bindings I have that would work for someone like me that usually skis out east on man-made snow, but occasionally travels out west, but sticks to the green/blue runs.


I appreciate any help people can provide.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cdtotten View Post
 

Honestly I haven't paid much attention to what they have given me for rentals. When my friend sold me his old ones, I did a quick check online and it appeared 160 was "ok", but looking into it more it does seem like these skis are pretty short.

 

Problem wise, I'm obviously not skilled enough to know if it's my lack of skill or the skis, but biggest problems I have are that at speed, they seem to lose some stability, especially when hitting even the smallest of ungroomed terrain, and when turning they don't slide around very easily compared to what I was getting out west.

 

That being said, I am skiing in what can only be described as very compacted, almost icy slush at night most of the time here. 

post #3 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdtotten View Post
 

Looking for some help in picking a new ski for the upcoming season. 5'8, 190 and a cautious skiier. Skill wise, stick to cruiser blues currently, but looking to make the jump this season with some more private lessons. Looking for a nice soft ski that is easier to turn. I like in KY, so the majority of my time is spent on the icy hills of Indiana, but do make a couple trips out to Colorado each year.

 

Looking for a ski/binding recommendation and what length I should consider?

 

Thanks!


How did the boots work out last season?

 

If you haven't already, check out the EpicSki Articles about ski length as a starting point.  (Click on Articles in the menu bar.)

post #4 of 24
Thread Starter 

Thanks for copying that over! Since that point I did get to take some great private lessons out at Steamboat and got another 25 days or so of skiing in, which helped a lot on the skill front.

 

One boot was pinching a little too much on the inside, but got it taken care of at Surefoot when in Steamboat. They were quick and got it fixed in no time, no questions. Just looking to purchase my first pair of non-beginner skis that I can grow with as my skills improve this winter.

 

Thanks!

post #5 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdtotten View Post
 

Thanks for copying that over! Since that point I did get to take some great private lessons out at Steamboat and got another 25 days or so of skiing in, which helped a lot on the skill front.

 

One boot was pinching a little too much on the inside, but got it taken care of at Surefoot when in Steamboat. They were quick and got it fixed in no time, no questions. Just looking to purchase my first pair of non-beginner skis that I can grow with as my skills improve this winter.

 

Thanks!


Can't help with ski recommendations since I'm a petite woman, but I remember clearly trying to figure out what to buy for skis when I started skiing about 10 years ago after skiing very little as a working adult.  Hopefully you'll get some recommendations soon.  Good for you on getting boots sorted out early on.

 

What split on days do you expect next winter?  50/50 Indiana vs Colorado?  Or more days locally?  My all-mountain skis (bought about 5 years ago after I could handle easier ungroomed terrain out west) are narrower than I would own if I only skied out west.  I rent when I'm lucky enough to catch a powder storm that drops > 6 inches.  That gives me complete flexibility to get as wide a ski as needed . . . and play around with options.  I also own a narrow ski for the Mid-Atlantic that I bought at a good price during the summer.

post #6 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdtotten View Post
 

Thanks for copying that over! Since that point I did get to take some great private lessons out at Steamboat and got another 25 days or so of skiing in, which helped a lot on the skill front.

 

One boot was pinching a little too much on the inside, but got it taken care of at Surefoot when in Steamboat. They were quick and got it fixed in no time, no questions. Just looking to purchase my first pair of non-beginner skis that I can grow with as my skills improve this winter.

 

Thanks!


Paging @Finndog , EpicSki Steamboat Ambassador

post #7 of 24

I think a mid-soft piste ski would be the best choice. Something that you can handle now, but that remains fun and stable once you get better...

 

Fischer Progressor 800 @ 170

Fischer Motive 80 @ 168 or 175 - this one is a bit more all-mountain, great on-piste as well

Head i.Supershape Rally @ 170

Blizzard Power 600 FS IQ @ 167 or 174

Dynastar CR-series

Nordica Fuel (2014 model), not sure what lengths were available...

 

Those would be on my demo list.

post #8 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

 

What split on days do you expect next winter?  50/50 Indiana vs Colorado?  Or more days locally?  

 

It will be likely 65/35. I have a season pass to our local "hill" (perfect north), and will probably hit there 20-25 days or so. I will also likely take two trips back out to steamboat, as I have fallen in love with that place. Total days there prob 10 or so.

post #9 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdtotten View Post
 

Thanks for copying that over! Since that point I did get to take some great private lessons out at Steamboat and got another 25 days or so of skiing in, which helped a lot on the skill front.

 

One boot was pinching a little too much on the inside, but got it taken care of at Surefoot when in Steamboat. They were quick and got it fixed in no time, no questions. Just looking to purchase my first pair of non-beginner skis that I can grow with as my skills improve this winter.

 

Thanks!

 

are you looking for a ski shop in Steamboat?  a great way to demo at steamboat is actually at the steamboat shop at the base and Yurt (mid-mountain) Steamboat Bike and Ski is my favorite shop and they are at the base (by One Steamboat across from Christys) Feel free to shoot me a PM or post up here with questions.  When are you going to be here?

post #10 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
 

 

are you looking for a ski shop in Steamboat?  a great way to demo at steamboat is actually at the steamboat shop at the base and Yurt (mid-mountain) Steamboat Bike and Ski is my favorite shop and they are at the base (by One Steamboat across from Christys) Feel free to shoot me a PM or post up here with questions.  When are you going to be here?

 

I have never demo'd skis, so wasn't sure how that worked or if it was an option. Looking to head back second or third week of December and then again in late February.

post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdtotten View Post
 

 

I have never demo'd skis, so wasn't sure how that worked or if it was an option. Looking to head back second or third week of December and then again in late February.

OK, easy enough!  Shoot me a PM.  I'll be happy to help you out.  

post #12 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdtotten View Post
 

I have never demo'd skis, so wasn't sure how that worked or if it was an option. Looking to head back second or third week of December and then again in late February.

When renting skis for a trip out west any way, the way to do a personal "Demo Day" is to rent demo skis instead of the standard deal.  That usually means getting skis from the current season.  By getting demo skis on mountain or at the base, it's relatively easy to change during the day.  Not too often, but still reasonable to try 2-3 pairs of skis in one day.  Needless to say, demo skis are usually in better shape than skis in a rental fleet.  If you are serious about buying skis, the demo rental fee can be put towards the price of a purchase.  Of course, if you buy skis on a trip then also need to think about how to get them home, which might mean buying a travel ski bag as well.

 

It's more common to demo skis during a vacation trip, then keep an eye out for a good price during late season or even during the summer.  One advantage of a late March ski vacation out west is that sometimes can get a deal on demo skis.

post #13 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
 

OK, easy enough!  Shoot me a PM.  I'll be happy to help you out.  


Will do as we get closer. You were terrific help on my last trip out there and am now hooked on the place.

post #14 of 24
Thread Starter 

Bumping this back up as I was offered a like brand new (2 days use) pair of Dynastar Powertrack 79 skis w/NX 11 bindings from a friend.

 

The skis are 173cm.

 

Would this be a good fit for my profile? He wants $200.00.

post #15 of 24

Hi

 

Sorry I cant give more precise advice (dont know much about the types of skis you search nor havesimilar stats to you), but I have some pointers:

 

* The ski is taller than you (a little bit). Are you comfy with that? Maybe its a tad bit too long and be annoying to maneuver at first (not impossible, and the rocker helps), but be sure to be 100% parallel, and dont wedge them in any condition

 

* It seems that is an intermediate-low-intermediate ski. Are you taking ski seriously? Can you see you outgrowing this ski?

 

* Im a bit afraid about the NX11 binding, as the max DIN would be 11, and I think you might be using about 7. Although this is not a dealbreaker

 

* This ski is in the soft end of the scale. I think it will be friendly, but if you hit frequent scary ice, I would like something with metal, a bit stiffer. Its definitely good for your technique, if you are taking classes

 

 

So, my very unscientific vredict is: it could work, but might not be the ideal planks for you, because of reasons (might outgrow them or the length thing)

post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdtotten View Post

Bumping this back up as I was offered a like brand new (2 days use) pair of Dynastar Powertrack 79 skis w/NX 11 bindings from a friend.

The skis are 173cm.

Would this be a good fit for my profile? He wants $200.00.


I'm just curious what runs do you ski at Perfect North and what is your comfort level and how is your technique on the tougher ones you ski?


Can you ski center stage with good form every time out?

How are you on bump runs like showtime especially when they are iced over at night?

I ski at perfect north 30 plus days per season and can try and help you gauge where you should be.

I am similar size as you and started skiing 3 seasons ago. I ski a blizzard magnum 72 iq. I would recommend getting something similar until you feel like you are able to keep good form. I ski a 160 cm model. It has done fine for me on trips to keystone, snowshoe and blue knob. A couple of the powder days at snowshoe made me decide to get a 85 width ski this year but I have skied enough to improve to a stiffer longer and wider ski.
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceCookie View Post

 

* Im a bit afraid about the NX11 binding, as the max DIN would be 11, and I think you might be using about 7. Although this is not a dealbreaker

 

I don't disagree with the other things you posted - but why do you think he's at 7? Did he post his BSL anywhere?

 

My DIN is 6.5, and I would not hesitate to use a binding with max DIN of 10 or 11. 

post #18 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post

I don't disagree with the other things you posted - but why do you think he's at 7? Did he post his BSL anywhere?

My DIN is 6.5, and I would not hesitate to use a binding with max DIN of 10 or 11. 

He didn't post the BSL, it's pure guesstimate. Still it's around there, lil bit more, lil bit less smile.gif
post #19 of 24
There is nothing wrong with the NX11 binding. At this point the OP is a type 1 skier so the highest his DIN can be is 7.5 and he would have to have a very small foot for that. We sold a lot of skis with those bindings last year and it's a good binding for beginners and intermediates. I do agree the PT79 is not the right ski for where the OP most often skis. I think something like a Head Rev 80 or a Fischer Progressor about 75-80mm would be a lot better.
post #20 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohioskier View Post


I'm just curious what runs do you ski at Perfect North and what is your comfort level and how is your technique on the tougher ones you ski?


Can you ski center stage with good form every time out?

How are you on bump runs like showtime especially when they are iced over at night?

I ski at perfect north 30 plus days per season and can try and help you gauge where you should be.

I am similar size as you and started skiing 3 seasons ago. I ski a blizzard magnum 72 iq. I would recommend getting something similar until you feel like you are able to keep good form. I ski a 160 cm model. It has done fine for me on trips to keystone, snowshoe and blue knob. A couple of the powder days at snowshoe made me decide to get a 85 width ski this year but I have skied enough to improve to a stiffer longer and wider ski.

 

I'm comfortable on all blue runs they have an only a couple times have tried center stage a couple times (and very cautious throughout). Haven't tried showtime.

 

Thanks for the tips... always nice to have someone rather local and similar size.

post #21 of 24
@cdtotten based upon what you ski at perfect north I would not classify you as intermediate blue skier. If you go west center stage is a blue. Don't waste your lone on some advanced mid fat etc. if I were in your shoes I would go with something like I have the magnum 72. It is plenty of ski to get you through now until you are skiing black diamonds comfortably and if you are skiing out west on groomers you will be fine. Only major challenge is if you are skiing in a huge powder day. For example I was at snowshoe and it snowed 14 plus inches one night and the morning was a bit challenging due to narrow ski but by afternoon it was all bumped up and my ski was awesome. Let's be really honest if you are at perfect north that issue won't ever come up. Here is a ski that would work for you

http://www.evo.com/outlet/ski-packages/blizzard-magnum-cross-iq-skis-100-tp-bindings-2012.aspx#image=94507/404180/blizzard-magnum-cross-iq-skis-10-0-tp-bindings-2012-150.jpg

I would probably buy the 155 cm version. In theory you probably would want something closer to 160 cm but for the price and where you are now shorter won't be a big deal. Especially with skiing at perfect north it's not like you have a need for a long ski that is stable for big long runs at high speed. That is definitely something that will be a lot of fun to ski where you normally ski. It is all you need to hit every run at perfect and have fun. I took my 7.2 version to Colorado and skied all the blues at keystone no problem.

If you do go to Colorado and get a huge snow day you can always rent bigger skis. You will see your ability go up a lot by skiing the 7.6 or narrower ski so that when you do go rent a bigger ski your technique will be there to really have fun. Just remember you ski man are hard pack and refrozen ice more than natural snow. Buy a ski that fits your home area.

Also look into the clinics and weekly lesson program at perfect north. You can really get improvement by doing them. They have some really good level 2 and 3 instructors there.
post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohioskier View Post

@cdtotten based upon what you ski at perfect north I would not classify you as intermediate blue skier. If you go west center stage is a blue. Don't waste your lone on some advanced mid fat etc. if I were in your shoes I would go with something like I have the magnum 72. It is plenty of ski to get you through now until you are skiing black diamonds comfortably and if you are skiing out west on groomers you will be fine. Only major challenge is if you are skiing in a huge powder day. For example I was at snowshoe and it snowed 14 plus inches one night and the morning was a bit challenging due to narrow ski but by afternoon it was all bumped up and my ski was awesome. Let's be really honest if you are at perfect north that issue won't ever come up. Here is a ski that would work for you

http://www.evo.com/outlet/ski-packages/blizzard-magnum-cross-iq-skis-100-tp-bindings-2012.aspx#image=94507/404180/blizzard-magnum-cross-iq-skis-10-0-tp-bindings-2012-150.jpg

I would probably buy the 155 cm version. In theory you probably would want something closer to 160 cm but for the price and where you are now shorter won't be a big deal. Especially with skiing at perfect north it's not like you have a need for a long ski that is stable for big long runs at high speed. That is definitely something that will be a lot of fun to ski where you normally ski. It is all you need to hit every run at perfect and have fun. I took my 7.2 version to Colorado and skied all the blues at keystone no problem.

If you do go to Colorado and get a huge snow day you can always rent bigger skis. You will see your ability go up a lot by skiing the 7.6 or narrower ski so that when you do go rent a bigger ski your technique will be there to really have fun. Just remember you ski man are hard pack and refrozen ice more than natural snow. Buy a ski that fits your home area.

Also look into the clinics and weekly lesson program at perfect north. You can really get improvement by doing them. They have some really good level 2 and 3 instructors there.

Excellent advice.
post #23 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohioskier View Post

@cdtotten based upon what you ski at perfect north I would not classify you as intermediate blue skier. If you go west center stage is a blue. Don't waste your lone on some advanced mid fat etc. if I were in your shoes I would go with something like I have the magnum 72. It is plenty of ski to get you through now until you are skiing black diamonds comfortably and if you are skiing out west on groomers you will be fine. Only major challenge is if you are skiing in a huge powder day. For example I was at snowshoe and it snowed 14 plus inches one night and the morning was a bit challenging due to narrow ski but by afternoon it was all bumped up and my ski was awesome. Let's be really honest if you are at perfect north that issue won't ever come up. Here is a ski that would work for you

http://www.evo.com/outlet/ski-packages/blizzard-magnum-cross-iq-skis-100-tp-bindings-2012.aspx#image=94507/404180/blizzard-magnum-cross-iq-skis-10-0-tp-bindings-2012-150.jpg

I would probably buy the 155 cm version. In theory you probably would want something closer to 160 cm but for the price and where you are now shorter won't be a big deal. Especially with skiing at perfect north it's not like you have a need for a long ski that is stable for big long runs at high speed. That is definitely something that will be a lot of fun to ski where you normally ski. It is all you need to hit every run at perfect and have fun. I took my 7.2 version to Colorado and skied all the blues at keystone no problem.

If you do go to Colorado and get a huge snow day you can always rent bigger skis. You will see your ability go up a lot by skiing the 7.6 or narrower ski so that when you do go rent a bigger ski your technique will be there to really have fun. Just remember you ski man are hard pack and refrozen ice more than natural snow. Buy a ski that fits your home area.

Also look into the clinics and weekly lesson program at perfect north. You can really get improvement by doing them. They have some really good level 2 and 3 instructors there.


Hey thanks for the reply again. I think its more of a product of not going with friends that ride those trails than anything else. Last time I was out in Steamboat, worked with an excellent private instructor and had no problem my 4 days there on any blues they had, including a couple ungroomed runs. I am definitely a timid skier, but that's just my nature with everything. I don't know if that changes anything, but thought I would point it out.

 

I'll check out those suggestions posted above. Thank you all for your great suggestions.

post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdtotten View Post


Hey thanks for the reply again. I think its more of a product of not going with friends that ride those trails than anything else. Last time I was out in Steamboat, worked with an excellent private instructor and had no problem my 4 days there on any blues they had, including a couple ungroomed runs. I am definitely a timid skier, but that's just my nature with everything. I don't know if that changes anything, but thought I would point it out.

I'll check out those suggestions posted above. Thank you all for your great suggestions.


Doesn't change anything on recommendation. The only reason you would need a bigger "expert" ski is if you had longer runs and picked up speed. Go with suggestion or get something similar around 160 cm and you will really enjoy it. When you are able to rip the blacks at north and elsewhere with more difficult terrain then upgrade to an advanced ski. The shorter carving ski will be a blast when you figure them out.

I'll be skiing at perfect north most days of the week so send me a message when you know your schedule and we can do a few runs.
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