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Jacket questions

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

I recently purchased a Patagonia down sweater jacket and a North Face shell.  I have never skied in colorado though I've heard it's cold (I normally ski in Sun Valley, ID) and I'm moving there next year (I'll probably be doing most of my skiing at Breckenridge and A-Basin).  Will my down sweater and shell be warm enough if I have a relatively heavy wool base layer on?  Thanks!

post #2 of 19

Maybe, maybe not.

post #3 of 19

Of course you'll be warm enough. Until you are not.

 

Welcome to Brecken-Fridge. :D  

post #4 of 19

When I used to ski places like Copper or A-Bay I often brought a patagonia puffy jacket (the synthetic one, not the down) in my backpack and sometimes I wanted it under my ski jacket.  If it was windy or extra cold I wore it.  If not, I didn't.  Sometimes it depended on whether I was skiing on the top of the mountain or the bottom.  I depends on how cold you get and how cold it happens to be.  But it's nice combo and should serve you well most of the time.

post #5 of 19

Colorado is utterly tropical compared to skiing in Canada.

 

Depends on your definition of "cold".

post #6 of 19
Welcome to epic ski!

I haven't been to either areas but I would bet you'll be fine. I have found with shells, it is easy to adjust what is under them and control your warmth that way. I have been able to wear the same shell with different combos underneath from warm spring days to stupid (why the F am I out here!) cold days and have been fine.

I have found that being able to regulate your heat via venting is key; close things up at the top of the run and open up in the lift line and chair ride as needed. You need to be able to let the heat out as well as keep the cold out.

If you do some searching around here, you will find enough posts to keep you busy through the summer on staying warm.

Ken
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnerbob View Post
 

Colorado is utterly tropical compared to skiing in Canada.

 

Depends on your definition of "cold".


Yeah and it depends on the person.  I seem to sweat a fair bit when I ski or whatever reason.  Working harder, outta shape..dunno.  So I can usually get by with a base layer, fleece and shell in all but the coldest conditions.  Others want heated vests!  So it depends I think.

post #8 of 19

Probably.

 

I've got a synthetic micro-puff that I wear under a shell on cold days at Loveland. Also have a 800 weight down that I'll wear with a base layer and fleece for brutally cold days.

 

Actually, cold and brutally cold pretty much sums up the full spectrum of mid-winter conditions at the Luv.:rolleyes (last year was an anomaly)

 

Do you have venting options on both the shell and the down sweater? I find those can extend the comfort range by 10-20 degrees. YMMV

post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradt10550 View Post
 

I recently purchased a Patagonia down sweater jacket and a North Face shell.  I have never skied in colorado though I've heard it's cold (I normally ski in Sun Valley, ID) and I'm moving there next year (I'll probably be doing most of my skiing at Breckenridge and A-Basin).  Will my down sweater and shell be warm enough if I have a relatively heavy wool base layer on?  Thanks!

 

The risk there (other than the implicit ones of you get cold at altitude/you get cold when your face-neck is in the wind/precip)  is that your shell is simply not windproof enough and that you will give yourself a good sweat trying to fix that with a heavy base layer.    The base of both of those mountains, heck, even the base of the T-bar is  balmy in comparison to the top.    And we all know what happens to sweaty people when chilled. 


I said risk because we really don't know.    With proper accessories for face and neck the risk is even lower.    Otherwise, your combo sounds fine, you might even want a lighter base layer if you're lower down or working bumps. 

post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MT Skull View Post

 

Do you have venting options on both the shell and the down sweater? I find those can extend the comfort range by 10-20 degrees. YMMV

I have venting in both my jacket shell and my ski pants, but not necessarily in my down sweater jacket.  I guess I could always unzip the down layer or replace it with my lightweight fleece if I started to get sweaty.

 

 

And thanks everyone else for the help! It looks like I'm just going to have to try it out and risk freezing for a day or two :)

post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradt10550 View Post
 

I have venting in both my jacket shell and my ski pants, but not necessarily in my down sweater jacket.  I guess I could always unzip the down layer or replace it with my lightweight fleece if I started to get sweaty.

 

 

And thanks everyone else for the help! It looks like I'm just going to have to try it out and risk freezing for a day or two :)

Yeah, and I apologize for my flippant answer, but it really does depend on far too many things. People just run different temps, and like to dress differently. You'll figure it out soon enough. 

post #12 of 19
On cold days I wear a Patagonia down sweater and a Patagonia Powder Bowl shell. My base layer varies but is most often a Patagonia R1 pullover. I stay warm even at 0F.
post #13 of 19

To segbrown's point, ski lots so that you can dial it in.

 

I ski mostly at Breck, and mostly upper layers are a wool base layer (Icebreaker 200), a fleece, and a windproof shell. Emphasis windproof - it's an Arc'teryx and is actually windproof, something most shells only aspire to. On chillier days, I wear a puffy vest. Rarely if ever do I break out a full-on puffy long sleeve - as you mentioned, it's too hard to regulate when it inevitably gets too hot after the first run.

 

It also depends on your skiing proclivities. If you are going to spend a lot of time on chair 6, Independence, T-Bar, or Peak 6, you MUST MUST MUST find a way to block that wind. Breck's temperatures are rarely the problem - it's the wind. And make sure you have a good system for your face - I've gotten white spots from frostbite just riding up the T-Bar. But last season, I really had my layers dialed in, and a new shell that had the perfect neck design to go with my goggles, and I didn't have any problems. If you aren't up on those lifts, you won't be all that cold.

post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradt10550 View Post

I have venting in both my jacket shell and my ski pants, but not necessarily in my down sweater jacket.  I guess I could always unzip the down layer or replace it with my lightweight fleece if I started to get sweaty.


And thanks everyone else for the help! It looks like I'm just going to have to try it out and risk freezing for a day or two smile.gif

When I wear a liner (Patagonia nano puff) under my shell, unless it is crazy cold, I don't zipper much past my belly. The nano puff doesn't have pit zips either.

Make sure you're wearing something that wicks sweat away as the first layer too.

One of the problems in maintaining comfort while skiing, especially if you tend to ski hard, is you have to actively work at it. I'm constantly unzipping then zipping back up in concert with what I'm doing, or actually what I just did. Build up heat then let it out. After the heat is out, hold what is left in and prevent wind, cold and snow or rain from getting in. Because of this, and the fact I wear mittens, I added a longer pull tab to the zippers I use. Made it much easier.

Ken
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post
One of the problems in maintaining comfort while skiing, especially if you tend to ski hard, is you have to actively work at it. I'm constantly unzipping then zipping back up in concert with what I'm doing, or actually what I just did. Build up heat then let it out. After the heat is out, hold what is left in and prevent wind, cold and snow or rain from getting in. Because of this, and the fact I wear mittens, I added a longer pull tab to the zippers I use. Made it much easier.

Ken

 

My favorite recent discovery for temperature control is a good hood. I used to think hoods were useless because I can't stand them while skiing - they limit my peripheral vision too much. I also can't stand anything in front of my mouth and nose while skiing - it feels like I can't breathe. But now I pull the hood up and zip the chin up whenever I get on the lift, and pull it down once I'm at the top. It's amazing how much warmer I am without risking sweat. I'm never cold while actually skiing - it's the lift rides that get to me.

post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 

 

My favorite recent discovery for temperature control is a good hood. I used to think hoods were useless because I can't stand them while skiing - they limit my peripheral vision too much. I also can't stand anything in front of my mouth and nose while skiing - it feels like I can't breathe. But now I pull the hood up and zip the chin up whenever I get on the lift, and pull it down once I'm at the top. It's amazing how much warmer I am without risking sweat. I'm never cold while actually skiing - it's the lift rides that get to me.

Yes yes yes. Hoods add 10 degrees or more, especially in wind. 

post #17 of 19


And despite marketing claims to the contrary, very few hoods are truly helmet compatible. Try before you buy.

post #18 of 19
I think on many days you'll get hot or not have versatile enough layers if your only insulating layers are the heavy wool or the down. You need to buy my Mammut midlayer for $100 so you have options. It's one of these. http://www.backcountry.com/mammut-eigerjoch-light-insulated-jacket-mens
post #19 of 19

nice :)

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