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Trying to piece together the quiver

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

As the title says, trying to put together the ski quiver for this upcoming season.  I have a pair of Dynastar Contact 4x4 that still have amazing life left in them and they are my go to ski on hard pack days on the East Coast.  What I am trying to figure out is the rest of the quiver for the couple of weeks we are able to spend on the West Coast.

 

I think I am fairly set on picking up a pair of the ON3P Billy Goats.  Big question is what to get in the middle.  There is a great sale right now on Moment skis and I was looking at both the PB&J and the Belafonte.  Any thoughts on which one would be best to round out the quiver?

post #2 of 8

That is great you are still getting life out of the Dynastars.  Heard real good things about the Billy Goats and I lusted after them for a while.  I have a pair of Moment skis the Jaguar Shark.  The PB&J is a more versatile ski and the Belafonte is more of a charger.

 

 

So the question is: What conditions are you imagining this third ski will be used in that you would want it rather than the other two?

post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

For the third ski I guess I am trying to solve this problem.  Heading on a West Coast trip and it hasn't snowed there in a few days.  There is a chance of 3-6" for 2 days in the middle of the trip.  What is going to be the best ski for that set of conditions?  Basically will I be better off on the Belafonte or the PB&J.?  If I go with the PB&J I miss out on a bit of hard charging the first few days but it would probably be better after the storm with some soft snow and bumps around.  But the Belafonte is going to be better on the harder stuff and one the fresh snow gets tracked out.  

 

I also live on the East Coast so will see more firm days than soft snow days so will need something to play around in the hard bumps over here as well.

 

Think I am leaning towards the PB&J which might be a bit turnier and more compliant since I have the Dynastar for real hard pack.

post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by connel20 View Post
 

For the third ski I guess I am trying to solve this problem.  Heading on a West Coast trip and it hasn't snowed there in a few days.  There is a chance of 3-6" for 2 days in the middle of the trip.  What is going to be the best ski for that set of conditions?  Basically will I be better off on the Belafonte or the PB&J.?  If I go with the PB&J I miss out on a bit of hard charging the first few days but it would probably be better after the storm with some soft snow and bumps around. 

 

There will be plenty of semi-hard bumps around in the West both prior to the hypothetical storm and afterward.     Since that is on your radar in the East, it might help you to reduce your criteria to 2:  good for you in hardish bumps  and doesn't get tossed around by chunky mashed potatoes.

 

post #5 of 8

A middle ski for the east really does't need to be much over 90mm underfoot (95mm if you are a BIG guy). In your tighter trees and narrower trails, you still need some nimbleness.  Again, how tall are you, what do you weight, how aggressively do you ski, where do you usually ski (mountain and terrain), and what are your expectations? With out that, any specific suggestion is just a pure guess. 

 

*edit-reread thread and sow he was looking for a MIDDLE ski. 

post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

A middle ski for the east really does't need to be much over 90mm underfoot (95mm if you are a BIG guy). In your tighter trees and narrower trails, you still need some nimbleness.  Again, how tall are you, what do you weight, how aggressively do you ski, where do you usually ski (mountain and terrain), and what are your expectations? With out that, any specific suggestion is just a pure guess. 

 

*edit-reread thread and sow he was looking for a MIDDLE ski. 

I fixed that for you, great advice. (now)

post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the help everyone.  I am 6'4", 210#, ski aggressively, don't spend much time in tight trees and no time in the park.  If given the choice I am skiing through some fluffy crud and small bumps on the side of the trail rather than arcing big turns down the middle of it.

 

I have also made a decision that no matter what I buy I want it to be Made in the USA....hence the names of the skis I mentioned earlier.

post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by connel20 View Post
 

Thanks for the help everyone.  I am 6'4", 210#, ski aggressively, don't spend much time in tight trees and no time in the park.  If given the choice I am skiing through some fluffy crud and small bumps on the side of the trail rather than arcing big turns down the middle of it.

 

I have also made a decision that no matter what I buy I want it to be Made in the USA....hence the names of the skis I mentioned earlier.

Paging @whiteroom and @Drahtguy to the white courtesy phone. These are two bigger guys what can give you a good idea. 

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