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Choosing a fat ski for japan - Page 2

post #31 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

 

I thought Vector Glide was made by Ogasaka - hence little overlap in the ski lines.


Well then there you go!  :)  Ogasaka's always been their race and tech ski brand... and Rexxam boots. Good boots, but again, expensive.

post #32 of 40
Thread Starter 

I've been researching based on all your awesome recommendations. And I am no closer to making a decision. I also emailed a bunch of rental shops in Japan but received no answer. There are some crazy good deals tho

 

ski                               yr        length         gms
DPS 112RP Pure     2014     184             1835
$740 US
 
Dynastar Cham 117     2015     180     2062
$552 US
 
Line Sir Francis Bacon     2015     184     2123
$389
 
Can anyone tell me how these skis feel compared to armada's TST? (which I did ski last year)

My problem is that I really do not know what to expect the ski to do for me because the conditions are so foreign. My feet, muscles and body do not have much 'memory' of what works for me. I know that I didn't like Armada TSTs because compared to fischer ranger 96 and mx 83 kastle, they felt like noodles on the snow we have out here. But when I got into a few powder stashes, the castles sank and trying to carve only resulted in instant falling. The snow on top and around them hampered turning and the softness of the snow underneath them did not give enough support for the edges to carve against. They submarined and rapidly decelerated. The TST at least floated some but there was none of that 'rebound'  out of a turn. I couldn't lean forward into them and expect the shovels to bite nearly as well as I expected. The fishers were great for what we had - powder for a few hours and crud the rest of the week. I assume the same will happen in Japan. A few days of pow(when we're touring) and many more days of crud. And maybe we'll get lucky and get a dump but with my luck I am not expecting it.

 

As for length, my fishers are 178 and I can manage it in the trees. And it already has a good bit of rocker. So I hesitate to go 190. The dps seems about the right length- dunno whether the RPC would be better. I am not anticipating lots of touring maybe a couple of hours a day of skinning on the days we do go.

post #33 of 40
If you like the tst, why not a JJ?
post #34 of 40
Niseko does get pretty tracked out nowadays but there are cat tours and of course self propelled backcountry so you can get fresh tracks, subject of course to snowfalls. And yeah, the classic Niswko micro climate delivers regular dumps of fresh snow, but not every year or week is "typical".

I personally don't think uber wide skis and a "porpoising" powder technique go hand in hand. For me at least the extent of porpoise involved diminishes as skis get wider. Like you I like a bit of remnant porpoise in my powder skiing. So I ski 100mm underfoot skis. As you head wider (which is what you have in mind)!you are increasingly riding the pow, not diving in and out of it. Your call.

I'm not sure what you mean about bending the tip to start powder turns. I'm pretty sure I don't do that but I'm also not a powder expert.

Anyway I personally think if you are choosing a particularly wide ski then you should accept it is prioritised for powder, choose a ski which will ski powder like you want to ski it, and be done with it.
post #35 of 40

Take your Rangers and you'll be fine most of the time; if there's a real dump just rent something 115-125 underfoot for the day. I'm pretty sure you can also rent a touring setup right in the resort at either Niseko or Hakuba. Don't (as someone here said) overthink it; it ain't rocket science.

Last January Niseko got plenty of snow, but it also got warm spells and sunshine between storms, so the powder quality wasn't up to usual standards -- I spent more days on my Hell&Backs than on my Praxis Protests, even going outside the gates. Also, there are usually plenty of used setups for sale cheap at several of the shops in the resort if you get the powder bug.

post #36 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmck3780 View Post

Niseko does get pretty tracked out nowadays but there are cat tours and of course self propelled backcountry so you can get fresh tracks, subject of course to snowfalls. And yeah, the classic Niswko micro climate delivers regular dumps of fresh snow, but not every year or week is "typical".

I personally don't think uber wide skis and a "porpoising" powder technique go hand in hand. For me at least the extent of porpoise involved diminishes as skis get wider. Like you I like a bit of remnant porpoise in my powder skiing. So I ski 100mm underfoot skis. As you head wider (which is what you have in mind)!you are increasingly riding the pow, not diving in and out of it. Your call.

I'm not sure what you mean about bending the tip to start powder turns. I'm pretty sure I don't do that but I'm also not a powder expert.

Anyway I personally think if you are choosing a particularly wide ski then you should accept it is prioritised for powder, choose a ski which will ski powder like you want to ski it, and be done with it.

I'm guessing the cat skiing was over at the old Weiss resort?
post #37 of 40

Without reading very far into this thread (so excuse me if this has already been mentioned)… The first post by whiteroom pretty much nailed what you should be looking for IMO. 

 

 

I think the Automatic 117 would suit you very well. My uncle, who is 54 and never been on a ski over 100mm, tried them out west this year and liked them enough to keep them for the whole trip. They are very easy to ski at their width and are extremely maneuverable. I think they would also make a great EC tree/pow ski..

 

 

 

I also can't help but say look at some of the micro companies. The Praxis Protest has been regarded as one of the best pow skis out there and they are still running their custom ski summer sale. I would definitely give that a look if I were you. And if you have questions you can directly email the CEO and get insight from someone who genuinely wants to hook you up with the right ski. 

 

 

 

 

Edit to add: Unless you are smaller (think <170lbs) I would not recommend the SFB for Japan. Great, great ski, but you will have floatation issues skiing deeper pow.

 

 

This may also be a good resource for you:

http://blistergearreview.com/index-ski-reviews-sorted-by-type

post #38 of 40
Markomyeah Weiss and I think there is at least one other set up, but I'm not sure where the others operate from.
post #39 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmck3780 View Post


I'm not sure what you mean about bending the tip to start powder turns. I'm pretty sure I don't do that but I'm also not a powder expert.
 

 

Pop over to the 'oversteering' thread in Instruction - that's what he's trying to do in powder - very different from the pedaling type centered weight transfer we were all doing ~5 years ago.   

post #40 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmck3780 View Post

Markomyeah Weiss and I think there is at least one other set up, but I'm not sure where the others operate from.


Interesting... honestly, I'd advise anyone to do a proper tour of Yotei or laps on Iwao, or the ridge behing Chisei... Weiss is pretty flat, and well.... it just isn't very interesting terrain.

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