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JF Beaulieu / Reilly McGlashan / Paul Lorenz Collaboration - Page 2

post #31 of 44

Please help me understand what's going on...

 

The turns in the Project Kitz vid are so incredibly fluid, they almost appear as if the skiers are motorcycles on a banked series of S turns, or roller coaster cars locked onto a series of snaky, banked track. In other words, tails following tips, absolutely. But if you look closely from behind you will sometimes (often?) see the tails of the skis leave the snow and pivot over to the other side, even if from the front it appears the tips of the skis stay engaged and smoothly go from one carve to another with almost imperceptible time spent in the flat/neutral phase of the transition.

 

Some active foot steering to complete the turn is one thing, but the very ideas of trampolining from one side to the other and managing pressure to control the rebound implies that there will be a check, or edge set, or whatever you want to call it, otherwise what would you rebound off of? If you didn't have the check you would either continue to move through the carved turn (like a roller coaster car) or skid out (fly off the track). And it seems that during the rebound sometimes they are hopping from one set of edges to the other, (courtesy of steering in between to set the new angle), and sometimes there's simply a pivot around the tips.

 

Do I have it right, or ??

post #32 of 44

Strangely, if you buy the video, they talk about much of this... but to answer your question... not really.

post #33 of 44

Not really :)

 

They are carving outside ski to outside ski. When the snow is soft and you ski at huge angles like these, there may not be a very definite "edge lock" in the same sense that you would get on ice. However, the edges engage well and the ski performance is there. A lot of it. Pivoting tends to kill ski performance, as it tends to dis-engage the edges.

 

As to how the "impulse" is generated - when you execute a good turn like these, there is tremendous energy created as the skis bend and turn. The more the skis bend and the more they turn, the higher the energy. The release is the process by which you manage this energy and use some to create this impulse or just waste it.

 

They talk about timing the release in the video, specifically in this context ! Also about the mechanics of creating these angles, with flexing the inside foot, staying low, etc

 

They are not hopping - maybe it looks like that, but they are absorbing a lot of that energy and use just a part of it, to "impulse" the body and/or skis across.

post #34 of 44

I really admire all the skiing in the Project Kitz video, and feel like it was a very worthwhile purchase from which I will benefit.

 

And I honestly don't want to muddy up this thread, but I would be interested in some further discussion on these topics. If you're game maybe we could pick that up here.

post #35 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakespapa View Post

One of my teachers, who'd skied with the unnamable H, said that even with that crew, steering is a thing, though unmentioned — steering that happens through the arc is not pivoting, he said.

You talking about Henry, the notorious examiner from PSIA Central? Yeah, his terminology is a bit nonstandard, but he's huge on steering and rotary in all forms. Best have your deep slush pivot slips dead on with him.
post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharpedges View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakespapa View Post

One of my teachers, who'd skied with the unnamable H, said that even with that crew, steering is a thing, though unmentioned — steering that happens through the arc is not pivoting, he said.

You talking about Henry, the notorious examiner from PSIA Central? Yeah, his terminology is a bit nonstandard, but he's huge on steering and rotary in all forms. Best have your deep slush pivot slips dead on with him.


Actually, no. I was being coyer than that. The Unnamable H is the Even Less Namable HH — a declared anti-steerer.

post #37 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakespapa View Post


Actually, no. I was being coyer than that. The Unnamable H is the Even Less Namable HH — a declared anti-steerer.

Oh, him. He eschews steering in all its forms. He has an old soccer knee injury that complains if he steers. Pain is a pretty strong incentive to avoid steering.
post #38 of 44

As mentioned previously I did purchase the Project Kitz video on Vimeo, and have watched it all the way through a few times. The skiing is great, as are the discussions of technique. Early season while it's pretty much groomers I've been focusing on the short turns sections - between the three skiers they have five on-snow drills. Would be interesting to discuss them (and other Project Kitz content) here, but I'm not sure how they'd feel about that. I did however want to mention something I've done which has been useful for me.

 

Using an iPhone I shot my tv screen and captured five short video clips of the drills. When I play back a clip I can pause it and then swipe with my finger to move back and forth through the frames at whatever speed I like to get a good view into the skier's motion. The granular playback control and having each drill in its own little clip makes it easy to access and user friendly - nice to watch on a gondola or chair ride up just before skiing down.

 

I like this idea of developing chunks of instructional content and making it available for a modest fee online with the option of downloading. Hopefully we'll see more of this over time.

post #39 of 44

Again - awesome video and instruction there! Well worth watching tens of times and begging for more next season!

Quote:

Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post

 

I like this idea of developing chunks of instructional content and making it available for a modest fee online with the option of downloading. Hopefully we'll see more of this over time.

 

Indeed, great idea... hmm... if only someone had created a website filled with expert skiing topics and sessions, photos and videos... hmm... ;) 

post #40 of 44

Does anyone know if these guys are using rockered carving skis? They are all exhibiting super smooth short turn retraction transitions that seem somewhat indicative of similar such benefits.

 

Regardless of whether, it would still be nice to know which tools they prefer for turns like this. Maybe the standard 165 SL full race model or the next step down?

 

 

post #41 of 44

JF is using one of the Rossi FIS SL models, which have tip rocker. Reilly and Paul are using a Volkl SL which may or may not have tip rocker depending on the model.

post #42 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by razie View Post

 

Indeed, great idea... hmm... if only someone had created a website filled with expert skiing topics and sessions, photos and videos... hmm... ;) 

 

Yup, certainly no shortage of goods here - just need to know how to use the search function, find the signal amongst all the noise. "Bob Barnes" seems to yield quality results.   ;-)

 

And a nice collection of clips from MrSnowPlow here if you need to feed your addiction to dynamic skiing...

 

http://www.paullorenzclinics.com/#!videos/cttn

post #43 of 44

Oh, this is so much fun.  Ski Dubai with Lorenz.  An interesting shopping mall skiing experience.

post #44 of 44

Ha, that's the first one I looked at as well! How very, very strange!   ;-)

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