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post #31 of 35

All good advise here.  My 2 cents would be to look for a seasonal rental for your kids.  Many shops offer this for growing kids and is more cost effective (and less time consuming) than renting each time that you go skiing.  For yourself, I can't agree more that good fitting boots will make your skiing that much more enjoyable -- I am a poster child for investing in an appropriate boot with an excellent boot fitter.  And properly fitted boots with alignment and foot beds will help your skiing advance.  BUT:  your first year back on skis may result in a bit of a learning curve -- not only in what is new (or newish) with the sport, but in what types of skiing you like to do and what kind of equipment you will want to use. Unless you have the money to invest in quality boot fitting (quality services tend to translate into retail prices, and ultimately this is, oh, so worth it), I would propose dipping your toes into the waters and buy a second hand boot for cheap money, and play around with it in order to give you a better idea of what we are all talking about here.  Then, IMHO, you will be better educated for the single most important equipment purchase in your skiing career...

post #32 of 35
Thread Starter 

So, purchase some second hand boots vice renting? I called the local Air Force base and they have some rental equipment there that is much more cost effective than renting on the mountain but I can see the allure of having my own boots. 

 

The packages at my local mountain include rentals, lesson, and lifts for good prices so I'm not sure I'll need to rent/buy anything for my kids other than clothes.

 

I'm not averse to purchasing some boots, but a bit apprehensive not knowing how I might ski in my older age. Like I mentioned I was a solid intermediate skier in my youth so I assume I'm barely at a beginner level now.

 

Anyway, I'll do some research on the boots knowing that we have a pretty big swap in the fall and I can check that out as well.

 

Thanks so much everyone, great advice!

 

Cory

post #33 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by OvervektNorsk View Post
 

So, purchase some second hand boots vice renting? I called the local Air Force base and they have some rental equipment there that is much more cost effective than renting on the mountain but I can see the allure of having my own boots. 

 

Second hand boots will be packed in and possibly molded to someone else's feet .... my boot fitter often has new boots from last years' stock (never my size, of course). I've also heard him suggest boots for people to find on ebay etc that he'll then fit ... 

 

It occurs to me that most or all of us suggesting you buy boots right away probably started skiing in rentals, and we didn't die.

post #34 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by OvervektNorsk View Post
 

So, purchase some second hand boots vice renting? I called the local Air Force base and they have some rental equipment there that is much more cost effective than renting on the mountain but I can see the allure of having my own boots. 

 

The packages at my local mountain include rentals, lesson, and lifts for good prices so I'm not sure I'll need to rent/buy anything for my kids other than clothes.

 

I'm not averse to purchasing some boots, but a bit apprehensive not knowing how I might ski in my older age. Like I mentioned I was a solid intermediate skier in my youth so I assume I'm barely at a beginner level now.

 

Anyway, I'll do some research on the boots knowing that we have a pretty big swap in the fall and I can check that out as well.

 

Thanks so much everyone, great advice!

 

Cory


What I did was buy "new old stock" during pre-season sales from a boot fitter (in the southeast).  I was an older intermediate getting my daughter started on skis.  Spent about $300, including an after-market footbed (like Superfeet).  Those boots were just fine for a few seasons.  I rented or did a season lease for my daughter until she was 8.  By then it was clear we would be skiing more and more.  By then I had learned a lot more about buying gear.

 

Take a few lessons.  Once you get the hang of how little effort it takes to turn skis with the correct technique, you'll be better than before in less time than you think.  I ski far better than 4-5 years ago when I started doing more trips to big mountains in the Rockies . . . starting in my mid-50s.  Lessons are not just for beginners.

post #35 of 35

Inland Empire Ski Patrol does a ski swap at the Fairgrounds every fall, and there is one at the Cd'A Fairgrounds. They are a great way to acquire lightly used ski clothes for a lot less money. They will often have new stuff too from the local shops they are trying to clear out.  This works well for skis too and there is often a number of shop people there to help with choices.

 

Depending on the age of your kids they are going to outgrow their gear at a right regular pace. Like everything else they will outgrow it long before they wear it out.

 

You are in one of the best sleeper ski regions in the country. Enjoy it.

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