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New to skiing and had a few questions. Thanks in advance!! [in PA]

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Okay so I've finally decided to give skiing a try.  I actually have several questions I was hoping someone could answer for me. You hear about accidents happening sometimes, how safe is it to ski? Are there any tips you can provide? What kind of equipment do you consider a MUST when hitting the slopes? I'm really confused on boot size I did see a chart online basing your ski length on height (I'm 5'7) Is your boot size the same size as your shoe size? What kind of clothes do you recommend? I wear glasses, should I wear goggles also? What are some safety tips you can provide? Thanks for all of the info you can provide me.

post #2 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by New2Skiing View Post
 

Okay so I've finally decided to give skiing a try.  I actually have several questions I was hoping someone could answer for me. You hear about accidents happening sometimes, how safe is it to ski? Are there any tips you can provide? What kind of equipment do you consider a MUST when hitting the slopes? I'm really confused on boot size I did see a chart online basing your ski length on height (I'm 5'7) Is your boot size the same size as your shoe size? What kind of clothes do you recommend? I wear glasses, should I wear goggles also? What are some safety tips you can provide? Thanks for all of the info you can provide me.


Welcome to EpicSki!  I suggest you browse threads in the Beginner Zone to start with.  There are also good articles in the First Run section related to getting started (click on Articles on menu bar).

 

http://www.epicski.com/f/56/beginner-zone

 

Usually helps to know what country and region you are thinking of skiing in the most.  In some cases, a visit to a ski shop is a good way to get an idea of what's available.  Beginners usually rent boots, skis, and poles to start with.  Often there is a package deal that includes a lift ticket, rental gear, and basic lesson(s) for first-time skiers.  Some places offer a multi-lesson package that is a great way to get started.

post #3 of 17
Fully aware that this might be a summer troll post ill bite.

I think there are probably a lot of first time skiing checklists either here or on the internet so I hope you take a look rather then people here rehashing it.

However my extra 2cents are your best source is if you know a friend in person who already is a skier or snowboarder who you can chat with face to face or go up with you on the first trip to show you around

Come back and post after some reading with specific questions youre still confused about
post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 

Not sure what a Summer Troll is but thanks for the tip above on the beginners board, I haven't had time to look around on the boards yet. I'm actually from the U.S and live in PA, and would like to get a seasonal pass up here where I am (York, PA) Looking forward to picking up as much as I can from here. Thanks again for the welcome!

post #5 of 17
1-Take lessons a lot your first season
2-Rent until you get to a point you can ski most of the blue runs. BUT, pay special attention to the fit of your boots!!!!! Do not go by your shoe size!! Shoes need to be long enough for the sole of the shoe to bend/arc around the bottom of your foot as you walk. Ski boots do not. Getting the right size in a rental shop each time may require you to try several pairs, bugging the guy behind the counter. Recognize this ahead of time and plan for it. Boots must be SNUG! One benefit to rentals is that generally they are already packed down so that you don't need to allow for that for one day of skiing.
3-You'll want over the glasses (OTG) goggles. Ultimately, you'll be happier with contacts. There are whole threads about fogging of goggles and glasses.
4-Dress in layers and make sure the outer layer is waterproof/breathable.
5-You WILL fall down. The more you ski, the less you will fall. Some beginners get badly hurt their first season. Some of us (me), ski 38 years before we are seriously hurt. Most accidents happen when you are tired or the slopes are crowded and the bad ones can involve speed. But... Some people can fall standing still and still get hurt. Then again, you could trip on the sidewalk anywhere. That's part of life.
6-As a beginner, you'll be happier and safer if you can start skiing midweek at first. Fewer people and more relaxing. High likelihood of smaller group sizes in lessons. Plan B, start at a less well known ski area before you go to the more famous area.
post #6 of 17
Welcome! You are very close to Roundtop which my friends recommend highly. Not been there myself as I head to the Poconos mostly. Look to see if they have a multiday lesson package. I think they are associated with Liberty and Whitetail for variety if you go for a season pass. Also check out the Mid-Atlantic/PA thread as the season ramps up. I recommend downsizing your boots as well, contacts and purchasing your own matched set of helmet and googles. You will have a blast!
post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by XLTL View Post

Welcome! You are very close to Roundtop which my friends recommend highly. Not been there myself as I head to the Poconos mostly. Look to see if they have a multiday lesson package. I think they are associated with Liberty and Whitetail for variety if you go for a season pass. Also check out the Mid-Atlantic/PA thread as the season ramps up. I recommend downsizing your boots as well, contacts and purchasing your own matched set of helmet and googles. You will have a blast!


Thanks!  Roundtop is about 40 minutes from me or less, I was thinking of going with the night club card  the first year..  I don't really know anyone who is into skiing but also hoping to meet some great people who I can enjoy the sport with. The equipment almost seems to be the most complicated, part of the process when you are going from scratch and are new. I'm def. going to go into the local ski shop here to try the boots, but is it recommended to buy at least skis, poles and bindings online? or do you recommend going into the store for those too? Just seems you can get better deals online and I found a place called EVO that sells equipment..- I don't know if you're from the york pa area but I read there is a place called Ullers that is open year around, seems most of the ski shops only open in the fall/winter(which makes sense) Dicks Sporting goods doesn't sell Skis do they? Thanks again for the great feedback and I've enjoyed reading the boards thus far.

post #8 of 17
I live near Kennett Square west of Philadelphia so don't know about your shops. I would avoid buying anything on line until you learn a little about skiing! If you start with a lesson package you will learn about the equipment through the rentals. Later most shops offer a season lease so you can upgrade your equipment year to year as you move up the learning curve. If you get a pass and ski a lot you will learn quickly IF you take the proper lessons.
post #9 of 17

Nice to see new blood in skiing. 

 

I've been to Roundtop, Liberty, and Whitetail many times. They provide a quality skiing experience without a bunch of travel. (I've only skied Pa a couple of times in the last few years. Retired to new location.)

 

I have skied most areas in Pennsylvania. Most are crowded on the weekend and quiet during the week.

 

Most all areas have some kind of beginner package.  Lift's, Lessons, and equipment at a reduced price.  Roundtop, L. and W. have a package that provides a 'never ever' with a great experience.

 

Evenings are a great time to ski.  The Night Club pass is a great deal.  Many of my friends have them.

 

Can you get injured?  Yes!  It is an action sport where falls are to be expected.  Taking lessons will help you progress in the sport with safety in mind.

 

What do you 'need' to get started?  I'd concentrate on suitable clothing first. Wet cotton isn't good.

     Helmet is available in the rental shops so rent first couple of times. 

     BUY Gloves.  They should be warm and waterproof so you will be comfortable. Second pair if possible.

     GOGGLES/GLASSES?  Plan on goggles.  Get them to fit over helmet and glasses.  As a number have said, contacts work if you can use/afford them. 

     Long Underwear will help keep you warmer.  Forget Cotton, look for synthetics, various brands.   

     Blue Jeans?  Maybe, but they will be wet and cold after the first few falls.  Carry extra for the ride home.

     Jacket; something warm and water resistant.  It gets COLD in the wind and if snow is blowing around your heat is gone before you know it.

     SWEATER; Wool or quality fleece. Again Forget cotton.  

     RENT Equipment for the first season. Renting gives you the chance to learn ski.  You can blame the equipment all you want than. Look for ski swaps in the fall. 


Edited by ali pine - 7/18/15 at 12:06pm
post #10 of 17
Do not buy boots online, ESPECIALLY when you are a beginner. It is a false economy. Buying the wrong boots, without the help of a REAL bootfitter is just flushing money down the drain. And can actually interfere with your skiing success. There's a ton of people come on here, talk all about boot models, then buy online because either they think they got enough info from us or they got sized by a local store, then cut them out of the loop to save money. I write them off my list as being worth my time. They'll be back next season bitching about something that comes down to those "cheaper" boots, you watch. They'll be talking about burning quads or chattering skis and think the boots are perfect.
post #11 of 17
A thought wuestion to the OP. Have you learned how to ice skate or rollerskate/rollerblade? If so, you can expect learning to ski will be a similar process, and in fact some of those skills may give you a head start on your skiing
post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Do not buy boots online, ESPECIALLY when you are a beginner. It is a false economy. Buying the wrong boots, without the help of a REAL bootfitter is just flushing money down the drain. And can actually interfere with your skiing success. There's a ton of people come on here, talk all about boot models, then buy online because either they think they got enough info from us or they got sized by a local store, then cut them out of the loop to save money. I write them off my list as being worth my time. They'll be back next season bitching about something that comes down to those "cheaper" boots, you watch. They'll be talking about burning quads or chattering skis and think the boots are perfect.


Thanks for the advice on this one! I read online that a place here in PA does ski equipment leasing. They offer skis, boots and poles for 250.00 for the season with the option to buy later.. I think this sounds like a great route to go!

post #13 of 17
As long as you have the option to change the equipment to another size, length, etc., that sounds fine. I doubt you'll buy the rental equipment if you stay on this board, though. ;-)
post #14 of 17
Rent boots 1 full size smaller than your shoe size. They should feel snug, maybe too snug at first. But then when you buckle them and lean your shin forward, you will feel your toes pull away from the front of the boot. You are good to go.

Skiing is like mountain biking in that being too tentative is not good. Going too slow and leaning back makes you unstable and more likely to fall. Let your skis run a little bit, bend your knees and body forward, and be confident. Takes a leap of faith I understand, kind of like the first time you rode your bike without training wheels.

Finally, falling is normal and ok. If you aren't falling, you're not improving. That goes for advanced skiers, too, by the way. When you know you are falling, let yourself fall. Your skis will pop off and you'll be able to absorb the fall by rolling your body. Injuries happen when people hold on too long, get themselves in more dangerous positions, twist their knees up, etc.
post #15 of 17

Also about falling on snow...it's not the kitchen floor, nor the sidewalk, nor the forest floor with sticks and stones.  

The snow you'll be skiing on is tilted, it's slippery, and sometimes it's even soft.  So you usually either fall into a soft pillow, or you slide when you hit which turns the impact into a glancing blow.  

Let the falls happen, and laugh as you get up.  

Oh, and wear a helmet.

post #16 of 17
The first pieces of ski equipment I bought were a helmet and goggles, and I've never regretted it. I have regretted my boots, which I purchased before discovering this site. frown.gif
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by New2Skiing View Post
 


Thanks!  Roundtop is about 40 minutes from me or less, I was thinking of going with the night club card  the first year..  I don't really know anyone who is into skiing but also hoping to meet some great people who I can enjoy the sport with. The equipment almost seems to be the most complicated, part of the process when you are going from scratch and are new. I'm def. going to go into the local ski shop here to try the boots, but is it recommended to buy at least skis, poles and bindings online? or do you recommend going into the store for those too? Just seems you can get better deals online and I found a place called EVO that sells equipment..- I don't know if you're from the york pa area but I read there is a place called Ullers that is open year around, seems most of the ski shops only open in the fall/winter(which makes sense) Dicks Sporting goods doesn't sell Skis do they? Thanks again for the great feedback and I've enjoyed reading the boards thus far.

If you are thinking of doing Roundtop as a beginner they have a special you can't beat. I would look at the mountain passport, last year I took my sister out for her first ski trip, and it was before christmas break so they were running a beginners pass for somewhere around $49 (lesson, lift and rental) with the option to buy a discount card with your next visit free for another $49.... in the past the discount card has given 40% lift and rentals as well as free lessons for the whole season. I would honestly rent and ski on the discount card for the whole season, and then buy your equipment for the following season. (and either get an an advantage card/night pass/season pass for that year) The discount card is good for whitetail/liberty/roundtop so I would try and visit all 3 and get in as many days as you can.
https://www.skiroundtop.com/deals-for-new-skiers-and-snowboarders 

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › New to skiing and had a few questions. Thanks in advance!! [in PA]