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When did you start having a quiver? - Page 5

post #121 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmeb View Post
 

For 3-ski quivers I'm starting to sense a general formula that fits low, normal, and high snow days.

 

In the west:

  1. Mid 80s frontside / carver.
  2. Everyday mid 90s - mid 100s
  3. Snow day 115+

 

In the east:

  1. Carver low-mid 70s 
  2. Everyday, mid 80s.
  3. Snow day 100-115.

 

Most us freeskiers could get away with less. People who pursue a discipline (park, race, moguls) probably add one or two. 

Yup. I'm 83, 95, and 108. I have some others (a 112 and a 72) but I use those three 90% of the time.

post #122 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmeb View Post
 

For 3-ski quivers I'm starting to sense a general formula that fits low, normal, and high snow days.

 

In the west:

  1. Mid 80s frontside / carver.
  2. Everyday mid 90s - mid 100s
  3. Snow day 115+

 

In the east:

  1. Carver low-mid 70s 
  2. Everyday, mid 80s.
  3. Snow day 100-115.

 

Most us freeskiers could get away with less. People who pursue a discipline (park, race, moguls) probably add one or two. 

Yup. I'm 83, 95, and 108. I have some others (a 112 and a 72) but I use those three 90% of the time.

 

The exact width of the powder ski may have a lot to do with the weight of the skier.


Edited by bounceswoosh - 7/29/15 at 9:31pm
post #123 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 

Yup. I'm 83, 95, and 108. I have some others (a 112 and a 72) but I use those three 90% of the time.

 

This season my quiver is a snow-hopeful one for Colorado: 84, 106, 125. 

post #124 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmeb View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 

Yup. I'm 83, 95, and 108. I have some others (a 112 and a 72) but I use those three 90% of the time.

 

This season my quiver is a snow-hopeful one for Colorado: 84, 106, 125. 

 

That's sort of what I have. 88, 100, 110, 125. And then a couple of 70-somethings I have on loan to check out for early season. But width is only part of the story.

post #125 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

Most days a two-ski quiver works pretty well in the EAST.  If you ski a big mountain and conditions are hard start out with the SGs and switch to the GS when it gets too crowded.  Smaller hill it's start with GS and switch to SLs.

 

You may want to include deep day fatty, and a tight tree ski, but you don't need to.

 

That's my sort of quiver... except I'd drop the SGs. Trouble is, every time I took the GSs out I'd have in the back of my mind that I could be having slightly more fun on the SLs. For me, there in lies the problem with a quiver... it forces you to actively choose to go out and ski of a day on your second or third favourite ski. I only ever do that when it's rocky.

post #126 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post


You mean, besides powder skis, like race skis?

 

...damn!... you have a good point there!

post #127 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

Most days a two-ski quiver works pretty well in the EAST.  If you ski a big mountain and conditions are hard start out with the SGs and switch to the GS when it gets too crowded.  Smaller hill it's start with GS and switch to SLs.

You may want to include deep day fatty, and a tight tree ski, but you don't need to.

I only post in fear that someone will actually believe your out standing in you field SG BS... Its no longer 1990. No one other than racers training on a closed course ski SG skis out here. I mean no one. Very few even ski GS skis unless it's just crappy rock hard all day on week day (not weekend) piste, and even then, a cheater or carver is what you're likely to fine. There's just way too much terrain that an SG or even a GS ski isn't very suitable if one has an 85-100mm general purpose all mountain ski. No point in peeing into the breeze when more versatility is available... unless you just like hearing the sound of yourself talking about the joy of peeing in said breeze.
post #128 of 139

If I skied in the PNW, I would not be skiing an SG ski either, but I won't be skiing an 85-100 mm ski very often at Tremblant.   If you enjoy making clean pure arc-2-arc turns at speed on hard snow and ice, you need a long radius, stable skinny ski.  Horses for courses.


Edited by Ghost - 7/30/15 at 5:18am
post #129 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by FergusInFrance View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

Most days a two-ski quiver works pretty well in the EAST.  If you ski a big mountain and conditions are hard start out with the SGs and switch to the GS when it gets too crowded.  Smaller hill it's start with GS and switch to SLs.

 

You may want to include deep day fatty, and a tight tree ski, but you don't need to.

 

That's my sort of quiver... except I'd drop the SGs. Trouble is, every time I took the GSs out I'd have in the back of my mind that I could be having slightly more fun on the SLs. For me, there in lies the problem with a quiver... it forces you to actively choose to go out and ski of a day on your second or third favourite ski. I only ever do that when it's rocky.

The idea isn't to be on your second or third favorite ski. It's to be on your favorite ski for anticipated conditions. If you have one ski that you would rather ski in everything from groomers to a foot of powder, then good for you!

post #130 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by FergusInFrance View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

Most days a two-ski quiver works pretty well in the EAST.  If you ski a big mountain and conditions are hard start out with the SGs and switch to the GS when it gets too crowded.  Smaller hill it's start with GS and switch to SLs.

 

You may want to include deep day fatty, and a tight tree ski, but you don't need to.

 

That's my sort of quiver... except I'd drop the SGs. Trouble is, every time I took the GSs out I'd have in the back of my mind that I could be having slightly more fun on the SLs. For me, there in lies the problem with a quiver... it forces you to actively choose to go out and ski of a day on your second or third favourite ski. I only ever do that when it's rocky.


I know exactly what you mean.  I loaned my SLs out for a season and had to ski GS radius skis, and felt the same way most of the time. And  I was on a small hill most of the time too, so it was worse!  If you have the other ski down at the lodge, the thought that you can switch at lunch makes it better.   That and the fact that I enjoy GS on a big hill as much as as I do SL (and almost as much as I do high speed turns).

post #131 of 139

On a trip to Yurp a few years ago, I found myself confronted with having to commit to a single ski choice for multiple days. It was then that I recognized the lack of versatility in my quiver. At the time, I only had two choices; 83mm twin, or 112mm faty. I opted for the 112's since there was snow in the forecast, and had a blast on the first day, but for the rest of the week would have preferred something skinnier.

 

It was a great trip regardless, but changed my focus a little about what I should be looking for in skis, and ski clothing for that matter. What if I approach every ski day like a trip abroad, where I can only bring one pair of skis, and one ski outfit? What if there is no going back to the car? Is it possible to choose just the right gear for the majority of conditions, so that the idea of going back to the car for a change never enters my empty skull?

 

I think the short answer is yes; the longer answer is; it depends on your individual preference, the conditions you're likely to encounter, and what you'd like to do with them. (also, how much do you like to geek out when it comes to equipment?) I do think there's hope for me; probably in the form of a 100mm all-mountain twin, insulated pants and jacket with venting options, and a neutral goggle tint.

 

That longer answer is going to depend a lot on who's doing the answering, but if the net result is less trips backs to the car, and greater enjoyment by the end user, it's probably the right one. 

 

Trips abroad (or anywhere that you can only bring one pair of skis) can be a great excuse to demo something different, should conditions not suit the skis you brought. I must remember this when chattering across a flat and frozen WROD on mid-fats in the next 60-90 days.

post #132 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by MT Skull View Post

I must remember this when chattering across a flat and frozen WROD on mid-fats in the next 60-90 days.

That will be as much fun as chattering across a flat and frozen WROD on mid-80's with CO edges, and the 100mm twin will be a lot more fun if we have another manmade Spring WROD season like last year, with SlurpeeBumps (tm) and whatnot wink.gif.

ps - Oakley Flight Deck in Prizm Rose
post #133 of 139

Oakley's pinch my nose and make me sound (more) like a poindexter.

 

Kind of intrigued by Smith's Polarchromic red sensor lens, but holy crap are they expensive!:eek

post #134 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by NayBreak View Post


That will be as much fun as chattering across a flat and frozen WROD on mid-80's with CO edges, and the 100mm twin will be a lot more fun if we have another manmade Spring WROD season like last year, with SlurpeeBumps (tm) and whatnot wink.gif.

ps - Oakley Flight Deck in Prizm Rose

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MT Skull View Post
 

Oakley's pinch my nose and make me sound (more) like a poindexter.

 

Kind of intrigued by Smith's Polarchromic red sensor lens, but holy crap are they expensive!:eek


Oh boy are we now talking about sunglasses and goggle quivers?  I've now got matching Vuarnet cases and added about five pairs of each to this and retired one or two but you get the picture..

 

 

Don't get me started on skateboard and soccer shoes..  or sports jerseys LOL.

post #135 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

 

 


Oh boy are we now talking about sunglasses and goggle quivers?  I've now got matching Vuarnet cases and added about five pairs of each to this and retired one or two but you get the picture..

 

 

Don't get me started on skateboard and soccer shoes..  or sports jerseys LOL.

 

Nothing but Luxottica? Maybe you should add a pair of Maui Jim's and get a pouch like this :

 

post #136 of 139
5 RayBans^^^
post #137 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

5 RayBans^^^


I've also got a pair of RayBan Aviators that didn't make it in to that photo..

post #138 of 139
I own one pair of sunglasses. But then I don't live in an area that's known for its sun.
post #139 of 139

First quiver I remember having was a Salomon 9000 3S for Slalom and a 9000 1S for GS, both Pr8's. Before that the occasional rock ski as a second ski but didn't really consider that to be a quiver. 

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