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Help me with turning in one direction better

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I find turning to the left much easier than to the right. My right foot bobbles a bit weak yet my left is strong on turns in the left direction...I am a entry level intermediate skier ...does anyone else struggle to control tight turns in a certain directions?

post #2 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by rachael View Post
 

I find turning to the left much easier than to the right. My right foot bobbles a bit weak yet my left is strong on turns in the left direction...I am a entry level intermediate skier ...does anyone else struggle to control tight turns in a certain directions?


This may be a good thread starter to get more specific advice for you. 

post #3 of 14

mod note - moved to a new thread

post #4 of 14
It could be an alignment issue, but more likely it tells me your right handed/footed and your turn to left is more stable and confident on your dominant right leg. If so you just need to practice turning right until you feel as stable and confident on your left leg.
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thank you coach 13.....I may ski wrong but when I take a tight left turn 75% of the weight is on my left foot and the right is stable.... but on the right turn I am wobbly on the rt foot at faster speeds. Is this just because I am more basic in skiing? 

post #6 of 14
A few questions might be in order here. Habitual dominance and stance issues come to my mind first. Often a too inclined stance starts higher up in the body. Then again even that tends to be a work around for poor alignment of the lower half of the body. Boot alignment helps but without assessing pelvic tilt, knee and hip function, and how you developed the muscles in those areas, you may find the solution take a while to find.
post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 

We normally only go once a year with 5 days of skiing...We are from Florida:cool  I learned by just jumping down the mountain and knowing how to snow plow. lol My skills have improved but most may say is this her first season. Our kids have mastered the art of skiing quiet well and fly down blues and blacks with control...I am the straggler. Next time I go much to think about with posture as I just bend knees and lean forward.  Thanks for the input

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by rachael View Post

I find turning to the left much easier than to the right. My right foot bobbles a bit weak yet my left is strong on turns in the left direction...I am a entry level intermediate skier ...does anyone else struggle to control tight turns in a certain directions?

Originally Posted by rachael View Post

Thank you coach 13.....I may ski wrong but when I take a tight left turn 75% of the weight is on my left foot and the right is stable.... but on the right turn I am wobbly on the rt foot at faster speeds. Is this just because I am more basic in skiing? 

Originally Posted by rachael View Post

We normally only go once a year with 5 days of skiing...We are from Florida:cool  I learned by just jumping down the mountain and knowing how to snow plow. lol My skills have improved but most may say is this her first season. Our kids have mastered the art of skiing quiet well and fly down blues and blacks with control...I am the straggler. Next time I go much to think about with posture as I just bend knees and lean forward.  Thanks for the input

 

Here's what I'm reading:

You are focusing on and seeking a strong controlling left foot on left turns, and a strong controlling right foot on right turns.  

You find your right turns a problem because that right foot bobbles.

You like that on your left turns you have most of your weight on the left foot, and that foot feels strong and in control.  It does not bobble.  

You have not had any lessons.  You figured out how to ski on your own!  You ski 5 days a year with your family, and you want to ski better because they are advancing faster than you are.

 

First, know that skiing is definitely counter-intuitive.  Logic fails when people teach themselves to ski, because all we've learned prior to skiing depends our feet dependably gripping non-slippery surfaces as we travel in straight lines.  With that said, you've got something backwards, as do many people who teach themselves.  You think the left foot should be your controlling, weighted foot on those left turns. Whoops, it should be the right foot!  And vice versa on turns in the other direction.  Before going any further, let's get some terminology going so this doesn't get too confusing.

 

When you make a turn, you have an inside foot and an outside foot.  Think of the turn as a half circle.  So on left turns, the left foot will always be your inside foot.  That means your right foot is your outside foot.  And vice versa.

 

Rule No.1:  You should direct most of your weight to your outside foot.  The outside foot should be the strong, weighted foot In all your turns at this point in your development as a skier.

Rule No.2:  The inside foot has a very important role, but it's not carrying your weight.  

Rule No.3:  Take a lesson to figure out how to give each foot its proper role!  It is hard to figure it out on your own.  

 

Where do you usually ski?  Do you go skiing during Christmas vacation, or Spring Break? or sometime other than a big crowded holiday?  People can give you advice on getting the most out of your lessons depending on where and when you go.


Edited by LiquidFeet - 7/10/15 at 4:10pm
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by rachael View Post
 

We normally only go once a year with 5 days of skiing...We are from Florida:cool  I learned by just jumping down the mountain and knowing how to snow plow. lol My skills have improved but most may say is this her first season. Our kids have mastered the art of skiing quiet well and fly down blues and blacks with control...I am the straggler. Next time I go much to think about with posture as I just bend knees and lean forward.  Thanks for the input


Not an instructor but I am a parent of a kid who started skiing pretty young with a few days in the southeast.  Did you put your kids in ski school?  How often during the ski week?  How many times have you had a lesson?  While you can figure out how to survive getting down easy slopes, it's much more fun after the learning fundamentals.  Generally much easier to make sure you aren't developing bad habits if you at least do a lesson towards the beginning of a ski week.

post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 

OOPS! I guess I have some very bad habits....I ski tahoe every christmas but not this year..I will be posting my timeshare 3/2 for rent for this year. We ski Mount Rose and we also love Homewood. I enjoy going away from the high traffic Mt. I like where the locals go and they all ski amazing. I am the dork on the mountain:Ott

I did learn a lot from your post...thank you


Edited by rachael - 7/10/15 at 4:56pm
post #11 of 14

Well maybe you feel like the dork on the mountain but you can learn!  Take a lesson.  If budget is an issue, take a group lesson at a non-crowded mountain on a weekday so there won't be such a large group.  Take that lesson in the morning of your first day on vacation as marznc advised, and if you can, plan the vacation so that first morning will be a weekday.  A weekday lesson during a non-holiday week might end up being a group lesson with only one student.  If your budget allows, just buy a private lesson; ask at the desk how long a lesson would be best to get your specific turning mechanics straightened out.

 

Do understand that the lesson shows you what to do that's different from what you normally do, but practice outside the lesson is essential for getting those new movement patterns embedded in your muscle memory. Keep consciously using the new movements until they get engrained.  Avoid "just skiing for fun" after the lesson; ski with purpose instead.  Write down what you learned during lunch and review your notes at night to make sure you still have things right.  Practice all week.   If you liked your instructor, ask for that same person next year when you return.

 

If you are thinking about skiing right now in July, you are definitely hooked.  You can read here on Epic about skiing all summer and fall, if you want, like we do.  Welcome to the club.

post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 

So I just asked my family and they ski well....they all take turns with pressure on the outside foot. I am backwards lol ...Nothing like tahoe and the mountains...we love it so much and will miss it this year greatly. I agree with your comments and if I get to ski again will try everything you said...my husband is laughing saying it would be good to grab a lesson.

post #13 of 14
So Rachel here are a few ideas to play with this summer. The first is to play tug of war with the family. As you grab the rope stand so you hips are about at a 45 degree angle to the rope. As your patner pulls on the rope notice how it shifts yiur weight to the toes of the front foot. Now put your hips 60 degrees to the rope and see if you find the rope pulls your weight even more onto the front foot but not onto those toes. Which option allows you to resist the pull of the rope more?

Now imagine a car and a ball running around loose in the back seat. What would happen to the ball when you turn a corner. It would move towards to side of the car to the outside of that turn. In reality it is trying to go straight and the car turned beneath it.

On skis our body always wants to go straight just like the ball and our skis are turning beneath us just like the car. When the ski edges are engaged we should feel a natural weight shift very similar to what we felt playing tug of war. The sharper the turn the more we should feel that weight shift. So indeed you may have this back to front and find yourself leaning so most of your weight stays on the inside foot. Try keeping your jacket zipper vertical, or very close to vertical on skis and during the tug of war game. I think you will notice a lot more stability and power to the snow when you learn to balance on that outsude edge.

When you get to go skiing I recommend a half day of getting back on the snow without a whole lot of technical focus but try to incorporate the vertical zipper from time to time just to experience first hand how different it feels. Being from sea level adjusting to higher altitude and the sensation of sliding on snow is a pretty full plate.
Then when those things are in place it might be time to focus more on technique and any changes we might suggest here or during a lesson. As far as practice on your iwn subsequent to the introduction to the changes, I feel strongly that this is when a ski coach is most necessary because their feedback is only available then. Why practice and ingrain the wrong move? Hope that makes sense...
post #14 of 14

I have had success with simply making your first and last turn, the weaker one.This is each time you push off and stop, (a segment or a run). It just creates a situation where you are practicing both when your legs are fresh, and tired.

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