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The future of drones - Page 3

post #61 of 82

Here come the drone kites, which should fly under future FCC regulations (pun intended) and would be great for skiers, This one is affordable, and fits into a tube. Every kid running gates will want one.

 

 

 

Here is the INDIEGOGO link: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/fotokite-phi-tethered-uav-for-aerial-filming#/story

post #62 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post
 

Here come the drone kites, which should fly under future FCC regulations (pun intended) and would be great for skiers, This one is affordable, and fits into a tube. Every kid running gates will want one.

 

 

That raises another interesting question.  Is a fairly large kite on the end of 1.000+ feet of string going to get some child thrown in jail of they fly it a half mile away from the airport? People also occasionally attach small cameras to kites.   I don't think I've ever heard anyone complain about kites anywhere in this manner. I suspect drones may be treated differently because they could potentially be guided in to objects, people or other aircraft intentionally??? Is that what all this concern is really about, that an innocent looking drone could actually be a small guided missile? 

post #63 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

That raises another interesting question.  Is a fairly large kite on the end of 1.000+ feet of string going to get some child thrown in jail of they fly it a half mile away from the airport? People also occasionally attach small cameras to kites.   I don't think I've ever heard anyone complain about kites anywhere in this manner. I suspect drones may be treated differently because they could potentially be guided in to objects, people or other aircraft intentionally??? Is that what all this concern is really about, that an innocent looking drone could actually be a small guided missile? 


This isn't rocket science (pun intended) since the regulations are already in place: http://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?rgn=div5&node=14:2.0.1.3.15 

 

I would think it is unlikely for a "moored" balloon, kite, or tethered drone would fly high enough to raise the ire of the FAA since the rules should be no different than what is found in Subpart B (see above link). This means height restrictions, distance restrictions (5 miles from any airport), etc.

 

I imagine all ski areas will ban drones including tethered ones. Still, it would be fun to photograph the family skiing from a sky perspective. If one is small enough to fit into a backpack, it would be easy enough to use it on an empty trail or bowl.

post #64 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post
 


This isn't rocket science (pun intended) since the regulations are already in place: http://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?rgn=div5&node=14:2.0.1.3.15 

 

So that seems to say you can't fly a kite at over 500 feet close to the airport.  Can you fly drones at 499 feet around the airport?  My point is that people fear drones more because they have the potential to be used as a guided missile and carry something dangerous instead of a camera. 

post #65 of 82
post #66 of 82

All the concern is humoring as the FAA is launching an App. This way few have excuse since apps fix all! :D Ignorance of the law need not be, less your a terrorist as you don't really care:

 

From Aviation Week via AerospaceDaily: 

 

FAA Launches Smartphone App To Help UAV Users


The FAA is launching a beta version of a new smartphone
application designed for use by UAV users.


The application, called B4UFly, is aimed at model aircraft
users and is designed to give them information about restrictions
and requirements in effect at their current or planned
flight location.


Many UAV users have little or no aviation experience, and some
fly the UAVs where they can pose a danger to manned aircraft.
B4UFly will give fliers the knowledge to operate safely, FAA said.
For example, the app determines restrictions or requirements
in effect where they want to fly. It gives the user a status icon
that considers airspace, proximity to airports, temporary flight
restrictions, current law and other FAA guidance and procedures.
It also gives information on the parameters that drive the
status indicator, a “Planner Mode” for future flights in different 

locations, interactive maps with filtering options, and links to
other FAA unmanned aircraft systems resources and regulatory
information, FAA says.


Operators of model aircraft that fly within 5 mi. of an airport
are required by law to notify the airport and the air traffic control
tower, if there is one at the airport, before operating the model
aircraft, it said.


FAA is working on an electronic notification process to satisfy the
requirement that will become part of a future version of the app.
During the beta test, FAA will collect feedback and operational
data from users to develop the electronic notification process, it
said.


FAA Administrator Michael Huerta announced the initiative
in May and asked for volunteers to test the app. Those who have
already signed up will receive the app soon.
The beta testing is expected to last several months. FAA then
plans to make B4UFLY available to the general public. The beta
testing will only be available for iOS devices at first, but FAA is
working on a version that will also be compatible with Android
devices.
— Molly McMillin, molly.mcmillin@aviationweek.com

post #67 of 82

I'll just leave this here then...

 

 

And this:

 

post #68 of 82

Some idiot crashed their drone in to the stadium at the US Open yesterday.

 

US Open: New York teacher arrested after drone crashes into stands

post #69 of 82

yup,

 

once a tipping point is hit, swift fast regulations will reign down upon all. Much like being unruly on an airplane will get you arrested and some hefty fines. Some folks just don't seem to contemplate the "what if's"

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

Some idiot crashed their drone in to the stadium at the US Open yesterday.

 

US Open: New York teacher arrested after drone crashes into stands

post #70 of 82
Thread Starter 

More amateur drone users have caused issues with firefighters in California, which has spawned a PSA 

post #71 of 82

Here it comes..  They're probably going to require registration of all devices capable of flying higher than X and farther from the radio than Y.. X and Y TBD..  Registration would be similar to what people had to to do legally operate CB radios in the 70s.  They cite airport traffic and accidents such as crashing in to kids on playgrounds as the reasons.  Those are good reasons of course, but  I suspect the potential use as weapons as the main reason why registration will be required.  

 

Federal regulators to require registration of recreational drones

post #72 of 82
Thread Starter 

Freeskier  article says that there are several North American Resorts working with a company to allow Drones for specific use. 

http://freeskier.com/stories/attack-of-the-drones-several-north-american-ski-areas-partner-with-video-service-to-permit-in-resort-use-of-aerial-devices

post #73 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
 

Freeskier  article says that there are several North American Resorts working with a company to allow Drones for specific use. 

http://freeskier.com/stories/attack-of-the-drones-several-north-american-ski-areas-partner-with-video-service-to-permit-in-resort-use-of-aerial-devices

The $150 package (from the article) seems reasonable. 

 

Drones can also be used by ski areas for other reasons: Getting light supplies up/down the mountain quickly, finding a lost skier or one in trouble, identifying potential maintenance issues, giving a picture of where snowmaking guns are blowing in heavy winds, etc. 

post #74 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post
 

The $150 package (from the article) seems reasonable. 

 

Drones can also be used by ski areas for other reasons: Getting light supplies up/down the mountain quickly, finding a lost skier or one in trouble, identifying potential maintenance issues, giving a picture of where snowmaking guns are blowing in heavy winds, etc. 

 

 

I'd probably be skeptical of the last part.. but in favorable flying conditions RC copters with cameras can do quite a bit for sure..

post #75 of 82

So this just happened.

 

post #76 of 82
That guy's living a charmed life. Didn't even look like he noticed.
post #77 of 82

If you want to comment on the marcel drone incident, please use this thread,

post #78 of 82
post #79 of 82

I'm all for drones in the use of back country. My thought is that if you have a drone and are using it to capture content of yourself skiing, why are you skiing at the resorts any ways? If there were no ban on drones you would have a lot of weekend warriors rocking up to the mountain thinking they are going to produce the next "Art of Flight" 

post #80 of 82
post #81 of 82
post #82 of 82
.... You forgot to say something, @TheSkiMogul?
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheSkiMogul View Post

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