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jackson hole too difficult? - Page 2

post #31 of 52
Quote:
There is really nothing much to do in Targhee or Driggs beside ski and sleep.

You left out eat. For a town of less than 2,000 Driggs has some very good restaurants. There are two Thai restaurants, including a branch of Teton Thai. I ate at Bangkok Kitchen when I was there during this year's gathering and my dish was excellent. There is also a Korean/sushi restaurant that is supposed to be good. There was a large supermarket across from The Pines, where I stayed, and it looked liked a couple of interesting places to have a drink or a beer. But if you want to go to a microbrewery, you need to go to Victor, ID (less than 10 miles and with a population probably now over 2,000) where there are two.

post #32 of 52
Thread Starter 

I think I have described them correctly as "expert" - they love Hanging Valley Wall in Snowmass and spent time doing chutes/bowls and outside the gates at Steamboat.  But maybe this is advanced -- compared to what they may find at Jackson Hole.  In any case, they love the steeps and challenge, but are also happy on intermediate trails in and out of trees and doing some bumps and jumps.  What is not to like?  Based on all of the comments here, we have decided to wait on Jackson Hole, but are not crossing it off the bucket list.  Especially if we opt for spring skiing some time in the future.  Thanks so much for all of the advice and input!

post #33 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by tseeb View Post
 
Quote:
There is really nothing much to do in Targhee or Driggs beside ski and sleep.

You left out eat. For a town of less than 2,000 Driggs has some very good restaurants. There are two Thai restaurants, including a branch of Teton Thai. I ate at Bangkok Kitchen when I was there during this year's gathering and my dish was excellent. There is also a Korean/sushi restaurant that is supposed to be good. There was a large supermarket across from The Pines, where I stayed, and it looked liked a couple of interesting places to have a drink or a beer. But if you want to go to a microbrewery, you need to go to Victor, ID (less than 10 miles and with a population probably now over 2,000) where there are two.


Agree that there are a few good places to eat in Driggs.  The trip when my friends and I stayed at The Pines, we walked to the Royal Wolf and had a very good meal.  But I would rather find lodging on the Jackson side if staying for a week or more.  Especially with a mixed ability group that includes intermediates who might not want to ski as much with low visibility.  That may or may not apply to the OP's situation.

post #34 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by joycelan View Post
 

I think I have described them correctly as "expert" - they love Hanging Valley Wall in Snowmass and spent time doing chutes/bowls and outside the gates at Steamboat.  But maybe this is advanced -- compared to what they may find at Jackson Hole.  In any case, they love the steeps and challenge, but are also happy on intermediate trails in and out of trees and doing some bumps and jumps.  What is not to like?  Based on all of the comments here, we have decided to wait on Jackson Hole, but are not crossing it off the bucket list.  Especially if we opt for spring skiing some time in the future.  Thanks so much for all of the advice and input!


I have no doubt your children on college breaks are very good skiers who like a challenge.  There is plenty of terrain at JH that is great for for "advanced" skiers who like steeps, chutes, or bowls.  Around EpicSki, there are far more advanced skiers than true "experts."  Meaning folks who are very comfortable on any complex terrain in any conditions.  An expert can take the tram up to the top of Lone Peak at Big Sky and ski down any line regardless of snow conditions or visibility.  An advanced skier might start with Liberty before deciding which other areas to explore that day.  An expert who goes to Big Sky for Christmas and finds the tram never opens due to low snow conditions might be disappointed.

 

It's fair to say that advanced skiers can have a very good time at pretty much any destination resort like JH, even during Christmas vacation with early season snow conditions.

post #35 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by joycelan View Post
 

I think I have described them correctly as "expert" - they love Hanging Valley Wall in Snowmass and spent time doing chutes/bowls and outside the gates at Steamboat.  But maybe this is advanced -- compared to what they may find at Jackson Hole.  In any case, they love the steeps and challenge, but are also happy on intermediate trails in and out of trees and doing some bumps and jumps.  What is not to like?  Based on all of the comments here, we have decided to wait on Jackson Hole, but are not crossing it off the bucket list.  Especially if we opt for spring skiing some time in the future.  Thanks so much for all of the advice and input!

 

Joycelan, you and your family will have a great time in Utah or any of the other recommended places since your kinds also enjoy non-expert runs.  I would worry less about terrain and more about crowds and logistics (like close lodging, which is limited in many Utah areas)

 

All, I think this thread highlights a false assumption about expert skiers.  The truth is many expert skiers enjoy skiing advanced and intermediate runs too.  Frankly, anyone who skis at xmas better enjoy intermediate runs because there are significant odds of zero expert and even zero advanced runs being open. 

 

I'm an example of an expert skier who skis every xmas.  I assume expert runs will be closed at xmas and occasionally I get lucky.  I still have a great time skiing with family over xmas.  In Feb/March/April, I enjoy the expert stuff.

post #36 of 52
They'll be fine at Jackson. Good grief, there's plenty of terrain there. No reason to debate expert or not. The issue is the other stuff. The blue cruisers. Betwen Jackson and Targhee you can have yourself a nice time. It's all up to what you want. There's not much at Big Sky other than skiing either.The closest to Aspen Snowmass yet different would be Jackson.
post #37 of 52
There is a 63% chance that one of a family or group of four east coast blue square skiers will end up dead or with a serious injury by day 3 or 4 of an average 6 to 7 day vacation.

It's simple math. We stick with Steamboat.
post #38 of 52
I really hope you are joking. There was precisely one inbounds death at JH each of the last two seasons with over a million skier days. Do that math.
post #39 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by crystalmountainskier View Post

I really hope you are joking. There was precisely one inbounds death at JH each of the last two seasons with over a million skier days. Do that math.

Actually that's really low - does JH avoid getting the ageing unfit flatlanders whose hearts can't take physical exertion after a heavy lunch at altitude?

post #40 of 52
Thread Starter 

Certainly Steamboat is not safer than any other - if you are on runs over your ski ability you will probably end up hurt.  Too fast/too tired end of day runs end up with the same.  The only injury we have encountered in our family was broken wrist - daughter trying snowboarding - private lesson - on a green run. We wouldn't be unsafe at JH - just wondering if there was enough terrain at the intermediate level to keep us happy.  In any case, we have opted out of JH this year, not because of safety.  We will be going to SLC based on the advice of many posters here - early snow, lots of choices.  (Solitude/pcmr/canyons)  We will stay flexible on plans in slc based on early snow and crowds.  Thanks to all for all of the advice.  I will post a TR upon our return!!

post #41 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by joycelan View Post
 

Certainly Steamboat is not safer than any other - if you are on runs over your ski ability you will probably end up hurt.  Too fast/too tired end of day runs end up with the same.  The only injury we have encountered in our family was broken wrist - daughter trying snowboarding - private lesson - on a green run. We wouldn't be unsafe at JH - just wondering if there was enough terrain at the intermediate level to keep us happy.  In any case, we have opted out of JH this year, not because of safety.  We will be going to SLC based on the advice of many posters here - early snow, lots of choices.  (Solitude/pcmr/canyons)  We will stay flexible on plans in slc based on early snow and crowds.  Thanks to all for all of the advice.  I will post a TR upon our return!!

Well ... all joking aside, you can get yourself into deep doo-doo at JH a lot easier than at Steamboat. Cliffs, you know.

post #42 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

They'll be fine at Jackson. Good grief, there's plenty of terrain there. No reason to debate expert or not. The issue is the other stuff. The blue cruisers. Betwen Jackson and Targhee you can have yourself a nice time. It's all up to what you want. There's not much at Big Sky other than skiing either.The closest to Aspen Snowmass yet different would be Jackson.

Whether you think Jackson is too hard depends on your attitude, and I think it's too hard for me now. There's always plenty of groomed cruisers at major resorts, that's a commercial necessity.  But as I age, I'm beginning to feel like I'm missing the main event at some resorts.  At Steamboat, I still ski everywhere easily, but at Big Sky maybe I'm only watching when my son does Dictator Chutes.  Worse still, this age thing seems to be irreversible. YMMV, but not by much.

 

BK

post #43 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by joycelan View Post
 

Certainly Steamboat is not safer than any other - 

Almost every ski death I know about was the result of skiing off of a blue trail into trees or a lift tower or another skier.   Gnarly chutes and trees may seem more dangerous, and they may cause lots of injuries, but in reality there's for more skiers, and far more injuries, on the groomers.

I don't know of any data to compare injury rates on groomers to off piste injury rates, but tat would be interesting.

 

BK 

post #44 of 52

Quote = nathanvg:

I'm an example of an expert skier who skis every xmas.  I assume expert runs will be closed at xmas and occasionally I get lucky.  I still have a great time skiing with family over xmas.  In Feb/March/April, I enjoy the expert stuff.

Fair enough for someone who is skiing big mountains all season long.  The OP states her family only gets one destination trip a season, so thus the need to be more discriminating if there are expert skiers in the family.

Quote = joycelan:
Based on all of the comments here, we have decided to wait on Jackson Hole, but are not crossing it off the bucket list.  Especially if we opt for spring skiing some time in the future.

We have had this debate many times over the past decade, but perhaps joycelan has not seen it. 

http://www.epicski.com/t/104147/jackson-hole-or-snowbird-spring-break-trip/30

Jackson is far preferred at Christmas despite lift lines vs.spring break with the steep SE exposure. 

 

My GF Liz is a perfect example of an advanced but not expert skier.  Jackson Hole is one of her very favorite places to ski. In a solid majority of Christmases nearly all the terrain she likes to ski would be open.  Jackson's record is about as good as Snowbird's in that regard, though not as good as Alta's.   Whistler is the other place that comes to mind with a good track record of getting many of its steeps open by Christmas. 


Edited by Tony Crocker - 6/22/15 at 8:38pm
post #45 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by crystalmountainskier View Post

I really hope you are joking. There was precisely one inbounds death at JH each of the last two seasons with over a million skier days. Do that math.

Of course I am joking. 

post #46 of 52

Back to the original question, I would definitely argue that Jackson Hole's blue runs are generally steeper than what you will find at most Colorado and Utah locations (including Telluride).  However, that doesn't mean you won't have plenty to ski there.  I would recommend JH for most types of skiers except for beginners.  There is one lift that provides VERY EASY beginner terrain (Teewinot) and the jump up to the Casper area is a significant leap with nothing in between.  Heck...even Snowbird has more terrain to offer beginners, in my opinion.

post #47 of 52

We are going to JH with our ski club in March.  Most of the members are intermediate skiers - they have been to JH before and loved it.

post #48 of 52

Snowbird has *nothing* for intermediates.  But ALTA (and Solitude, Park City, etc) is another story.  Since you folks will go to SLC you'll have great choices. 

post #49 of 52

Utah?

 

One word!

 

Snowbasin!

post #50 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
 

Utah?

 

One word!

 

Snowbasin!

 

 

It's possible, but they don't have the greatest record at Christmas.

post #51 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 
Around EpicSki, there are far more advanced skiers than true "experts."  Meaning folks who are very comfortable on any complex terrain in any conditions.  An expert can take the tram up to the top of Lone Peak at Big Sky and ski down any line regardless of snow conditions or visibility.  An advanced skier might start with Liberty before deciding which other areas to explore that day.  An expert who goes to Big Sky for Christmas and finds the tram never opens due to low snow conditions might be disappointed..

 

Drat! There goes me and all of Big Sky ski patrol. I went back to the tram the last day, figuring I wanted one last run there. It was technically still open, but there were big signs about how dangerous it was - not just the usual signs. So I asked the lifties (trammies?) how bad it really was - sheer ice?  They told me that ski patrol was riding down in the tram because they didn't want to ski it. Total boilerplate. At that point I decided discretion was the better part of valor. They officially closed the tram a few minutes later.

 

I always figure that "any" definition has some caveats. There's always "I could probably do it, but would it be any fun?"

 

The difference between expert and advanced is so vague. This is where listing specific runs, as the OP did for the kids, is very helpful.

post #52 of 52
I have to agree with preceding post especially the "I could probably do it, but would it be any fun?" and disagree with post that said "An expert can take the tram up to the top of Lone Peak at Big Sky and ski down any line regardless of snow conditions or visibility." I skied Big Sky on 3/2/2015, a day with good visibility, but low enough snowpack that the Colouirs were closed. If the visibility had been more challenging going into the North Snowfields, they may have needed to use my contact information. This was on consecutive day 10 of a 19 ski-day trip that including double-diamond terrain at Kicking Horse and Lake Louise, plus Delirium Dive at Sunshine Village. See http://www.firsttracksonline.com/boards/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=11742 for trip report for the day at Big Sky. While some of my problem that day was route finding, bad visibility would have led to way more serious consequences than a bad middle or 2nd quarter in a 4000' vertical run.
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