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marijuana in the work place - Page 3

post #61 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

 

Yep, I try very carefully to stick to that mythical 9 mph tolerance over the limit hoping that if I do get stopped it won't be a big deal..... the same as most casual pot smokers try to keep personal possession down under that x grams limit where it changes from a written ticket to an arrest and possible distribution charges.


Under .5oz in North Carolina is a misdemeanor and a max $200 fine and no possible jail time unless they somehow pin a distribution charge on you (100 cases of zip lock bags, multiple scales, etc).

post #62 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

Yep, I try very carefully to stick to that mythical 9 mph tolerance over the limit hoping that if I do get stopped it won't be a big deal..... the same as most casual pot smokers try to keep personal possession down under that x grams limit where it changes from a written ticket to an arrest and possible distribution charges.

Note the Germans also have sections of highway without speed limit. Let the user regulate when safe to do so, and compliance when safety standards are in place is likely to be much higher. The Germans are much more sensible about human nature, though, than are Americans. We prefer prohibition and repression expressed as moral superiority.

You know one drug I won't keep in my house? Tylenol.

Because there is no antidote for an OD. I had an uncle in law who decided to commit suicide years ago with Tylenol. He woke up with a changed mind, but you don't get to change your mind with Tylenol.

Suicide is now #3 for cause of death ages 10-24. Marijuana? Not on the list, or any list, because unlike every other drug, nobody dies from it.
post #63 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by x10003q View Post
 


Under .5oz in North Carolina is a misdemeanor and a max $200 fine and no possible jail time unless they somehow pin a distribution charge on you (100 cases of zip lock bags, multiple scales, etc).


I had no problem accepting that risk to partake when I was in my late teens and early 20s.  However, they can still take you to jail and make you pay the $200 right then if they feel like being jerks about something.  I have a friend that is one of the best defense attorneys in the area for these types of things.  I hope my kids never need me to call in a favor there but I do have that resource if necessary.

post #64 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post

So, as it happens, my mom is German, and I'm sure that had a lot to do with why my parents were fine with the idea of me drinking at home. And in turn, why I didn't ever want to. To be honest, I had seen my parents sloppy drunk a number of times, and it held zero appeal for me. I still haven't ever gotten drunk enough to throw up or to have a major hangover the next day. And why @crgildart
 's son's friend may actually avoid abusing pot ... because seeing your parents out of control is unpleasant, even if they're happily stumbling drunk.

Wow, I've really made my parents look terrible in this thread. Believe me, they are great, fun people!

However, it's disingenuous to suggest (if you are doing so) that Germans don't get drunk. Maybe your wife's microclimate. I never saw anybody as sloppy drunk as when I visited my grandparents in East Germany a couple of years after the wall came down. I went to a club (hah, I was 14) and saw any number of mid-20s people who were just a mess, and one who had terrible scars from driving dangerously on the windy mountain roads there. The possible explanation: they grew up in a Communist state, knowing that they would be assigned a job and never having to plan for the future. So then suddenly, the wall came down, and they had FREEDOM! They could do anything they wanted to do! Except of course that they had never been prepared for it and had no idea how to go about getting a job, planning for the future, etc. Capitalism tore those kids apart. I wonder how they're doing today. Then again, it's disingenuous for me to compare those 20somethings to your wife, who presumably grew up in West Germany.

Well, it is also disingenuous for me to suggest that teens in 1980's southern Germany bear much resemblance to the German youth of today smile.gif. And yes, adults are the worst...we display what we expect our kids to avoid.

So you get me there, although, it is a good illustration. Most of what keeps adolescent childhood under control is parents at home, and the loss of parents at home to dual income models, with their subsequent guilt-gifting of completely inappropriate things like $250/mo drug budget allowances is, in my opinion and experience, the primary problem, at least for the economically advantaged.

The working poor have never had the option, and those kids have to commit crimes to get the allowance.
post #65 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post


That clearly sounds like a parental problem, not the school's. Unless the sleepover was at the school?

Most if not all schools make students sign a code of conduct in order to participate in sports, cheerleading, etc. That document will have wording about refraining from drugs and alcohol (among other things), and at least in our school district, the penalties are harsh. As in, off the team even if you have not partaken in said substance. Just being around the illegal (minor) use of it (eg, at a party) will do it. 

 

I don't agree with this, but I guess it's the easy way out. We had to do the same in high school, but we could be at parties with booze as long as we weren't drinking. Then we could buy beer at 18, though, so it wasn't a given that all beer was illegally obtained. But yeah, even if you were 18, during your season, you couldn't break code without consequence. 

post #66 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

That clearly sounds like a parental problem, not the school's. Unless the sleepover was at the school?

Most if not all schools make students sign a code of conduct in order to participate in sports, cheerleading, etc. That document will have wording about refraining from drugs and alcohol (among other things), and at least in our school district, the penalties are harsh. As in, off the team even if you have not partaken in said substance. Just being around the illegal (minor) use of it (eg, at a party) will do it. 

I don't agree with this, but I guess it's the easy way out. We had to do the same in high school, but we could be at parties with booze as long as we weren't drinking. Then we could buy beer at 18, though, so it wasn't a given that all beer was illegally obtained. But yeah, even if you were 18, during your season, you couldn't break code without consequence. 

There wasn't any of that at my high school (way back then), but I was on the dawn patrol surf team and weekend mountain sports teams - both unaffiliated with school. cool.gif
post #67 of 75
@@segbrown posted this to the other MJ thread. Reposted here for relevance. Please read it.

http://www.si.com/more-sports/2015/06/18/special-report-painkillers-young-athletes-heroin-addicts

A relevant excerpt:
Quote:
According to the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, a full 80% of all users arrive at heroin after abusing opioid painkillers such as OxyContin, Percocet and Vicodin. And according to the National Institute of Drug Abuse, one in 15 people who take nonmedical prescription painkillers will try heroin within the next 10 years.

I wonder, can you get fired for taking prescription OxyContin and having it in your blood while on the job?

How about addiction?
Quote:
Families consistently said that they received no warning from physicians about the addictive power of the opioid painkillers they prescribed. Patrick Trevor recalls that the doctor who prescribed Roxy for him jokingly said, "You got the good stuff." Trevor adds, "I didn't really put two and two together until later ... when I was a full-blown heroin addict. I knew painkillers were not good, but I didn't know how crazy addictive they were."
post #68 of 75
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NayBreak View Post

@@segbrown posted this to the other MJ thread. Reposted here for relevance. Please read it.

http://www.si.com/more-sports/2015/06/18/special-report-painkillers-young-athletes-heroin-addicts

A relevant excerpt:
I wonder, can you get fired for taking prescription OxyContin and having it in your blood while on the job?

How about addiction?

Those are very sad stories. It is frightening that those drugs are prescribed for minor injuries. I see similar patterns from some docs in my work. I deal with Workers' Compensation claims. There are docs who prescribe multiple medications for years after a surgery in response to subjective reports of pain with no plan or attempts to wean people off these meds.


Yes, you can get fired for having prescription meds in your system if you do not have a prescription for that drug. If you test positive for a prescription drug, most companies require that you show proof of a current prescription.
post #69 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 

Most if not all schools make students sign a code of conduct in order to participate in sports, cheerleading, etc. That document will have wording about refraining from drugs and alcohol (among other things), and at least in our school district, the penalties are harsh. As in, off the team even if you have not partaken in said substance. Just being around the illegal (minor) use of it (eg, at a party) will do it. 

 

I don't agree with this, but I guess it's the easy way out. We had to do the same in high school, but we could be at parties with booze as long as we weren't drinking. Then we could buy beer at 18, though, so it wasn't a given that all beer was illegally obtained. But yeah, even if you were 18, during your season, you couldn't break code without consequence. 

 

 

Interesting that punishment for recreational activities which are part of normal teenage development (assuming that in most of the world teenagers aren't straight edge square nor totally feral) is as harsh as those taking PEDs (or maybe harsher given the vast number of pro US sportsmen that have clearly slipped through the net having juiced in teenage years).  

post #70 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by NayBreak View Post
 
So you get me there, although, it is a good illustration. Most of what keeps adolescent childhood under control is parents at home, and the loss of parents at home to dual income models, with their subsequent guilt-gifting of completely inappropriate things like $250/mo drug budget allowances is, in my opinion and experience, the primary problem, at least for the economically advantaged.

The working poor have never had the option, and those kids have to commit crimes to get the allowance.

 

I'm having trouble counting all the instances of hyperbole and opinions stated as facts in your post ... 

post #71 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatbob View Post
 

 

 

Interesting that punishment for recreational activities which are part of normal teenage development (assuming that in most of the world teenagers aren't straight edge square nor totally feral) is as harsh as those taking PEDs (or maybe harsher given the vast number of pro US sportsmen that have clearly slipped through the net having juiced in teenage years).  

I should probably clarify what I said about disagreeing with school policy. What I disagree with is the blanket punishment. I am fine with student athletes being required to adhere to code during the season. And it isn't just school policy, anyone attending a party with alcohol will receive a minor in possession from police, whether or not they are in possession OR have had anything to drink at all. To me, a big part of education and growing up is learning when to say no in the face of ... uh ... activities. Not just wiping it all out, that's not reality. 

post #72 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by NayBreak View Post

@@segbrown posted this to the other MJ thread. Reposted here for relevance. Please read it.

http://www.si.com/more-sports/2015/06/18/special-report-painkillers-young-athletes-heroin-addicts

A relevant excerpt:
Quote:
According to the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, a full 80% of all users arrive at heroin after abusing opioid painkillers such as OxyContin, Percocet and Vicodin. And according to the National Institute of Drug Abuse, one in 15 people who take nonmedical prescription painkillers will try heroin within the next 10 years.

I wonder, can you get fired for taking prescription OxyContin and having it in your blood while on the job?

How about addiction?
Quote:
Families consistently said that they received no warning from physicians about the addictive power of the opioid painkillers they prescribed. Patrick Trevor recalls that the doctor who prescribed Roxy for him jokingly said, "You got the good stuff." Trevor adds, "I didn't really put two and two together until later ... when I was a full-blown heroin addict. I knew painkillers were not good, but I didn't know how crazy addictive they were."


That's what's wrong with 'murica" today.  Blame someone else.  I have no sympathy for someone who decided to take pain meds and then blames the doctor for prescribing them.  Don't want to be addicted to pain killers?  Stop taking them, when you don't need them for pain.   

post #73 of 75

^^^ ha ha.  Wasn't like that.  They just said take acetomenaphen or tylenol, and I told them that did not work for me at all. 

2nd time Doc asked me what I was doing for pain and I said I had a double scotch before bed.  They did show some concern for my scotch addiction, but failed to prescribe an alternative.  Pissed me off because my drug plan would have covered percocets, but not Lagavulin.:hopmad:

post #74 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by NayBreak View Post

@@segbrown posted this to the other MJ thread. Reposted here for relevance. Please read it.

http://www.si.com/more-sports/2015/06/18/special-report-painkillers-young-athletes-heroin-addicts


A relevant excerpt:
Quote:
According to the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, a full 80% of all users arrive at heroin after abusing opioid painkillers such as OxyContin, Percocet and Vicodin. And according to the National Institute of Drug Abuse, one in 15 people who take nonmedical prescription painkillers will try heroin within the next 10 years.


I wonder, can you get fired for taking prescription OxyContin and having it in your blood while on the job?


How about addiction?
Quote:
Families consistently said that they received no warning from physicians about the addictive power of the opioid painkillers they prescribed. Patrick Trevor recalls that the doctor who prescribed Roxy for him jokingly said, "You got the good stuff." Trevor adds, "I didn't really put two and two together until later ... when I was a full-blown heroin addict. I knew painkillers were not good, but I didn't know how crazy addictive they were."


That's what's wrong with 'murica" today.  Blame someone else.  I have no sympathy for someone who decided to take pain meds and then blames the doctor for prescribing them.  Don't want to be addicted to pain killers?  Stop taking them, when you don't need them for pain.

Canada is number one or number two in per capita opiod use. Depends how it's measured.
screen-shot-2013-04-01-at-9-54-10-am.png
http://annamehlerpaperny.com/2013/03/26/1013/

Researchers sound alarm: Opioid painkiller deaths escalating in Ontario
CTVNews.ca Staff
Published Monday, July 7, 2014

Over 500 deaths per year in Ontario from prescription pain killers.
post #75 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post


Canada is number one or number two in per capita opiod use. Depends how it's measured.


Over 500 deaths per year in Ontario from prescription pain killers.

 

You know, I'm surprised by this information, but at the same time I'm not.  They're fairly freely prescribed and usually free of charge.  I'd have hoped we'd have known better, but apparently not.

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