or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Where to Ski/Live this winter
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Where to Ski/Live this winter

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

Need some advice as to where to ski for a 2-3 months this winter. My wife and I work remotely, travel full-time, and spent about half of last winter in Vermont. I found a pretty good deal on a room in a shared house 10 minutes from Sugarbush. It worked great (and we had an unbelievable season from February onward), but I want to explore out west this year. 

 

Here's my details: I'm a good, but not great skiier (i.e. can ski anything on the mountain, if someone's there to push me, but not seeking out anything extreme or challenging -- give me a nice variety of cruisers, some medium grade moguls, and some occasional tree-skiing and I'm happy). My wife is a beginner -- hoping to get her down blues with another season, but for now it's greens only for her, which definitely eliminates some of the cool looking smaller places that don't have many green trails.

 

I work a normal office job, but can usually arrange my hours to be something like 6am to 130 or 2pm and get a couple hours of skiing in on weekdays. Which means the faster I can get to the slopes the better.   Cost of accommodations close to the slopes, and the speed from parking to slope are important. As of course is the cost of the ski pass.

 

I'm currently leaning towards getting epic passes and spending a month-ish in Summit county, a month-ish in Utah, and maybe a couple weeks near Tahoe. It seems like I should be able to find a place to stay relatively cheap if I'm willing to be 20-30 minutes away (frisco, silverthorn, closer to SLC) and I love being able to explore multiple places this winter. I have a good job and my budget is by no means super low, but I genuinely have no idea what (any kind of) accommodation for a month will cost in the winter in these places. 2k? 3k?

 

Does my epic pass plan make sense? Are there other places I should consider? 

And what's the best way going to be to find accomodation for 2-4 weeks these places? VRBO, craigslist, airbnb?

post #2 of 27
@Fuller came from Florida to spend a month here last year and plans to repeat that this year. His rented house from VRBO was about ten minutes from the slopes. Passes here are $620 and not part of the Epic pass. They do include five days at Red Lodge.

That being said, the current seasonal forecast for here is as bad as last winter's.
post #3 of 27

Have you skied out west before?  Western skiing is great but you should be aware of some of the differences.  For example, most big western ski areas do not have free convenient parking like eastern ones.  Free parking typically requires a shuttle and often walking through a village after the shuttle.  (for $20/day or so you can skip the shuttle)  I suspect this will be a big deal if your leaving for skiing at 2pm. 

 

Options to overcome these parking issues are 1) ski at the smaller areas with better parking or 2) stay at the base of the mountain and ski most of the time at that one area.  I suspect you'd be happier with the 2nd option but it may cost a lot.

 

The epic pass is a good deal and the ski areas have the terrain you're looking for.  In CO, Keystone has the easiest parking (no shuttle, only a village to walk through.)  Keystone is not busy week days and on weekends you could ski any of the Epic areas.

 

I don't think you'll find a better deal than the Epic pass if you're looking to ski a lot of different areas.  Your other options would be to choose a single area and buy a season pass.  The biggest negative of the Epic areas is that they're busy.  I didn't check prices on season passes, but other options that have good terrain for you include: Steamboat, Aspen(4 ski areas), Telluride, Big Sky, Purgatory/Wolf (shared pass).  These are are low crowd areas.  If Canada is an option: Banff (Sunshine Village, Norway, Lake Louise), Whistler, Sun Peaks, Big White, Panorama, Red.  If size isn't that important, there are a ton of smaller areas you could consider too like Sunshine or Monarch in CO.


Edited by nathanvg - 6/13/15 at 10:39am
post #4 of 27

Trouble with smaller areas like Monarch, Wolf Creek, Abasin, Loveland, etc. is that there is no slope side accommodation. That makes them less crowded and more "local" in feel, but a 20 minute drive from most housing.

 

Same for staying in Frisco or Silverthorne. Breck or Keystone would be better. Close enough to Frisco and Silverthorne for shopping and whatnot, but with walk to lifts options.

 

Telluride has the easiest commute. lots of options for housing on mountain or in the town with lift/gondola going right up the mountain from downtown. Great terrain for the aspiring advanced skier and for a beginner. Not so easy commute if they have to travel occasionally for work though.

 

Steamboat has lots of housing on the mountain or in town. Town to slopes is an easy bus ride, but still 15-20 minutes depending on where you are on the bus route and how many stops, etc. Also great intermediate terrain.

 

Winter park has inexpensive housing (relatively), some on slope condos or walk in ski out stuff in old town. and parking next to the slopes is (shhhhhh!) is free at Mary Jane, with easy access on week days. The Rocky mountain super pass would give unlimited skiing at Winter Park/Mary Jane for the weekdays and then Copper and Steamboat for weekend excursions if they get bored and want to wander. Terrific blues and greens on the WP side and plenty of challenge at MJ.

 

Copper is a great mountain, but the whole park and shuttle and walk business would be tough for OP's needs and the base village is fine for a vacation, but IMO, too isolated to be someplace you'd want to live for months at a time. Someone who knows it better than I may have a different opinion though.

post #5 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom View Post
 

Copper is a great mountain, but the whole park and shuttle and walk business would be tough for OP's needs and the base village is fine for a vacation, but IMO, too isolated to be someplace you'd want to live for months at a time. Someone who knows it better than I may have a different opinion though.

I sort of disagree about parking-shuttle-walk to slopes at Copper. 

 

The OP says access to easy terrain is important for spouse.  And we know what that means.

 

At Copper you can park very close to shuttle bus stop. Taking the GREEN shuttle will drop you off where you can walk 100 feet or so over level asphalt.  Drop your skis on the snow and slide into the (Union Creek) lift line. One of the best high-speed lifts that will access almost all easy terrain.  GREEN terrain is all around you.  A short run will take you to the Timberline lift with access to more advanced terrain. 

 

There is 'pay' parking near the Union Creek lift but you need to walk further than if you park in shuttle lot.

post #6 of 27
Agree about Copper - that is an ideal mountain for a beginner paired with a good skier who wants to drop into some more difficult terrain and wants a variety of cruisers. It's just about all fall line skiing, so no typical wear out a beginner with tons of traversing.

Now you can't travel much on the RMSP, but it's worth looking at.
post #7 of 27

Epic pass is probably the best option for a pass if you want to explore Colorado and Utah, I would skip Tahoe unless El Nino is going to be strong and I spend the winter in Tahoe these days only cause I like kite surfing in big waves in Santa Cruz, crowds can be avoided for the most part by avoiding busy periods, powder days though are ridiculously crowded at most Epic pass resorts.

post #8 of 27

Based on the OP's details I would say Copper is exactly what he is looking for.   As for the other concerns well, I agree with Ali about parking.  Union Creek parking lot is close to where you want to be but it is probably $20 to park there at least 80% of the time.  If you are ok with a shuttle bus then, as Ali stated,  the free parking lot might actually be easier for you.  Accommodation costs at Copper for 2 or 3 months might not be cheap.  I would suggest going to their web page and getting the numbers for them and their partners and calling them and try to negotiate something.  I'm fairly sure if you try to do it online you will get a per night price.  Often you can negotiate parking, lift tickets, lodging in a package deal.  Their partners can also give you advice on cheaper accommodations close by.  If you stay at Copper you will have a 5-10 mile drive to Frisco/Silverthorne.  A bit more to other close by areas like Breck or Vail.

 

Good luck with your decision.

post #9 of 27
I suggest get an Epic or Epic local pass.
Find accomodations in Summit Cove near Keystone and buy the Kesystone lesson pass for your wife. You can ski Keystone during the week after work and explore the other resorts during the week. Another option is to find housing in Breck or Blue River and make Breck your main mountain. Hopefully, with some mileage your wife will be off the greens quickly.

You might be able to find reasonable lodging at Keystone.
Edited by skier31 - 6/14/15 at 5:43am
post #10 of 27
^^^
Do the lesson passes have to be purchased well in advance?

I'd get the Epic pass, then just go where ever has the best snow.
When do you plan on going?
post #11 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

^^^
Do the lesson passes have to be purchased well in advance?

I'd get the Epic pass, then just go where ever has the best snow.
When do you plan on going?

 

They sell them in the fall but usually you have to buy them prior to the season starting.  They sometimes sell out.

post #12 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier31 View Post

I suggest get an Epic or Epic local pass.
Find accomodations in Summit Cove near Keystone and buy the Kesystone lesson pass for your wife. You can ski Keystone during the week after work and explore the other resorts during the week. Another option is to find housing in Breck or Blue River and make Breck your main mountain. Hopefully, with some mileage your wife will be off the greens quickly.

You might be able to find reasonable lodging at Keystone.

Agree with skier31. Keystone is a good fit for a quick 2 hours onslope in the pm and then proximity to tons of other places on the weekend.

 

If you stop working at 2pm, get in your car, drive the 20 to 40 minutes to copper (at least that's how long it takes me, depending on weather and also googlemaps estimate is 33 mins), park, take the shuttle etc. you won't have much mid-week skiing. Also, Copper is a terrific mountain, in part because the terrain is well separated by "ability." That's good because you don't have hotshots running over beginners changing "course" (forgive me ). But it also means that it's harder for the two of them to ski together. "I'll take the bump run and meet you where they intersect honey" kind of thing.

post #13 of 27

Is there any way you can ski the first 2 hr of the day instead of the last 2?

post #14 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmelton94 View Post
 

Epic pass is probably the best option for a pass if you want to explore Colorado and Utah, I would skip Tahoe unless El Nino is going to be strong and I spend the winter in Tahoe these days only cause I like kite surfing in big waves in Santa Cruz, crowds can be avoided for the most part by avoiding busy periods, powder days though are ridiculously crowded at most Epic pass resorts.

 

I've read some articles suggesting that El Nino *is* strong right now, and that's why Colorado is getting such an unusual "bounty" of summer rain. 

 

http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2015/04/16/long-awaited-el-nino-may-bring-drought-busting-rain-to-northern-california-by-2016/

 

http://www.dailycamera.com/weather/ci_28304291/boulder-county-far-ahead-average-precipitation-el-nino

 

I don't know how much faith to put in that first article, but *fingers crossed*.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skier31 View Post

I suggest get an Epic or Epic local pass.
Find accomodations in Summit Cove near Keystone and buy the Kesystone lesson pass for your wife. You can ski Keystone during the week after work and explore the other resorts during the week. Another option is to find housing in Breck or Blue River and make Breck your main mountain. Hopefully, with some mileage your wife will be off the greens quickly.

You might be able to find reasonable lodging at Keystone.

 

Does the Keystone lesson pass extend down to green skiers? If so, this sounds like a winner. I think OP said his wife is still skiing greens so far.

 

I agree with @segbrown that morning runs are much higher quality - and lighter crowds - than afternoon runs. In the spring, switching to afternoons might make sense.

post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post

I've read some articles suggesting that El Nino *is* strong right now, and that's why Colorado is getting such an unusual "bounty" of summer rain. 

http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2015/04/16/long-awaited-el-nino-may-bring-drought-busting-rain-to-northern-california-by-2016/

http://www.dailycamera.com/weather/ci_28304291/boulder-county-far-ahead-average-precipitation-el-nino

I don't know how much faith to put in that first article, but *fingers crossed*.


Does the Keystone lesson pass extend down to green skiers? If so, this sounds like a winner. I think OP said his wife is still skiing greens so far.

I agree with @segbrown
 that morning runs are much higher quality - and lighter crowds - than afternoon runs. In the spring, switching to afternoons might make sense.

If the lesson pass starts at Level 5, she should be able to do that after some mileage and perhaps a few regular group lessons.
post #16 of 27
Thread Starter 

Wow, thanks for all the great replies everyone!!! I haven't really skiied out west before (since I was a kid) and didn't really know the parking situation was different out west. Out east you can show up on a weekday in the afternoon and park 100 yards from the lift at most. Maybe I'll try to get walk-to-lift accommodation for at least some of the time I'm out there.

 

No, unfortunately, first two hours of the day doesn't really work for my work schedule in general. Believe me I skied many a day last winter that would have been much better if I could have showed up 4 hours earlier, but I just have to be glad that I can get out at all on a workday. I'm sort of hoping I can get even more flexibility this winter and be able to put in a few hours in the evening instead of the morning, but that may be a pipe dream.

 

I think the more we talk about it, the more we're settled on wanting to go to multiple places this winter, which I think means epic pass is by far the cheapest way to do it. 

 

The Keystone lesson pass sounds pretty incredible. Even if my wife doesn't get one, I may do it for myself. I'm probably a level 8 or 9 and I know my technique could use a lot of work... Ihad in my head that Keystone was a mediocre 'family' type place, but looking at it, it looks like they have some pretty decent stuff and trees on their back side. Definitely enough to keep me interested on a short week day anyway.

 

I was thinking about getting the Epic Local pass -- I hate skiing holiday periods anyway, so I don't care about the black out dates. That leaves the vail/beaver creek 10 day max as the only meaningful restriction. If I'm thinking I'll be based in CO for 1.5-2 months max, probably based near Keystone, do you think I'll want to ski vail/beaver creek more than 10 total days? I know Vails it he "biggest" and "nicest" of the epic resorts in CO, but 10 days seems plenty if I'm splitting my weekends between Vail, Breck and A-Basin.

 

Oh another question I have about Keystone. Is night skiing just a gimmick? It seems like if I get on the mountain at 2, then it'd be nice to have some stuff open til later, but is it actually enjoyable skiing?

post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Besnik View Post
 

Wow, thanks for all the great replies everyone!!! I haven't really skiied out west before (since I was a kid) and didn't really know the parking situation was different out west. Out east you can show up on a weekday in the afternoon and park 100 yards from the lift at most. Maybe I'll try to get walk-to-lift accommodation for at least some of the time I'm out there.....

You can do that at ABasin for sure. 

post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Besnik View Post
 

Need some advice as to where to ski for a 2-3 months this winter. My wife and I work remotely, travel full-time, and spent about half of last winter in Vermont. I found a pretty good deal on a room in a shared house 10 minutes from Sugarbush. It worked great (and we had an unbelievable season from February onward), but I want to explore out west this year. 

 

Here's my details: I'm a good, but not great skiier (i.e. can ski anything on the mountain, if someone's there to push me, but not seeking out anything extreme or challenging -- give me a nice variety of cruisers, some medium grade moguls, and some occasional tree-skiing and I'm happy). My wife is a beginner -- hoping to get her down blues with another season, but for now it's greens only for her, which definitely eliminates some of the cool looking smaller places that don't have many green trails.

 

I work a normal office job, but can usually arrange my hours to be something like 6am to 130 or 2pm and get a couple hours of skiing in on weekdays. Which means the faster I can get to the slopes the better.   Cost of accommodations close to the slopes, and the speed from parking to slope are important. As of course is the cost of the ski pass.

 

I'm currently leaning towards getting epic passes and spending a month-ish in Summit county, a month-ish in Utah, and maybe a couple weeks near Tahoe. It seems like I should be able to find a place to stay relatively cheap if I'm willing to be 20-30 minutes away (frisco, silverthorn, closer to SLC) and I love being able to explore multiple places this winter. I have a good job and my budget is by no means super low, but I genuinely have no idea what (any kind of) accommodation for a month will cost in the winter in these places. 2k? 3k?

 

Does my epic pass plan make sense? Are there other places I should consider? 

And what's the best way going to be to find accomodation for 2-4 weeks these places? VRBO, craigslist, airbnb?

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Besnik View Post
 

Wow, thanks for all the great replies everyone!!! I haven't really skiied out west before (since I was a kid) and didn't really know the parking situation was different out west. Out east you can show up on a weekday in the afternoon and park 100 yards from the lift at most. Maybe I'll try to get walk-to-lift accommodation for at least some of the time I'm out there.

 

No, unfortunately, first two hours of the day doesn't really work for my work schedule in general. Believe me I skied many a day last winter that would have been much better if I could have showed up 4 hours earlier, but I just have to be glad that I can get out at all on a workday. I'm sort of hoping I can get even more flexibility this winter and be able to put in a few hours in the evening instead of the morning, but that may be a pipe dream.

 

I think the more we talk about it, the more we're settled on wanting to go to multiple places this winter, which I think means epic pass is by far the cheapest way to do it. 

 

The Keystone lesson pass sounds pretty incredible. Even if my wife doesn't get one, I may do it for myself. I'm probably a level 8 or 9 and I know my technique could use a lot of work... Ihad in my head that Keystone was a mediocre 'family' type place, but looking at it, it looks like they have some pretty decent stuff and trees on their back side. Definitely enough to keep me interested on a short week day anyway.

 

I was thinking about getting the Epic Local pass -- I hate skiing holiday periods anyway, so I don't care about the black out dates. That leaves the vail/beaver creek 10 day max as the only meaningful restriction. If I'm thinking I'll be based in CO for 1.5-2 months max, probably based near Keystone, do you think I'll want to ski vail/beaver creek more than 10 total days? I know Vails it he "biggest" and "nicest" of the epic resorts in CO, but 10 days seems plenty if I'm splitting my weekends between Vail, Breck and A-Basin.

 

Oh another question I have about Keystone. Is night skiing just a gimmick? It seems like if I get on the mountain at 2, then it'd be nice to have some stuff open til later, but is it actually enjoyable skiing?


Welcome to EpicSki!  I suggest you read the articles by Jim Kenney about his 2-month stay in Colorado Feb-Mar 2015.  Here is the first one:

http://www.epicski.com/a/2015-geezer-ski-bum-tour-epicski-1

 

JimK was on his own the first month, then had a condo rented for month when his non-skiing wife joined him.  They stayed in Silverthorne.  Somewhere he has a planning thread that probably has relevant info.  You could also send a PM to @Jamesj with questions.

 

For SLC, there are plenty of lodging options in the city or in Park City on VRBO.  If your wife is likely to want to ski without you, perhaps for group lessons, then staying in Park City makes more sense.  Can always drive over to LCC or BCC or to the Ogden Valley (Snowbasin, Powder Mountain) a few times.

post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Besnik View Post
 

Wow, thanks for all the great replies everyone!!! I haven't really skiied out west before (since I was a kid) and didn't really know the parking situation was different out west. Out east you can show up on a weekday in the afternoon and park 100 yards from the lift at most. Maybe I'll try to get walk-to-lift accommodation for at least some of the time I'm out there.

 

No, unfortunately, first two hours of the day doesn't really work for my work schedule in general. Believe me I skied many a day last winter that would have been much better if I could have showed up 4 hours earlier, but I just have to be glad that I can get out at all on a workday. I'm sort of hoping I can get even more flexibility this winter and be able to put in a few hours in the evening instead of the morning, but that may be a pipe dream.

 

I think the more we talk about it, the more we're settled on wanting to go to multiple places this winter, which I think means epic pass is by far the cheapest way to do it. 

 

The Keystone lesson pass sounds pretty incredible. Even if my wife doesn't get one, I may do it for myself. I'm probably a level 8 or 9 and I know my technique could use a lot of work... Ihad in my head that Keystone was a mediocre 'family' type place, but looking at it, it looks like they have some pretty decent stuff and trees on their back side. Definitely enough to keep me interested on a short week day anyway.

 

I was thinking about getting the Epic Local pass -- I hate skiing holiday periods anyway, so I don't care about the black out dates. That leaves the vail/beaver creek 10 day max as the only meaningful restriction. If I'm thinking I'll be based in CO for 1.5-2 months max, probably based near Keystone, do you think I'll want to ski vail/beaver creek more than 10 total days? I know Vails it he "biggest" and "nicest" of the epic resorts in CO, but 10 days seems plenty if I'm splitting my weekends between Vail, Breck and A-Basin.

 

Oh another question I have about Keystone. Is night skiing just a gimmick? It seems like if I get on the mountain at 2, then it'd be nice to have some stuff open til later, but is it actually enjoyable skiing?

 

10 days should be plenty. 

 

I have never skied at night so can't answer that question. 

post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Besnik View Post
 

The Keystone lesson pass sounds pretty incredible. Even if my wife doesn't get one, I may do it for myself. I'm probably a level 8 or 9 and I know my technique could use a lot of work... Ihad in my head that Keystone was a mediocre 'family' type place, but looking at it, it looks like they have some pretty decent stuff and trees on their back side. Definitely enough to keep me interested on a short week day anyway.

 

I was thinking about getting the Epic Local pass -- I hate skiing holiday periods anyway, so I don't care about the black out dates. That leaves the vail/beaver creek 10 day max as the only meaningful restriction. If I'm thinking I'll be based in CO for 1.5-2 months max, probably based near Keystone, do you think I'll want to ski vail/beaver creek more than 10 total days? I know Vails it he "biggest" and "nicest" of the epic resorts in CO, but 10 days seems plenty if I'm splitting my weekends between Vail, Breck and A-Basin.

 

Oh another question I have about Keystone. Is night skiing just a gimmick? It seems like if I get on the mountain at 2, then it'd be nice to have some stuff open til later, but is it actually enjoyable skiing?

 

I have some pretty aggro friends who enjoy Keystone. If I were looking for gnar, I'd probably go to Keystone rather than Vail ...

 

Breck also has a lesson pass, although its terms differ from Keystone's for the coming season. The I-70 corridor isn't known for its gnar, but of the choices available, Breck definitely has plenty of challenging terrain, with the five peaks giving you lots to explore.

 

I don't know what you mean by "nicest" of the epic resorts. If you mean huge blue/black back bowls, sure. Vail also has a well-deserved reputation for tons of traversing. I suppose that could be nice if you're a masochist. But if by "nice" you mean luxurious, go to Beaver Creek. If you mean difficult terrain, go to A Basin or Breck or (probably, I honestly haven't explored it) Keystone. If you mean plenty of greens, Vail has that, but so do Keystone and Beaver Creek and Breck. In fact, for your wife, peak 7 at Breck, with its mild yet fun blues, is probably a fantastic fit, or will be with a couple of lessons.

 

There's nothing wrong with Vail - it's a huge resort with lots of fun skiing - but don't fall into the tourist trap of thinking it's the holy of holies. I didn't even go to Vail this season, and I didn't miss it one bit. If I'd had friends who insisted on skiing Vail, I might have gone, and would have had a great time.

 

Depending on how tight your finances are, you could also consider getting both an Epic variant and the RMSP(+). That's what I've done the last few years. I live near Boulder and rent a condo in walking distance to Breck's Peak 9. I mostly ski Breck, but I enjoy Copper, which isn't terribly far, has lots of fun terrain, and is almost always less crowded. I switched from the full Epic to the Local because I really just don't care about Vail and Beaver Creek enough to drive the extra distance when I could walk out my door and be on a lift in five minutes. RMSP also has Winter Park, which is well-known for Mary Jane's bumps, but also has some truly fantastic tree skiing. I just personally find the wind situation in WP hard to tolerate (which is funny because "everyone" knows Breck is the windiest).

post #21 of 27

NIght skiing... can sometimes be butt cold, but often the visability can be much better than overcast flat light daytime conditions. I've always enjoyed night skiing, but it was part of the culture growing up. 

post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Besnik View Post
 

Need some advice as to where to ski for a 2-3 months this winter. My wife and I work remotely, travel full-time, and spent about half of last winter in Vermont. I found a pretty good deal on a room in a shared house 10 minutes from Sugarbush. It worked great (and we had an unbelievable season from February onward), but I want to explore out west this year. 

 

Here's my details: I'm a good, but not great skiier (i.e. can ski anything on the mountain, if someone's there to push me, but not seeking out anything extreme or challenging -- give me a nice variety of cruisers, some medium grade moguls, and some occasional tree-skiing and I'm happy). My wife is a beginner -- hoping to get her down blues with another season, but for now it's greens only for her, which definitely eliminates some of the cool looking smaller places that don't have many green trails.

 

I work a normal office job, but can usually arrange my hours to be something like 6am to 130 or 2pm and get a couple hours of skiing in on weekdays. Which means the faster I can get to the slopes the better.   Cost of accommodations close to the slopes, and the speed from parking to slope are important. As of course is the cost of the ski pass.

 

I'm currently leaning towards getting epic passes and spending a month-ish in Summit county, a month-ish in Utah, and maybe a couple weeks near Tahoe. It seems like I should be able to find a place to stay relatively cheap if I'm willing to be 20-30 minutes away (frisco, silverthorn, closer to SLC) and I love being able to explore multiple places this winter. I have a good job and my budget is by no means super low, but I genuinely have no idea what (any kind of) accommodation for a month will cost in the winter in these places. 2k? 3k?

 

Does my epic pass plan make sense? Are there other places I should consider? 

And what's the best way going to be to find accomodation for 2-4 weeks these places? VRBO, craigslist, airbnb?

A couple of comments:  Keystone would nicely facilitate your late day skiing schedule because it stays open until ~8pm.  Good for a fairly lengthy late ski session, but only on a limited number of frontside trails.  If you stay in Summit County accommodations for 30days or more you don't have to pay "motel" tax, saves ~11%.  I paid $3500 total for 30 days in a two bedroom townhouse with garage, hot tub, 2.5 baths, in Silverthorne in March 2015.  Lots of cheaper/smaller condos nearby, esp in Dillon area.  Location worked great, Keystone 15 minutes, A-Basin and Breck about 20-25, Vail and BC about 40-50.  There are ways to cope with parking, some places better than others.  I found it easy to avoid crowds 95% of the time by skiing high up on most mtns.  I enjoyed all the mtns, but esp Breckenridge due to good terrain and best snow of trip.  I had EpicPass and spent a total of nine weeks on the road, also spending about five days each in Utah (Park City/Canyons) and Tahoe (Heavenly/Kirkwood), and a side trip up to Jackson Hole for three ski days.  I used VRBO for my Silverthorne rental and committed to the Silverthorne townhouse in late Nov/early Dec time frame to ensure preferred dates.  I was very curious about the Keystone and Breck season lesson plans, but they had black out dates during my stay and I opted not to pursue. 

post #23 of 27

Keystone night skiing is cool.  It's hit or miss due to cold early in the season but I love it when you're "night" skiing in the sunlight in march. Ideally you'd ski non-lighted runs until 4 then extend the day with the limited lighted runs.  I typically do that skiing until 5 or 6.  In the late season, I find that they let you ski unlit runs at least a little past 4 too.

 

If you can get lodging at the base, you can get about 30 minutes more skiing per day by eliminating the time to drive, switch from shoes to boots and walk through village.

post #24 of 27

Sounds like you'll have fun whatever you decide to do! I think there's a lot to recommend the Epic Pass tour that's been discussed, and Keystone really is a great mountain--it gets badmouthed, I think, largely because it doesn't offer nearly as much to an expert skier as many other spots, but it sounds like you don't really need the expert-level terrain.

 

Limitations on free close-in parking might be standard overall throughout the West, but that definitely hasn't been my experience in Utah. Most of the Utah areas have abundant free close-in parking... with possible exceptions for the Park City areas.

 

All that said, I personally think I would choose to do this differently. The idea of living in a tourist village, travelling from one Vail resort to another, and dealing with the crowds sounds to me like it would feel like being a permanent tourist, and get exhausting. Given that you need to work mornings, I'd look for someplace more laid-back/affordable with weekday night skiing available (Powder Mountain, Nordic Valley, and Brighton fit the bill) and make that the home base for the trip. And then go out on shorter excursions/weekend trips to explore other areas around. Even if you're not going to be skiing very late into the evening most times, just being able to regularly extend the day to 5:00 or 5:30 means you can get a lot more skiing in. Your money and time will go quite a bit farther in the Nordic Valley/Powder Mountain area, and it strikes me as a much lower-stress way of trying the West.

post #25 of 27
Thread Starter 

Thanks everyone for the fantastic replies and advice!! Seems like Keystone is the best place for my weekday schedule. It's looking like we'll probably get an Epic Pass and do a couple of months in Colorado, possibly even more depending on some other things falling into place. And maybe do a week to a month in Park City.

 

We've talked about doing some of the smaller places (and even visited some places in ID and MT) to avoid the stress and crowds of the VR places, but I've pretty much only skiied 2 ski resorts (sugarbush and killington) in my life and I'm a little too enamored with the idea of being able to choose between 5 places in CO (and for less than half of what my pass cost back east) and it sounds from people's replies that I will have a great time in Summit county.
 

I really appreciate everyone taking the time and I'm looking forward to a great winter.

post #26 of 27

You said your hours you work are 6:00 to 2:00.  Since you were skiing east coast this past winter, I'm assuming that's eastern time.  If you are working for an eastern time employer/client.....remember...in CO or UT, you are 2 hours earlier.  So, you could work from 4:00 am to 12:00 noon, then get in 3-4 hours of afternoon skiing.

post #27 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bamaman View Post
 

You said your hours you work are 6:00 to 2:00.  Since you were skiing east coast this past winter, I'm assuming that's eastern time.  If you are working for an eastern time employer/client.....remember...in CO or UT, you are 2 hours earlier.  So, you could work from 4:00 am to 12:00 noon, then get in 3-4 hours of afternoon skiing.

 

Unfortunately no, the 6am to 2pm is Mountain time. Last winter I had a project that I needed to monitor in the evenings, so I could work 8am-2pm and then another couple hours in the evening, but I don't think it's likely to swing a similar deal this winter.

 

I have considered trying to do pacific time instead of mountain so that I can get an extra hour in on weekdays, but I'm not sure it's worth it unless I can find the right place.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Where to Ski/Live this winter