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Is the FIFA scandal an example of "Business as Usual" at the IOC and other Skiing Related International Sanctioning Bodies? - Page 2

post #31 of 45

FIFA, IOC, FIS or FIBA award games/competitions to best bidders to organize games. They are not in the business of providing long term profitability for the venues chosen to host the games.

 

They give them the chance - how are they going to utilize this chance is up to the organizer.

post #32 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by goranmilos View Post
 

FIFA, IOC, FIS or FIBA award games/competitions to best bidders to organize games. They are not in the business of providing long term profitability for the venues chosen to host the games.

 

They give them the chance - how are they going to utilize this chance is up to the organizer.


FIFA was given many chances throughout the years after fraud allegations were made.

post #33 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski otter View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

IOC will be next... Rotten to the core as well. Look at the number of winter venues that are just saying, "no".

One can only hope.  

 

I'm privy to little of an insider nature, but the winter Olympics In Sochi?  How completely inappropriate was that?  A lot of athletes facing much increased risk of injury from the foreseeable, untested/incompetent, Mickey Mouse venues there, including the halfpipe - in hindsight, high chance it was because of corruption, just as allegedly with FIFA championships going to Russia in 2018.  (With all due apologies to Mickey.)

Actually, no as @primoz has indicated. Their "mistake" was not hiring Snow Park Technologies, which was the premier builder of parks/pipe. Just because they're the best though doesn't mean someone else couldn't do it. But, it didn't work out great.

 

Mickey Mouse Venues??

The jumping and cross country venues are some of the best in the world.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post
 

As far as I know, that has nothing to do with Olympics.

Most Olympic venues throw their hat in the ring for more than political reasons, namely for the hope of increased future tourism. I was wondering how Sochi is advertised in Europe as a destination resort, and if there is a decent amount of tourism.  If not, it seems Putin was more interested in political gains. There is no doubt it was a successful Olympiad.

No one wants the Olympics in countries that have to answer to the public because they loose money. London - not sure what the outcome was, but they had most of the infrastructure. Beijing? the Birdcage stadium will probably fall down by 2020 from shoddy construction. It's China, they have money to throw around and on the whole, in terms of exposure, maybe it was worth it.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ski otter View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post
 

Ski Otter I don't know if you don't know this or you just ignore this, to make it look worse. All this what you are writing (except for weather conditions, which werent  all that bad comparing it to Vancouver for example) is not responsibility of Russia/Russians/Olympic organizer but guys responsible for building skiing courses. And believe it or not, these guys are not Russian but guys who are building these courses for every single Olympics or World championships.... in alpine skiing that would be Bernhard Russi and his team, and Olympics organizer doesn't have a vote on this. So if there's problem with courses and how they are planned, right address to complain is FIS and Mr. Russi, not Putin ;)

 

Objections were raised to this venue but ignored. 1) A hastily built, seaside resort ski area with no track record on both snow conditions and slope conditions, with, in fact, suspect snow conditions, no previous halfpipe or slope style builds, no advanced experience possible for anyone, local or not, was a poor selection. 

 

No one from outside could plan, inspect or gain needed experience with this venue, because it was being hastily finished behind schedule (due, allegedly, to both inexperience and graft) even as people, including those you mention, were needing to build, set up and practice.  

 

2)The resulting real problems were predictable, and were predicted by many.   

 

The selection committee(s) and site promoters ignored those with some common sense about all this including the tech folks you try to blame.  

 

At, say, Copper Mountain, the snow is good at known times of year.  At Copper, a team works with their well-worked Olympic half pipe over the whole season, multiple seasons, to coordinate the snow, angles, heights, slope, etc. with the evolving contestant needs, especially for safety.  It requires experience and adjustment over time - including localized experience and trail and error - again, over time - to get it right.  This is the opposite of the Sochi venue.  

 

3) So why select such a white elephant locale? Just politics (in this case, at the expense of results and safety)? Or also bribery? 

 

1) Not sure what "Hastily built" has to do with anything. Every Olympics pretty much has to build stuff these days as a Lake Placid approach isn't good enough apparently.

 

They built a rail line to the venues. Try to get that done in the US. Let's say Denver got them. You think we'd want to pay 10 Billion or whatever it would cost to build a rail line up into Summit/Eagle counties? Despite the fact it would be heavily used if cheap enough. Of course "cheap" would mean subsidies which half the people and Congress would have a fit over.

 

No track record on snow conditions? That's just not true. Just cause you didn't know about it doesn't mean much.

Cypress Mt., and Whistler are well known for possible problematic snow conditions. The pipe and moguls runs at Cypress were a near disaster. It was incredibly warm there. It is in fact seaside. The venues at Sochi were not on the Black Sea.

 

This is what they had to do at Cypress for the Olympics. Conditions were awful.

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/othersports/winter-olympics/7258165/Winter-Olympics-2010-officials-whitewash-their-mountain-of-problems.html

 

Cypress Mt. is actually on the coast:

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1245478/Mild-weather-Canada-forces-Vancouver-ship-tons-snow-Winter-Olympics.html

Here's how great the conditions were at Vancouver Olympics:

 

Quote:

23 January 2010

 

As spring flowers bloom early and birds start to nest around balmy Vancouver, officials there have chartered a fleet of helicopters to fly in thousands of tons of snow for the Winter Olympics.

 

Without the emergency snowlift, which is also shipping in tons of snow in convoys of giant lorries, Olympic chiefs feared they might have to abandon the Games that have already cost £1.5 billion and are due to start in three weeks....

 

 

Organisers admitted that they seriously  underestimated the impact of climate change when they picked the venue at Cypress Mountain, Vancouver, for some of  the most popular ski and  snowboard events.

 

With the temperature hovering around 11°C it was  too warm to make snow with snow-blower machines so the winter fun resort was closed to the public yesterday while new snow was flown in from mountains 500 miles further north.

 

It was being laid on a straw foundation to reduce the amount of snow needed to  make a slalom course and a 22ft diameter pipe for snowboard freestyle events.

 

 

As for Sochi, an eyewitness report from someone who was at the Olympics:

 

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post
 
Quote:
That doesn't look like the Sochi I saw in the Olympics.

 

It looks very much as I saw it.  It seems our media was working hard to make things look bad over there, and while we did see some warm sloppy conditions, we hardly saw any unfinished or shoddy construction.  The place was full of fancy, expensive lifts and buildings, and everything was well run.  Whether it was worth the 50 Billion they spent is another story.

 

They say there are two main states of snow there---falling and melting.  Fortunately, a lot falls sometimes.  This winter wonderland scene was snapped from a lift in the middle of the games, but all we saw on TV here was the warm spells.

 

 

 

2) There's always problems. Vancouver was way warmer than expected. Even Whistler was close to too warm.

 

3) Not sure why you care that Russia spent $50 billion to develop Sochi. It's their money. Sure, obviously that money could be better spent and probably won't be recovered, but that's not our problem. I would agree that the IOC should care, but bigger is better because there's more skimming and perks for them. Is that right? No, but it's not just Sochi.

 

I thought we were going into the era of sensible spending on Olympics after the 1976 debacle in Montreal, the downsizing with Lake Placid, and the shoestringing of LA in 1984. When countries step up willing to spend billions though, they tend to get  noticed. I have little doubt money was paid also.


Edited by Tog - 6/11/15 at 9:44am
post #34 of 45

Quote:

Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post
 


Did tourists ever return to Sochi?  Just curious.

Not sure if it's still relevant or not, but I was just on coffee with one friend today, and totally by accident we came to this, that she spent quite some time in Sochi this winter (she's not Russian), and she said Rosa Khutor was actually blooming this year. It was full and they don't remember there would ever be this much tourists... even in summer. Huge majority of them are of course Russians, and they are really happy to have great place to ski (it's suppose to be really cool for freeride) close to home so they don't need to fly all the way to Europe to ski. I was a bit surprised, as on west media is trying to paint completely different image, and she said exactly the same (she's living most of year in Switzerland)... western media is trying to give image of all this as one huge failure, even though in reality it's obviously not. Fact is, for most of west, Russia is still one big enemy, and for USA it's even more so, as it's pretty much only country, next to China, which actually have guts to say and do something against. So try and forget this hate against Russia, but obviously media is doing really good job for people not to do this, and you can even see this here. ;)

post #35 of 45
Thread Starter 

When I bring stuff like this up, it's usually more focused on exposing something that "Just isn't right" or something that needs improvement enough that "arm-chair" judges without HD TV can spot the problems a mile away. Most people want to focus on the negative side of doing this, saying that complaining about it is useless and counter-productive. I totally disagree. As "uncomfortable" as it is, being forced to hear complaints about your job performance, whether you're a mechanic or a figure skating judge, is the ONLY way it ever gets better, even if it takes 50 yrs. Without criticism, the boldness and greed of "Cheaters at the top" only gets worse and worse.

 

My whole point in starting this thread was to debate this issue, and ask the forum if they think the FIFA scandal can be compared or related to the IOC's own issues. I think they can, and are. I also predict the IOC, FIFA, FIS, USSA, USASA, IFSA, and more top-level sanctioning bodies will all be making extra efforts to steer clear of poor decisions that fill their pockets, at least for the next season, & then start to slip again until the next scandal breaks.

 

Even though the effect is subtle, getting rid of corrupt officials, and even jailing them, is one of only 2 ways it ever gets better for the athletes. (Replacing bad officials, & cleaning up the game to get viewership levels back up, after a disillusioned public turns their back on a televised sport due to witnessing cheating or bad calls on the tube.)

post #36 of 45

All global transnational sports organizations are by definition corrupt to the core, have to be, they all answer to different political masters and national pride is at stake in all cases, so it's al la question of degree, and how venal it is. Sometimes, it's low-key,very subtle, other times it's Blatter's Batter!

post #37 of 45
Thread Starter 

I like that term, "Blatter Batter". I think dustyfog  just coined a new phrase that might just become a new descriptor for international sports corruption.

 

Remember, no matter how much people say, "That's just the way it is, and ever will be.", many of us will never accept that, knowing that if we do, it will be perceived by the greedy pigs at the top as an endorsement of their greed. Not only do the athletes and the fans suffer and lose interest in the sport, but this type of greed leads to laziness and boldness on the part of the promoters. Athletes start to see promoters getting paid for products, services, and support that isn't even delivered. The problem always gets worse and worse, until a huge scandal breaks. This never doesn't happen. They never let go of the money they've stolen, until it is taken from them by force. Never.

 

Now the question is: Knowing that it's a part of human nature to try and get a free lunch, and to never ever let go of it, no matter what, what's the greater public's most effective way to keep this problem from ruining the sport? Threat of jail just isn't enough.

 

Keep in mind that all sports are 1st and foremost about the athletes. Without them, there would be nothing. All other facets of a sport are secondary. I've run across several arrogant attitudes by promoters and officials clearly showing that their protecting their paychecks at all costs, and the athletes fair treatment and the integrity of the sport mean absolutely nothing to them. Some would, and have tried to, take the money and run, leaving the event and venue a shambles. I've seen promoters cancel races at the last minute, and try to keep race fees. I've seen promoters lie to the athletes about not being able to justify giving out prize money because of not filling a start list, implying that the prize money comes from race fees when a major sponsor has already put 100% of the prize money up. I've seen athlete housing fall down, or never function properly from day 1, putting unfair stress on certain teams. This list of "graft" violations goes on forever.

 

My opinion of most respondents to the question: Is it business as usual? , is, that it IS business as usual, and most respondents who have claimed that it isn't, have supported their arguments with fallacy. I would guess that most of those respondents are in the industry, and make money off of some of these "tainted" events. I could compare the phenomenon the the dispute between Uber and the Cab industry. Uber riders claim the cab industry is ripping them off with exhorbant fares and poor service, while the cab industry claims Uber is destroying their livelihood. The cabbies are so loyal to their "millionaire" bosses, that they sometimes violently defend the industry's position, not caring if the public gets a fair shake at all.

 

This arrogant attitude about getting paid well, whether you deliver what was promised or not, just gets more and more entrenched as you go up the "food chain".

 

Perhaps, since the tendency seems part of human nature, and an "inevitable" cycle, someone else should start a new thread inviting new ideas on how to keep the "Blatter Batter" to a bare minimum. It would be a fun thread. I can already think of several "fun" things to subject "caught" officials to, as part of their punishment for trying to siphon off excess profits to their own interests from big sport contracts.

 

We could make Blatter camp out in the sun in the World Cup Stadium in Quatar for a month, with no AC of course. We could make Putin stay in one of his abandoned hotels in Socchi for a month in winter. We could also make the IOC camp out in the parking lot at Squaw Valley where the Olympic Ice Arena used to be, before it collapsed, in winter, with no heat of course. We could order the entire New England Patriots team and staff drive their cars around for a year with deflated tires.

 

OK. I'll admit it. That last one was silly. Just having a bit of fun. That's what makes ski forums better than forums for the general public. Ski forums are fun. 

post #38 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeleBruce View Post
 

I like that term, "Blatter Batter". I think dustyfog  just coined a new phrase that might just become a new descriptor for international sports corruption.

 

Remember, no matter how much people say, "That's just the way it is, and ever will be.", many of us will never accept that, knowing that if we do, it will be perceived by the greedy pigs at the top as an endorsement of their greed. Not only do the athletes and the fans suffer and lose interest in the sport, but this type of greed leads to laziness and boldness on the part of the promoters. Athletes start to see promoters getting paid for products, services, and support that isn't even delivered. The problem always gets worse and worse, until a huge scandal breaks. This never doesn't happen. They never let go of the money they've stolen, until it is taken from them by force. Never.

 

Now the question is: Knowing that it's a part of human nature to try and get a free lunch, and to never ever let go of it, no matter what, what's the greater public's most effective way to keep this problem from ruining the sport? Threat of jail just isn't enough.

 

Keep in mind that all sports are 1st and foremost about the athletes. Without them, there would be nothing. All other facets of a sport are secondary. I've run across several arrogant attitudes by promoters and officials clearly showing that their protecting their paychecks at all costs, and the athletes fair treatment and the integrity of the sport mean absolutely nothing to them. Some would, and have tried to, take the money and run, leaving the event and venue a shambles. I've seen promoters cancel races at the last minute, and try to keep race fees. I've seen promoters lie to the athletes about not being able to justify giving out prize money because of not filling a start list, implying that the prize money comes from race fees when a major sponsor has already put 100% of the prize money up. I've seen athlete housing fall down, or never function properly from day 1, putting unfair stress on certain teams. This list of "graft" violations goes on forever.

 

My opinion of most respondents to the question: Is it business as usual? , is, that it IS business as usual, and most respondents who have claimed that it isn't, have supported their arguments with fallacy. I would guess that most of those respondents are in the industry, and make money off of some of these "tainted" events. I could compare the phenomenon the the dispute between Uber and the Cab industry. Uber riders claim the cab industry is ripping them off with exhorbant fares and poor service, while the cab industry claims Uber is destroying their livelihood. The cabbies are so loyal to their "millionaire" bosses, that they sometimes violently defend the industry's position, not caring if the public gets a fair shake at all.

 

This arrogant attitude about getting paid well, whether you deliver what was promised or not, just gets more and more entrenched as you go up the "food chain".

 

Perhaps, since the tendency seems part of human nature, and an "inevitable" cycle, someone else should start a new thread inviting new ideas on how to keep the "Blatter Batter" to a bare minimum. It would be a fun thread. I can already think of several "fun" things to subject "caught" officials to, as part of their punishment for trying to siphon off excess profits to their own interests from big sport contracts.

 

We could make Blatter camp out in the sun in the World Cup Stadium in Quatar for a month, with no AC of course. We could make Putin stay in one of his abandoned hotels in Socchi for a month in winter. We could also make the IOC camp out in the parking lot at Squaw Valley where the Olympic Ice Arena used to be, before it collapsed, in winter, with no heat of course. We could order the entire New England Patriots team and staff drive their cars around for a year with deflated tires.

 

OK. I'll admit it. That last one was silly. Just having a bit of fun. That's what makes ski forums better than forums for the general public. Ski forums are fun. 

 

What insight ! Superb suggestions.

 

While we are at it, one can bring up the absolute autocracy of Havelange, who knows what happened then behind closed doors, the world was a lot less transparent then, and of course Juan Antonio Samaranch and the Olympic Games. The irony is that the 'cleanest' modern Olympics were supposedly the LA 1984 Games organized by Peter Ueberroth himself, while 2002's Salt Lake City Winter Olympics were tarnished by huge vote buying  stories, and good Mitt ran that winter fest.

 

In Cricket, which is the world's richest sport (I know, I know, but it is an economic fact, far more money won, wagered globally on Cricket than any other sport) the entire sport today is tarnished by non-stop match-fixing scandals, stories, some mysterious early demises , jail terms, and the whole cash nexus is run out of the global centre of goodness and god, that paragon of virtue, Dubai! 

 

Just life, luckily great sport still survives, no question...

 

Blatter has not gone batty yet, he did not show for the Women's World Cup as he had a previous engagement with his attorneys who advised him against setting foot on North American soil, the last part is a wild guess, but he did not show, and upto you to decide why. These guys live the life, wonder how the heck they get paid! 

post #39 of 45

The Denver Post posted an article yesterday (7/7/15) that appeared in today's paper, in its ongoing coverage about the Winter Olympics.  This one is about in person recommendations to the IOC regarding safety of slopestyle events, by Dr. Tom Hackett, orthopedic surgeon at Vail's Steadman Clinic and a longtime team doctor to U.S. Olympic boarding and skiing teams.  He was lobbying on behalf of the event, presenting data on injuries and interpreting them, and also taking part in discussion on possible ongoing changes.

 

I might mention a few quotes from the article that caught my attention, and seem perhaps relevant to parts of this discussion: 

 

 

"Hackett said the IOC and FIS recognize the importance of slopestyle events in the Olympics. The IOC last month announced its intention to add a big air snowboard contest to the 2018 Winter Games in South Korea. The gathering in Switzerland included a presentation showing the debut of skiing and snowboarding slopestyle lured more television viewers than any other event in the Sochi Winter Olympics.

'Slopestyle was by far the most popular thing that people watched globally,' Hackett said."

Also: 

 

"The group focused on how to create more consistency in slopestyle courses, meaning a sort of design standard for takeoff and landing ramps as well as rail sections.

"There are a lot of opinions about course design but very little factual consensus. Hackett pushed the idea that course designers should not be political appointees but, like the Olympic athletes, the 'very best of the best.'

"Beyond course design, there was in-depth discussion on standards for snowmaking, which is even more varied than jump building. Even with the best jump, the speed and trajectory of athletes is often determined by the consistency of the snow. Again Hackett urged the IOC to ask Olympic and World Cup hosts to select internationally recognized snowmakers to help build venues, not just tap a political favorite.

" 'I was on a mission to shift course design and snowmaking away from politics and nationalism and toward the very best in the world,' Hackett said. 'I sounded like a broken record.' " 

 

 

I'm too computer ignorant to get a direct link to work, but the article can be found at: 

 

http://www.denverpost.com/outdoors/ci_28449541/ioc-wants-make-slopestyle-safer-while-keeping-spirit

post #40 of 45
Thread Starter 

Well, dusty fog, the real reason Blatter was a no-show at the Women's World Cup is that FIFA failed to adopt the "Shorter shorts" for Women's soccer. I had my speech all planned out too. As far as the others go, we'll have to make it a group campout. I'm selling bundles of firewood for 5 million, and Smore Kits for 5 mil.

post #41 of 45
Thread Starter 


Take the "Blue Pill".

post #42 of 45
Thread Starter 


Thanks for that, ski otter. Real facts are always nice to steer discussions back to reality. I totally agree with Hackett. Of course, another way to make good snow is to do it somewhere where it's consistently cold in winter. Even almighty Vail doesn't make much snow when it's raining.

 

Also, the balance between a standardized set of rules for park builds, although a good idea, leads the sport toward boredom and over-regulation, inviting more influence peddling and corruption. Finding the balance between consistency and free expression is the crux. Regulation has an overwhelming tendency to take the "free" out of freeski. Not that some regulation isn't needed. The athletes themselves, in both freeskiing and snowboarding have aggressively resisted this type of regulation since their sports split off from mainstream skiing, and quite understandably. We already have freestyle, with standardized jumps and "certified" aka "super expensive to learn" tricks. We also have standardized ski specs for World Cup racing, something the all the athletes under 200 lbs. and not sponsored by Fischer are just thrilled about. We discussed this topic in detail in my post on "Olympic level halfpipe coaching".

 

Consistency in halfpipe design has proven to be a good thing with the evolution of the "Olympic Superpipe." Of course, we might not have the "Red Bull", double superpipe if everyone thought that way. Figuring out why people want consistency vs. freedom might make an interesting psych study. Personally, I like consistency in halfpipe design because I have a son who goes 12' out of that pipe all winter long, and he does get hurt sometimes. Good old self preservation is my motive there. That study would probably take as many Shrinks as the one finding the reasons behind the inevitable human tendency toward corruption when given too much control or power. Probably self-preservation run amok again. Ask your parole officer. They have some pysch training.

post #43 of 45

The inference is that the snowmakers were subpar? A lot of the snowmakers were from the US. The overall snow consultant was Finnish.

Quote:
In preparation for the Games, the organizers hired Mikko Martikainen, a Finnish consultant, to plan for adequate snow. Among other things, he recommended stockpiling snow last season; about 650,000 cubic yards of it were stored in huge piles under insulated blankets on north-facing slopes in the area, ready to be trucked to the Olympic courses this winter if needed. But in an email, Mr. Martikainen said that because of the success accumulating natural and machine-made snow this year, most of the stockpiled snow would not be used.

 

SMI snowmakers from Midland, MI were involved in setting the system up.

http://www.snowmakers.com/rosa-khutor.html#

 

I remember reading about snowmaking at Sochi and a crew from the US who went over there. They were top guys. Not sure what that article is talking about. The big problem was the humidity and weather. The guy was talking about how they pushed making snow at a wet bulb temp they rarely go to.

Lest we forget, Cypress Mt for Vancouver Olympics was pretty bad due to weather.

 

 

found it, it's from the same article.


 

Quote:

Snowmakers pay special attention to wet bulb temperatures, which take humidity into account along with the actual air temperature. At Rosa Khutor, which is only 25 miles from Sochi, the host city on the Black Sea where conditions are subtropical, wet bulb readings can often be too high to make snow. Or, if snow can be made, it may be little more than water droplets with a bit of ice around them.

 

“I’ve been making snow for 17 years, and I’ve very rarely made snow at 28 degrees wet bulb,” Mr. Wax said. Such a reading — which, if the humidity is 50 percent, means the air temperature is 34 degrees — is considered poor for snowmaking. But except for those two weeklong intervals, when wet bulb readings dropped to around 21 or 22 degrees, he said, he made snow in marginal conditions.

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/04/science/an-olympian-snow-endeavor-in-sochi.html?_r=0

 

The big issue I think is they didn't hire Snow Park Technologies to build the half pipe and jumps, and they - athletes, hate FIS who doesn't listen to them. Sounds like Formula 1 back in the day when they could care less about driver safety.

post #44 of 45
Thread Starter 

Responding to the latest reply on my Post about corruption at the IOC & FIFA, I really liked ?? reply, reporting that things in Socchi are much better than "Western" reports and opinions suggest. Hearing that tourism, and economic activity are up in Socchi since the Olympics left there, is good news. This is one of the main reasons cities and tourist areas scrap to get the Olympics in their towns. Nothing is more depressing than seeing a town go into debt to secure and build an Olympic venue, only to see all the profits leave town right after the games with some "Development Mogul." Having the economic boost a town or tourist zone gets from hosting an Olympics, is part of the goal the general public wants from the IOC. Choosing venues and promoters that can prove their developments will bring long-term economic health, and building for transition to "Post-Olympic" purposes, is a growing movement around the world. Pushing that ideal is part of why I started this post. 

 

Seeing the "politics" of the whole thing, and how old enemies try to twist the truth to make each other look bad, is something that's been going on since the Olympics began. It's part of the "Business as usual" that I wanted to expose by starting this post, while also proving that accepting the way the politicians and profiteers go for maximum personal gain with these contracts is un-sustainable for the rest of humanity, and that collective humanity needs to pressure the "big-wigs" to use the Olympics to build for the long term, actually creating and supporting a sustainable economy. It's always going to be a fight to get closer to that ideal, as I feel that trying to collect all the marbles for yourself is a "hard-wired" human trait, and the tendency toward greed and graft will never end. The need to accept that fact, and actively work toward a more sustainable situation for us all, is everyone's responsibility, and the response to graft & greed that isn't hard-wired. It has to come from the "conscious" side of our brains. That makes it more difficult, but still possible. It's kind of like swimming up-stream, or rock-climbing. As soon as you relax or fail, gravity takes you back down the same exact way it always does, and you have to start over. Welcome to Earth. The need to "re-do" and keep up the pressure is and always will be. The need to resist giving up and accepting the fallacy that, "It's inevitable" is also an unshakable part of human nature.

 

PS. - Stop picking on the Russians. The Russian People are more like Americans than any Patriots would like to admit. Although Putin appears to be dictator, he rightly points out that the American Gov/Military machine is no less guilty of "imperialism" than any other world power.

 

It's our governments and the way they do business that need a lesson in manners, not out peoples at large.

 

"Hugs instead of Thugs."?

post #45 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post
 

Quote:

Not sure if it's still relevant or not, but I was just on coffee with one friend today, and totally by accident we came to this, that she spent quite some time in Sochi this winter (she's not Russian), and she said Rosa Khutor was actually blooming this year. It was full and they don't remember there would ever be this much tourists... even in summer. Huge majority of them are of course Russians, and they are really happy to have great place to ski (it's suppose to be really cool for freeride) close to home so they don't need to fly all the way to Europe to ski. I was a bit surprised, as on west media is trying to paint completely different image, and she said exactly the same (she's living most of year in Switzerland)... western media is trying to give image of all this as one huge failure, even though in reality it's obviously not. Fact is, for most of west, Russia is still one big enemy, and for USA it's even more so, as it's pretty much only country, next to China, which actually have guts to say and do something against. So try and forget this hate against Russia, but obviously media is doing really good job for people not to do this, and you can even see this here. ;)

 

I happen to be from Russia, and confirm that 14/15 winter season was a blast for Sochi mountain resorts. Furthermore, tourists are increasingly spending time there now that it is summer, and the 15/16 season presale is going well with 60-70% of rooms booked for the Xmas period.

 

On the other hand, it did not come cheap. Apart from ski holls, most of the sports infrastructure is underutilized, some clear damage was done to the enviroment, and this June's floods came with the realization that the city's drainage system is was screwed up and required to be re-done.

 

As for the main topic of the thread: I may sound un-patriotic, but I would love to see the 2018 World Cup moved to another country (I believe that UK is ready to host the event with a little of ramping up). Too many cons outweighing the pros.

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Racing and Big Mountain Competitions › Is the FIFA scandal an example of "Business as Usual" at the IOC and other Skiing Related International Sanctioning Bodies?