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Tool Time, more power to ya - Page 2

post #31 of 49
Our MI house has several Makita drills with the long (12V?) batteries, but no other cordless tools. Lots of those expensive batteries lying around.. In CO, I started buying Ridgid because of the lifetime battery program and have ended up buying their corded stuff too. I've drilled a lot and driven numerous boxes of screws with the Ridgid cordless. I use a Ridgid cordless impact to change seasonal wheels on the cars.
post #32 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

Our MI house has several Makita drills with the long (12V?) batteries, but no other cordless tools. Lots of those expensive batteries lying around.. In CO, I started buying Ridgid because of the lifetime battery program and have ended up buying their corded stuff too. I've drilled a lot and driven numerous boxes of screws with the Ridgid cordless. I use a Ridgid cordless impact to change seasonal wheels on the cars.


I've been a fan of Ridgid but haven't had any of the cordless tools. 

post #33 of 49

I've been using 18v Ryobi cordless tools for 20 years. For household use, they're pretty damn good. They certainly do not suck. (Well, the Tough Sucker hand vac sucks, but it's supposed to.)

Anyway, I restored an off-the-grid cabin and rebuilt its 10x20 deck using only a Ryobi circular saw and drill-driver, charging the batteries and a couple of spares at home each night. I rarely ran out of juice. Then I did major renos on our house with a wider portfolio of Ryobi gear. In all this time, not one tool has failed, and only one battery (one of the old original NiCads) has gone dead. For the money, they're hard to beat.

I own three drill-drivers, two 7" circular saws, a reciprocating saw, a hand vac and a cordless nailer. They've all been used a lot, worked well and show no signs of breaking down or wearing out.

post #34 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post
 

 

Just google any of the following pozidrive bit, pz2 or pz3 bits. 

 

Example:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Wera-Sheet-Metal-Pozidriv-blade/dp/B0015505QS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1434194827&sr=8-1&keywords=wera+pz3+bit


Thanks  KG for the link I have seen the amazon link before and the 70MM is about 2.75 inch and that is too short, my best length is 4 inches because it clears the height of most of the toe and heels.  The 6 inch is OK but they bend too easy and depending on the height of the bench you are working on it may be tough to provide enough downward pressure.  I will keep looking.  Thanks

 

PS.  In a pinch I have taken an old number 2 Phillips and grind down the point to make it less pointy, this allows the tip to sit deeper into the PZ screw head.  It may slip a little but not bad, I have not striped the screw head but you need to use a lot of downward pressure.  I only would try it with an old number 2 Phillips bit.


Edited by Uncle-A - 6/13/15 at 9:07am
post #35 of 49

Slidewright has a 3.75" #2.

http://www.slidewright.com/proddetail.php?prod=K529W2

but only the 2" and 6" in #3.  (Middle lengths out of stock.)  You could email him and ask why they are so hard to find.

(I have a 6" I bought from him several years ago.)

post #36 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
 

Slidewright has a 3.75" #2.

http://www.slidewright.com/proddetail.php?prod=K529W2

but only the 2" and 6" in #3.  (Middle lengths out of stock.)  You could email him and ask why they are so hard to find.

(I have a 6" I bought from him several years ago.)


Thanks, mdf I have only been to Slide Wright once before and I hope to find the middle length when they restock.  Thanks 

post #37 of 49
6 inch Pozi #3 bits...
They don't like to sell just 1.
DeWalt- $2 but 50 minimum
http://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/33299314

Wera- all over the map, here's 10 for $50
http://www.carbideprocessors.com/pozidriv-bit-3x152mm-10-pk-wera-05060047001/?page_context=category&faceted_search=0

As usual, McMaster Carr comes through. $4.52 each

http://www.mcmaster.com/#52865a24/=xlvyxj
post #38 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

6 inch Pozi #3 bits...
They don't like to sell just 1.
DeWalt- $2 but 50 minimum
http://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/33299314

Wera- all over the map, here's 10 for $50
http://www.carbideprocessors.com/pozidriv-bit-3x152mm-10-pk-wera-05060047001/?page_context=category&faceted_search=0

As usual, McMaster Carr comes through. $4.52 each

http://www.mcmaster.com/#52865a24/=xlvyxj

Thanks, Tog I think I will order 2 from McMaster. 

post #39 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle-A View Post


Thanks  KG for the link I have seen the amazon link before and the 70MM is about 2.75 inch and that is too short, my best length is 4 inches because it clears the height of most of the toe and heels.  The 6 inch is OK but they bend too easy and depending on the height of the bench you are working on it may be tough to provide enough downward pressure.  I will keep looking.  Thanks

 

PS.  In a pinch I have taken an old number 2 Phillips and grind down the point to make it less pointy, this allows the tip to sit deeper into the PZ screw head.  It may slip a little but not bad, I have not striped the screw head but you need to use a lot of downward pressure.  I only would try it with an old number 2 Phillips bit.

 

Bending a 6" drive bit while mounting a set of binding?

What kind of screws are you mounting your bindings with?  You must be mounting the new X-90 race bindings with 5/8" x 4" Tapcon on the new Atomic DH skis with the 7,000 psi concrete core. :rolleyes

 

BTW, nice skis - great high speed stability, tons of road hugging weight. :D

post #40 of 49
The Pozidriv versus Phillips is a subtle difference. It's hard to see even looking at the drivers. The wings of Pozi are not tapered and it's shallower. Also, the wings go in flatter to the center.

PH = Phillips Head
PZ = Pozidriv

PH%20Schraubenzieher%20in%20Schraube.jpg

PZ%20Schraubenzieher%20in%20Schraube.jpg

800px-PHILLIPS_and_POZIDRIV_screwdrivers.JPG
Wikimedia
Phillips on left, Pozidriv on right.

To confuse matters, there's JIS, a Japanese standard, which is like Phillips with flatter wings. It's common on Japanese equipment.

screws_JIS_phillips_screwdriver_angle.jpg

jis_phil.jpg

Now there's also Phillips II Plus which can be driven with a square bit also and have anti camout ribs, ACR, on bit and screw.
home_image.jpg

I think it's the similar as Supadriv but Supadrive does not have ribs?


Then there's Reed and Prince/Frearson. Which is often on Marine stuff like bronze screws. Also older electrical equipment. Supposedly during WWII nearly half of all American aircraft used them as well as Chris Craft boats and Higgins boats.
http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?4353-reed-and-prince-screws

Phillips on left, Frearson on right.
F0E8C7GFOVXPGYF.LARGE.jpg


This article is pretty comprehensive.
http://m.instructables.com/id/When-a-Phillips-is-not-a-Phillips/?ALLSTEPS
post #41 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coach13 View Post


True, most of the batteries are pretty lighweight compared to a few years back. The one advantage of the 18v Dewalt is it's universal to all their other types cordless power tools.

It was.

 

They fairly recently went to a new style 18V battery that is similar to the 24V system that had over a decade ago.

post #42 of 49

looks to be a deal of day on Amazon, if Dewalt is one's preference:

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00NHBZ9AA?ref_=gbsl_tit_l-1_8122_17ef22b3&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER

post #43 of 49


or a hard to beat Dewalt deal - may not be contractor grade but I am pretty impressed with construction and performance

 

http://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-DCD771C2-Lithium-Ion-Compact-Driver/dp/B00ET5VMTU/ref=sr_1_2?s=power-hand-tools&ie=UTF8&qid=1434421651&sr=1-2&refinements=p_89%3ADEWALT

post #44 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post

Bending a 6" drive bit while mounting a set of binding?
What kind of screws are you mounting your bindings with?  You must be mounting the new X-90 race bindings with 5/8" x 4" Tapcon on the new Atomic DH skis with the 7,000 psi concrete core. rolleyes.gif

BTW, nice skis - great high speed stability, tons of road hugging weight. biggrin.gif
I have a habit of resting my drill/driver on the tails of the skies I am mounting and have been known to have it hit the floor on occasion. The 6 inch always land point first and that's all she wrote for that bit. The 4 inch lands different and do not seem to bend as much.
post #45 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by pete View Post
 

looks to be a deal of day on Amazon, if Dewalt is one's preference:

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00NHBZ9AA?ref_=gbsl_tit_l-1_8122_17ef22b3&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER

My grandfather (who built his own furniture and hated paying a carpenter/plumber/electrician for anything) always used Milwaukee. I've used Dewalt and Makita over the last 20 years without any issues for light carpentry/handyman type use. I personally like Makita better than Dewalt (better ergonomics imho), but that is a great deal on the Dewalt. I may take advantage of that deal myself.

post #46 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle-A View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post

Bending a 6" drive bit while mounting a set of binding?
What kind of screws are you mounting your bindings with?  You must be mounting the new X-90 race bindings with 5/8" x 4" Tapcon on the new Atomic DH skis with the 7,000 psi concrete core. rolleyes.gif

BTW, nice skis - great high speed stability, tons of road hugging weight. biggrin.gif
I have a habit of resting my drill/driver on the tails of the skies I am mounting and have been known to have it hit the floor on occasion. The 6 inch always land point first and that's all she wrote for that bit. The 4 inch lands different and do not seem to bend as much.



Wiha make a 9cm PZ3 bit, pg. 27:   http://www.wihatools.com/pdf/WihaBitsCatalog.pdf

post #47 of 49

I would advise caution with Dewalt - at least in Canada.

 

It turns out Dewalt still sells both NiCad as well as Li-Ion tools in this country. For the home user, NiCads should be avoided. They do not hold a charge well, even when new, and they have a memory, which means if you let it sit for a month so that it discharges and stays that way for a while, it will be difficult to get it to take a full charge again. If, on the other hand, you constantly top off the charge, the battery will not fully discharge because of the memory. You can overcome this by fully cycling the battery regularly, but it's a PITA. This is not a problem with Li-Ion batteries.

 

NiCads may actually be OK if you use the tool often, since you will avoid the memory problem by constantly cycling the battery.

 

Other than the NiCad vs. Li-Ion issue, Dewalt is fine. As are Bosch, Makita and Milwaukee.

 

Impact drivers are awesome, especially for driving screws into concrete. Of course, if you want to drive screws into concrete, you also need a hammer drill to make the holes in the first place. Brushless drivers provide more torque and more battery life, but are significantly more expensive. They may not be worth it for your application. Or they might be an absolute requirement.

 

When shopping, you should also remember that an impact wrench is not the same as an impact driver. One removes your summer wheels/tires, the other drives screws.

 

As noted in previous posts, some Craftsman tools are made by very reputable manufacturers and are excellent. Others are junk. The problem is that you have no way of knowing what you're getting.

 

Ridgid, even though it's Home Depot's house brand, is usually pretty good. Ridgid also makes a suite of professional plumbing tools which are not available from Home Depot. They are sold through trade suppliers.


Edited by jhcooley - 7/8/15 at 4:05pm
post #48 of 49

@Philpug

 

In case one's looking at a set .. Milwaukee makes a fine line, todays special only at HD:

 

http://www.homedepot.com/SpecialBuy/SpecialBuyOfTheDay

post #49 of 49

Posted with thinking.


Edited by oldschoolskier - 11/22/15 at 10:18am
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