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Definition of Absorption and Extension - Page 2

post #31 of 34

Well said, ski pilot.

post #32 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by cgeib View Post

I think drop the use of the term Absorption!

Please do not drop the term absorption.

Absorption  is the opposite of flexion: Flexion keeps the bodyweight on the skis in order for the feet to apply pressure on the snow for the extension.

Meanwhile the absorption is to remove the bodyweight from the skis to avoid being thrown out of balance by a bump, hole or any other rough terrain.

As you can't apply pressure on your skis when skiing deep and light powder (or you'll sink deep into the stuff...), absorption is the only way to get the skis out of the snow and be able to initiate the turn.

Op Traken was a form of absorption when pulling the legs up before reaching the top or the nose of a bump. It would reduce your "airborne time".

The late and mentor Georges Joubert's racing technique introduced the "Avalement", another kind of absorption but with a larger amplitude of knee "flexion" which requires the skier to lean slightly backward in order to avoid the knees against the chest.

A good ski pole technique is essential for the balance as the center of gravity is rarely above the feet but further back on the skis.

Knees are the engine of the turn while in the traditional parallel turn the transfer of weight and the upper body rotation are the dominant forces.

Racers of the GUC (Grenoble University Club) coached by Georges Joubert were recognized easily by using this technique.

A very similar technique is still used in moguls skiing.

French ski team members Patrick Russell and Jean-Noel Augert were the pioneers for this very dynamic technique in the late sixties and early seventies.

Following their success in slalom, they were rapidly emulated by the world best racers.

This is when appeared the ski boots with additional back support behind the calf.

post #33 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrick1944 View Post
 

Please do not drop the term absorption.

Absorption  is the opposite of flexion: Flexion keeps the bodyweight on the skis in order for the feet to apply pressure on the snow for the extension.

Meanwhile the absorption is to remove the bodyweight from the skis to avoid being thrown out of balance by a bump, hole or any other rough terrain.

As you can't apply pressure on your skis when skiing deep and light powder (or you'll sink deep into the stuff...), absorption is the only way to get the skis out of the snow and be able to initiate the turn.

Op Traken was a form of absorption when pulling the legs up before reaching the top or the nose of a bump. It would reduce your "airborne time".

The late and mentor Georges Joubert's racing technique introduced the "Avalement", another kind of absorption but with a larger amplitude of knee "flexion" which requires the skier to lean slightly backward in order to avoid the knees against the chest.

A good ski pole technique is essential for the balance as the center of gravity is rarely above the feet but further back on the skis.

Knees are the engine of the turn while in the traditional parallel turn the transfer of weight and the upper body rotation are the dominant forces.

Racers of the GUC (Grenoble University Club) coached by Georges Joubert were recognized easily by using this technique.

A very similar technique is still used in moguls skiing.

French ski team members Patrick Russell and Jean-Noel Augert were the pioneers for this very dynamic technique in the late sixties and early seventies.

Following their success in slalom, they were rapidly emulated by the world best racers.

This is when appeared the ski boots with additional back support behind the calf.

Sorry Patrick, but the term "absorption" has officially been dropped by the IFST (International Federation of Ski Terminology) for that type of usage.

 

Flexion and extension are the equal but opposite movements.

Absorption and pressure the equal but opposite outcomes of these movements.

 

If you would like to apply to have the term "absorption" used as a "movement", you just need to fill out a form 582-3cy in triplicate, gain the signatures of 300 level 3 PSIA instructors that agree with you and pay state and federal fees totaling $2300. I know a guy so that you can give me just $1000 cash to get the fee taken care of at a discount. For another $1000, I can get those signatures for you also. Just pm me.

post #34 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich666 View Post

Sorry Patrick, but the term "absorption" has officially been dropped by the IFST (International Federation of Ski Terminology) for that type of usage.

Flexion and extension are the equal but opposite movements.
Absorption and pressure the equal but opposite outcomes of these movements.

If you would like to apply to have the term "absorption" used as a "movement", you just need to fill out a form 582-3cy in triplicate, gain the signatures of 300 level 3 PSIA instructors that agree with you and pay state and federal fees totaling $2300. I know a guy so that you can give me just $1000 cash to get the fee taken care of at a discount. For another $1000, I can get those signatures for you also. Just pm me.

IFST stands for International Federation of Snowball Throwing

https://snowballthrowing.wordpress.com/tag/about-ifst/
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