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Super slow motion short turns - Korean style

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Fun to watch and a reminder that there are many ways to skin a cat.

 

post #2 of 7
Thread Starter 
Psy.
post #3 of 7

This looks like a demo competition style. The short radius is a category in the demo competition.

 

These types of competitions are really popular in Japan. Really amazing to ski with the guys that ski this way. 

post #4 of 7
Purely aesthetic, but I much prefer this:


Just looks more fun. I've always wondered why the Japanese and Korean mastery of tech turns never translated to more success in racing. Probably because there's not the financial support for racing. Winning a big tech championship will keep you in gear and lift tickets for life.
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

Purely aesthetic, but I much prefer this:


Just looks more fun. I've always wondered why the Japanese and Korean mastery of tech turns never translated to more success in racing. Probably because there's not the financial support for racing. Winning a big tech championship will keep you in gear and lift tickets for life.

 

I posted the OP video in another thread last year and had some general commentary about it. Basically, I've skiied with the guy in the video and even took a few lessons from him. As another poster said, it is 100% a technical demonstration ski technique, which they like to call "interski" around here. The name interski is derived from the "Interski" festival that you are all probably familiar with, but in Korea, many people forget that and just assume interski means = skiing comfortably with pretty form, with an emphasis on form. What you may notice in the video is a pronounced and abrupt "heel strike" motion at the start of each turn - you are encouraged to make this motion both to scrub speed and help with change in direction. The progression is 1) creating tail slide, followed by 2) bending/wrapping/winding the ski around to complete the turn.

 

Why does Korea fail in racing? A couple reasons:

 

1) No money. Korea can't even get their act together to get work done for Pyeongchang Olympics, funding for winter sports outside of figure skating and speed skating is minimal.

2) Nowhere to train. All of the skiable areas in Korea are privately owned by private conglomorates. These for-profit resorts would rather have paying guests use their limited slope offerings, rather than closing off entire areas or creating new pistes for professionals to practice on. The few times they do close off areas for practice, it is on a short groomed area only, and only for a limited amount of time.

3) Limited foreign training. Due to 1 and 2 above, Korean alpine ski team members usually are forced to ski in China, and from occasion Japan and maybe Italy if they are lucky.

4) Limited experience of variety of terrain. Few Korean alpine skiiers have ever set foot on a WC downhill course. They spend most of their time skiing on a limited number of familiar, groomed hard-pack terrain (not ice). Thus, they have a hard time adjusting to WC or Olympic courses. You can tell by the number of Korean skiiers who quickly gain too much speed and ski out of control and DQ in the preliminary stages at international competition.

5) The KSIA. They dominate the ski culture in Korea. All skiiers pretty much go through the KSIA system before becoming a racer. The KSIA system is a hybrid based off of foreign organisations like the PSIA or JSIA, but with an incredible emphasis on "interski" and demonstration-style technical skiing. National champions have absolutely terrible ski form, but are encouraged to ski "with style" to promote the sport and simply because they think it looks good.

6) Limited participants. Few if any HS and univesrities have actual dedicated ski "teams." They have ski "circles" or "clubs" which are social gatherings and they don't take skiing seriously, although they do call themselves ski "teams". Many pro skiiers are converted athletes from other sports at a farily late age (some as late as college when they enter the various Physical Education Universities) since they need to pick a sport to compete in order to go to college.

 

This is not to say that the alpine skiiers in Korea are lacking in dedication or effort. It's just that the system in Korea is way too biased against ski racing as a professional sport. The KSIA, with all their power and financing, could careless about alpine racing, since their focus is on brand sponsorship through technical competitions.

 

Will this ever change? I doubt it. Ski racing is perceived as a highly dangerous sport in Korea. People and ski patrols give you dirty looks if you show up with GS skis. I've never seen anyone in Korea (in over 200 days of skiing here over the past 5 years) with SG or DH skills. Not only are parents against it, but also members of the KSIA, and ski resorts themselves (liability issues). The limited interest and support from all levels of Korean society is really a sad situation.

post #6 of 7

Blue run heroics. Get on a black and all that form dissolves as the function of staying upright and in control on an uneven and steeper surface. Typical in Chinese and Korean culture to be 'seen' to be good. 

2nd video shared by Marko is much better, and similar to the way I like to ski, but even with good cardio it can get exhausting pretty quickly.


Edited by Lewn777 - 12/15/15 at 4:45am
post #7 of 7

I was bored on the NH groomers this weekend (not much snow) and figured doing something like that would be good exercise and my kids would see me constantly turning. It's pretty fun, almost like a weird groovy dance.

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