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Rossignol Radical RS World Cup 2008

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Hi all,

 

I might be able to get a good deal on Rossignol Radical RS World Cup 2008 skis that are basically brand new, the person has only used them a couple of times.  

 

Currently I have fischer RC4 worldcup sl skis (non FIS) and the rossis ar definitely heavier and stiffer. Was wondering if it's worth upgrading (would that even be an upgrade?) to further progress my skiing in the aggressive carving aspect.

 

I haven't really had any experience with FIS approved skis before and will probably be able to test them before I buy them next winter. Was just wondering if that is a smart step to take. They are the same length and have the same radius as my current skis. (165cm and 13m radius).

 

Thank you :)

post #2 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by MozarTos View Post
 

Hi all,

 

I might be able to get a good deal on Rossignol Radical RS World Cup 2008 skis that are basically brand new, the person has only used them a couple of times.  

 

Currently I have fischer RC4 worldcup sl skis (non FIS) and the rossis ar definitely heavier and stiffer. Was wondering if it's worth upgrading (would that even be an upgrade?) to further progress my skiing in the aggressive carving aspect.

 

I haven't really had any experience with FIS approved skis before and will probably be able to test them before I buy them next winter. Was just wondering if that is a smart step to take. They are the same length and have the same radius as my current skis. (165cm and 13m radius).

 

Thank you :)


By fischer RC4 worldcup sl skis (non FIS) do you mean the SCs (I also own a pair)? 

How much do you weigh?

 

I haven't tried the Rossi FIS, but have tried the non-FIS,  Rossi NON-FIS from that period was a blast, very quick side to side and very light, although not at all ammenable to being forced to work at speeds higher than it was designed for.  Based on extrapolation, assuming the same trend observed in Fischer (RX8 - RC4 WC SC - RC4 SL), would be a little quicker edge to edge and also more demanding.  It would be good step up in the fun department if you have the skills, but would not help you improve unless you weigh about 200 lbs.  If you want to improve and you weigh about 165 lbs, you need something softer than the non-FIS Fischer, even though you would give up a little bit at the top end.  To improve, you want something you can tip to a large angle and bend a lot without needing to force yourself too much.

post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 


By fischer RC4 worldcup sl skis (non FIS) do you mean the SCs (I also own a pair)? 

How much do you weigh?

 

I haven't tried the Rossi FIS, but have tried the non-FIS,  Rossi NON-FIS from that period was a blast, very quick side to side and very light, although not at all ammenable to being forced to work at speeds higher than it was designed for.  Based on extrapolation, assuming the same trend observed in Fischer (RX8 - RC4 WC SC - RC4 SL), would be a little quicker edge to edge and also more demanding.  It would be good step up in the fun department if you have the skills, but would not help you improve unless you weigh about 200 lbs.  If you want to improve and you weigh about 165 lbs, you need something softer than the non-FIS Fischer, even though you would give up a little bit at the top end.  To improve, you want something you can tip to a large angle and bend a lot without needing to force yourself too much.

Thank you for replying, Ghost!

 

The fischers that I have are the SC. There are quite many of them so it was hard to find on google, but I think mine are from 2013. They have air carbon titanium 0.8 written on them whatever that means... They look like these ones:

http://www.jollysportsrl.com/wp-content/themes/shopperpress/thumbs/fischer-2014-rc4-world-cup-sc-pro-race-track-skis-230x1200.jpg

 

I took my first steps into aggressive carving with my dads Nordica dobermann skis (pretty soft flexing) and liked them. Then I got these and I found out I couldn't really do tight turns and bend them properly at first, but after improving my technique I find them really easy and trying my dads skis now, I hated them. Soft and floppy.

 

I enjoy going really low in the carves (ass almost touching the snow) and feeling the G forces build up in the body. I've set the edge angles on them to 87 and 0.5 and I find I enjoy it this way a lot more than it was before (not sure what it was, probably 89).

 

I weigh 66kgs (160lbs), but I have strong legs (could squat ~250lbs when I last tried). 

 

I think I might enjoy the challenge of those skis if they're not completely out of my weight league (if there is such thing).

 

Thank you!

post #4 of 14

Given that information, I think you would really enjoy the Rossi FIS SLs.  Buy them for having fun at full blast. 

 

I still think something softer in flex would be better for improving technique.   Something that still is narrow with full camber.  Maybe Head WC Rebels i. SL (11.5 m radius at 165 cm).  Get them while you can; unless you live in a very snowy place and don't need sharp edges, your edges will be filed off before you wear out your SCs.

post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 

I wasn't even planning on getting a new pair of skis as I love the ones I currently have (the fischers).

 

The deal just came up as a friend of mine (a woman) had bought these some time ago and tried them like 3 times before deciding they're too hard/stiff for her and is willing to get rid of them :)

 

So I might just sell the Fischers and get the Rossis. Thank you.

post #6 of 14

Don't sell the Fischers until you try the Rossi FIS SL; the Fischers may prove better when you are not skiing at 9 or 10 tenths.  In addition to (the Fischers) being very forgiving (albeit a bit less so when tuned to 0.5, 3 (like mine too) ), while not ideal for slow speed drills, they aren't a bear either.

 

EDIT: On second thought, if the Rossi FIS is too high strung, and you've sold the Fischer SCs, you will have a good excuse to buy the Head :D i. SL to go along with the FIS ski.


Edited by Ghost - 5/25/15 at 9:04am
post #7 of 14
Hi


Here are some thoughts I had reading the thread:

- I wonder why is the your woman friend trying a 165 FIS SL ski from 2008? That's the men's length, and most women would be in a 155/157

- A 2008 ski that was used just a few times? Have you seen it? Are the edges very used up?

- FIS SL skis tend to be on the heavy side (especially with bindings going DIN14+) . What about when the snow is bad (slush, bumps), will it still be manageable? Or you can use it strictly on hard snow, no need for gliding a lot?

- Recent skis change so fast, I don't know if I would pick a 2008 ski, even if it's in very good condition. I'm very surprised, for example, how the Rossignol Hero ST TI performs, considering its kinda light

- You are getting a SL ski, not far away from your current one. Have you thought about a GS one instead? Do you have enough mountain to let them fly?

Not trying to discourage, but trying to explore the possibilities
post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceCookie View Post

Hi


Here are some thoughts I had reading the thread:

- I wonder why is the your woman friend trying a 165 FIS SL ski from 2008? That's the men's length, and most women would be in a 155/157

- A 2008 ski that was used just a few times? Have you seen it? Are the edges very used up?

- FIS SL skis tend to be on the heavy side (especially with bindings going DIN14+) . What about when the snow is bad (slush, bumps), will it still be manageable? Or you can use it strictly on hard snow, no need for gliding a lot?

- Recent skis change so fast, I don't know if I would pick a 2008 ski, even if it's in very good condition. I'm very surprised, for example, how the Rossignol Hero ST TI performs, considering its kinda light

- You are getting a SL ski, not far away from your current one. Have you thought about a GS one instead? Do you have enough mountain to let them fly?

Not trying to discourage, but trying to explore the possibilities

-That woman was becoming a really good skier at that time and wanted something more challenging and her friends (apparently ski instructors...) gave her this ski. She got them in 2008 or 2009 and only tried them a couple of times and even then found them too challanging. She had a back-up pair to fall back on. Following year she went to study abroad and left the skis back home, so they haven't been used for last couple of years.

-I've seen the skis, they are brand new. No clue why would anyone sell her 165 13m skis...

-The skis are very heavy and stiff. The binding goes from 8 - 14 if I remember correctly. I find my Fischer skis easy to power through bumps and slush with no problem. 

 

The last 2 points are the ones that I'm a little worried myself.

 

-I'm wondering what meaningful changes have happened during this time?

 

-They're both 165cm 13m radius skis with titanium core. The real skiing I do is when I go to Italy/Austria/France (Alps), locally I just mess around with my friends with freestyle skis as we don't have proper mountains. 

-GS ski could be fun, I've only tried them a couple of times. By GS I mean 'cheater' skis with ~18m radius or so, not proper FIS GS skis, those would probably be too much to handle and require ridiculous speeds to get them to work. Are the FIS GS skis even stiffer than the FIS SL ones? I honestly can't imagine ski being more stiff than the Rossis I checked out. 

post #9 of 14

Re the last two points:  I'm sure the 2015 Rossi FIS SL is better at SL racing than the 2008 Rossi FIS SL (on the right feet), but the 2008 is still a good SL ski.

I would bet the difference you would see between it and your SCs are the Rossi would be a lot quicker edge to edge.  You would enjoy it making lightning quick turns, say playing mogul tetris (TM:D).

I bet you would find it a little less forgiving as well.

 

I'm also pretty sure you don't want the Rossi Herio ST.  They will finish a turn just fine, but won't hook up at the start of a turn like Fischer SCs.

post #10 of 14
Hi

I've mentioned the DIN14 because it seems you would be able to fit in a DIN12 binding comfortably (which is light, but most FIS skis will come with higher ones)

Although the racing skis don't change a lot, I would say recently they've got a bit of tip rocker, higher radius and softer tip flex, which helps with the initiation. I think it makes them a little bit friendlier to ski (still, it's a race ski, so you have to work it)

Me personally I'm not much of a versatility ski person (I'm normally in GS skis) but I think the FIS SL are a bit too specialised tools, due to their weight. In some conditions they can be a drag. So I always question myself if I would spend the whole day in one of those SL ski (like the one we are discussing, or a Head Rebels iSL FIS, stiffest ski I've ever tried) . On the other hand, I would in a Hero ST TI, for example, so trading a bit of the top performance for a bit more versatility. But this is just a personal biased opinion.


Regarding the FIS GS they are quite manageable, if you care to ski them right (sometimes the long radius is a problem, but if you have enough mountain, go a bit faster, you hit the sweet spot), so I think it can definitely work for you. Trick is not to go too long (increases versatility, controls stiffness), especially because you are not on the heavy side (the weight is important when you are contextualising ski info, me as a heavier skier, so take this in consideration)

I have an old Head R25 and I keep hearing the new ones are even more fun (R30 womens and R35 for men).

I've used to ski several Atomic D2 GS (R18) and when I was comfy with it, I also had no issues with some of the FIS ones I've tried.

As for the Hero ST TI, nothing wrong with it in my book. It's right there with the top consumer SL skis, with the iSL, D2 SL, etc
post #11 of 14

No offense, but personally I tend to give this advice to everyone asking if FIS skis would suite them. If you need to ask this question, then avoid those skis. Seriously. If you are able to ski them properly, then you know this without anyone on any forum giving you nod. If you don't know if you can handle them, then you can't handle them.

post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post

No offense, but personally I tend to give this advice to everyone asking if FIS skis would suite them. If you need to ask this question, then avoid those skis. Seriously. If you are able to ski them properly, then you know this without anyone on any forum giving you nod. If you don't know if you can handle them, then you can't handle them.

Well, the thing is FIS skis are not easy to demo, so it's understandable the hesitation (I was lucky I could use such shop, but even after that I was a bit apprehensive when I first bought my FIS GS) . Heck, sometimes it's hard even to get more advanced skis in the proper length in some rent shops.

Maybe a way of knowing if it's your cup of tea would be to ask if you can handle the top consumer version
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post
 

No offense, but personally I tend to give this advice to everyone asking if FIS skis would suite them. If you need to ask this question, then avoid those skis. Seriously. If you are able to ski them properly, then you know this without anyone on any forum giving you nod. If you don't know if you can handle them, then you can't handle them.

Non taken. I guess I'll just wait till next winter, try them out and then decide based on that - that's probably the smartest move. 

 

I'm sure I can handle them, but getting most out of them and skiing them the way they're intended is not the same.

 

I've never had any problems with top consumer versions.

 

Thank you for tips IceCookie and Ghost, I'll have to try some proper GS skis in the future if I can get my hands on them. For the really dodgy conditions I can always take out my freestyle/freeride skis and mess around. 

 

How about the 'feeling' of the 2008 vs 2015? I understand, that the 2015 skis are faster, but it's still the same 'cup of tea', right? :)

post #14 of 14

As to choosing between SL and GS (or SG:devil:):

In my experience, given a competent pilot, it all depends on where you ski most often.  On a small hill (less than 300' vertical) there is no point in getting anything with a longer turn radius that 13 m, or 15 m with a very flexible ski.  You would need half the hill to get up to speed and only be able to make a few really good turns before you're at the bottom, Same for SG, if you have a typical 650' vertical, you will only get a couple of really good turns before needing to shut it down at the bottom, not worth it.  Also if you don't like to ski fast, no point in GS; you get more turns per dollar with the SL.  However if you have the hill for GS(>400' vertical), and buy a decent GS ski, you may soon find that you like skiing fast.

 

Also if you are trying to decrease your times on race courses, you will appreciate some tip-rocker or early rise or whatever they are calling it, because it will forgive some of the error you have pushing it at the limit and allow you to make the gate.  On the other hand if you have no gates to make and have come to appreciate the precision and joy of arc-2-arc skiing on a fully cambered traditional profile skis, like the Fischer WC SC, you will hate it.

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