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Demo Bindings

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I have the opportunity to buy a nice binding ski setup, previously demo skis. The skis are in good shape, but I want to know if anyone has serious reservations of skiing on Demo rail bindings.
Any input appreciated.
Tks
post #2 of 20
I would say that you should have the same reservations as when buying any used equipment. Check to see how old the bindings are and what model they are. If they are similar to what you would purchase anyway, just with a demo plate, and they're in good condition I'd buy them. I've purchased demo skis before and used the bindings for a while - no problems.
post #3 of 20
Thread Starter 
Altagirl
Thanks for the advice its encouraging that you had no problems w/ the demo plate.
Any opinion on the Marker Titanium 1200 speedpoint bindings
post #4 of 20
I don't want to dissuade you from buying skis at all, but I wouldn't count on demo bindings having nearly the life expectancy of regular bindings. In my experience leaving a demo binding at the same setting permanently (as you will most likely do) will result in side-to-side play developing in the heel piece potentially causing injury and, worse, embarrassment as you double-eject directly under KT-22 on a pow day. This particular set of bindings were Salomons, but the same may be true for all bindings. The heel pieces are built to be easily adjustable in set increments, not sturdy enough for every-day rockin'.
Buy them anyway, put the demo bindings on your rock skis, and get some Look P12s. Thank me later.
post #5 of 20
What happened to the Cunning Linguist, the First?
post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally posted by The Cunning Linguist2:
I don't want to dissuade you from buying skis at all, but I wouldn't count on demo bindings having nearly the life expectancy of regular bindings. In my experience leaving a demo binding at the same setting permanently (as you will most likely do) will result in side-to-side play developing in the heel piece potentially causing injury and, worse, embarrassment as you double-eject directly under KT-22 on a pow day. This particular set of bindings were Salomons, but the same may be true for all bindings. The heel pieces are built to be easily adjustable in set increments, not sturdy enough for every-day rockin'.
Buy them anyway, put the demo bindings on your rock skis, and get some Look P12s. Thank me later.
Anyone else share this opinion????
post #7 of 20
I bought skis at an on mountain demo shop in 1998 and I have not had any problems at all. I have skied about 15 days a season since then. I changed the setting of the demo bindings once to allow a friend to use my skis. Other than that, I haven't done anything to change the skis/bindings. My demo bindings are Salomons, by the way. So, in summary, based on my experience, assuming the bindings are not too old, have not been abused, etc, the fact that they are "demo," by itself, would not bother me...
post #8 of 20
I think demo bindings are a "crap shoot" at best, since you don't know how long and often they have been used and how well maintained.Also they tend to be heavier than regular bindings.

As to the Marker Titanium 1200's: I used them all last season, and found them to be very versitle, most user firendly, and probably the best binding I have ever owned.

[ November 20, 2002, 01:34 PM: Message edited by: wink ]
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally posted by wink:
I think demo bindings are a "crap shoot" at best, since you don't know how long and often they have been used and how well maintained.Also they tend to be heavier than regular bindings.
Are the demo rails themselves likely to come loose, wobble, etc? I'm wondering whether assuming normal use (15-20 days a year) the demo rails will become the ski's weak spot before other deteriorations begin. I guess people who have actually used demo rails for a few years would be able to answer this.
post #10 of 20
Like I said, I have never had a problem. I think demos are as much a crap shoot as any other used product. I would assume that a reputable demo shop knows how to and does take good care of its equipment, but who knows that may be a false assumption... Also, I would not buy demo equipment that is more than one year old... but that is just me...

But, I digress, in answer to your question, my experience has been positive. The demo bindings have performed perfectly and i have had no problems at all.
post #11 of 20
I bought a pair of Rossi X with demo Salomon's they spec'ed right but prereleased all the time. Salomon replaced them at no charge. They were 4 years old.

Over the years I have bought many demo skis with demo bindings. The bindings are much less of a problem than the skis. They wear longer and have longer warranty.

Mark
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally posted by megadeth:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by wink:
I think demo bindings are a "crap shoot" at best, since you don't know how long and often they have been used and how well maintained.Also they tend to be heavier than regular bindings.
Are the demo rails themselves likely to come loose, wobble, etc? I'm wondering whether assuming normal use (15-20 days a year) the demo rails will become the ski's weak spot before other deteriorations begin. I guess people who have actually used demo rails for a few years would be able to answer this.</font>[/quote]I have never had this problem and I am an agressive 230 lb skier.

Mark
post #13 of 20
There was a recall on Speedpoint bindings. It was on last season's Marker site, though it is now not listed ( on their '03 site). I would contact Marker to find out the potential problem.
post #14 of 20
Thread Starter 
John J
Thanks for the info. I just called Marker and it turns out that some speedpoints were recalled last year. For anyone else with a set, if you look on the toepiece where is says duel direction technology, there should be a black dot there to indicate that the bindings are good. If there is no dot, you should take them to a certified marker dealer for free replacement.
post #15 of 20
In response to Mpsot, I am pleased that your experience with demo bindings has been a positive one. The post regarding not buying any binding that is more than a year old is good advice.

Remember, the factory reps, will often take the demo bindigns from the previous season, and put them on the current products.
Not all reps, but enough to make you think twice. I have seen skiers blow out of demo bindigs, even when cranked all the way to the maximum din.

There are two sides, and since bindings and their proper release are key to skier's well being in falls. I cannot see the logic in taking any chances when it comes to safety.

If the ski shop that does the adjustment and testing of same feels confident in them, you have some protection and options if the binding should fail.

I do wonder if the binding manufacturers warrant these as they do any of their other products? If they do, maybe it is not such a bad deal, but for me I think, "Why chance it ?"
post #16 of 20
Quote:
Originally posted by wink:
In response to Mpsot, I am pleased that your experience with demo bindings has been a positive one. The post regarding not buying any binding that is more than a year old is good advice.

Remember, the factory reps, will often take the demo bindigns from the previous season, and put them on the current products.
Not all reps, but enough to make you think twice. I have seen skiers blow out of demo bindigs, even when cranked all the way to the maximum din.

There are two sides, and since bindings and their proper release are key to skier's well being in falls. I cannot see the logic in taking any chances when it comes to safety.

If the ski shop that does the adjustment and testing of same feels confident in them, you have some protection and options if the binding should fail.

I do wonder if the binding manufacturers warrant these as they do any of their other products? If they do, maybe it is not such a bad deal, but for me I think, "Why chance it ?"
Wink:

See my posts above. Salomon replaced my bindings, which were demos and were more than 4 years old without question. They sent me a pair of 2003 S 12's (I think. They were this years DIN 12 binding). My local shop and I both agreed that I shouldn't ski on a binding with a max DIN of less than 14 so they swapped me up to the 2002 S 14 at no cost (they did charge a small fee to remount, but it was more than reasonable).

The skinny on the binding problem - I would prerelease. The shop rat and I went through and torque tested the bindings and found they were dead on. I don't think the springs were to blame. It may have been setup or wear but it was really frustrating, since most of the time I would simply loose the ski without much effort (i.e.: I lost a ski in some dips. I came through compression and up and off the lip and lost the ski, no turn involved).

Out of 10 or so demo ski I have purchased in the last many years this is the only binding problem. The more frequent problem is that the skis are tired and tend to loose rebound within 20 or 30 hard skiing days. I tend to buy these skis as an extra pair and as rock skis for the coming season.

My view: don't worry about the bindings as much as the skis, particularly if you are big and aggressive. If you do have binding problems, contact the mfr and they will likely comp you a pair. Always have your shop torque test any used binding and set the DIN for you. Then take them home and crank them down how you like after a few runs.
post #17 of 20
Are you buying the skis and bindings from a shop you trust? If its a shop you always deal with, they should assure you that everything is in perfect working order and stand by it. I have purchased 4 pairs of demo skis (with bindings) from my local shop over the past several years and have never had a problem - great service from the shop and saved myself some serious cash in the process.

If you are buying the skis / bindings from a shop you don't usually deal with, the skis and bindings themselves might tell you what kind of condition they are in. If they are scratched to hell and have chips missing from them, I would hazard a guess that they have been abused and would recommend passing on them. If they look like they have been pampered, then I say take them and have your local shop perform an overhaul to ensure that everything is well lubed etc. As for demo bindings being a hazard since they are usually stuck on a single din setting, I never adjust my din except at the end of the year to release pressure, but most patrollers I ski with don't even do that and they have never had a problem with their bindings.

Best of luck.
post #18 of 20
I have to second the buying from a good shop comment. If you trust the shop you should be able to trust the gear they're selling you (new or used), trust that they've tested the bindings, and they should work like new. In the event you run into problems with them they should back them up and set things right. If they won't do that, they shouldn't be selling the demo bindings - they should be trashing them and selling the skis only! From the way I see it, if a shop won't mount or adjust bindings they think are too old or not working properly for liability reasons, why on earth would they SELL you something dangerous.
post #19 of 20
They are easy to steal :-(
post #20 of 20
Binding Manufacturers will go out of their way if they suspect there is a problem with any of their bindings, especialy in this country where we use the courts to solve just about everything.

That's fine, but what I am concerned about is that used bindings are like a used cars. You just don't know how it has been used or misused, especially a demo binding. A ski, you can flex and look at the wear and tear. If a binding has a lot of marks and dings on it, then you know it has been through a lot.

I am surprised the ski shops are so willing to sell the used skis[ along with the used demo bindings ] without some type of paperwork acknowledging that the buyer is aware that it is a used product and purchases and uses same at their own risk.

The liability exposure is just too enormous not to, but maybe they are doing it anyway.

Well, I think this horse has had its run, and further discussion and disagreements would only unnecessarily whip the horse.
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