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"Reverse Pizza" problem

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

So I saw a video of me skiing the other day, and I definitely do the "reverse pizza" when I ski. As in, my inside ski points further to the inside than the outside ski, resulting in the shape of a reverse pizza.

 

Any tips on how to solve this?

post #2 of 11

What you are doing is referred to as "divergence."  It results when your skis are not turning simultaneously and equally.  Since more active turning forces are being applied to the tip of your new inside ski, try bringing those forces further back on the inside ski; i.e., try turning from your feet, particularly the new inside foot, rather than further ahead on the ski. 

 

There are two parallel railroad tracks in the snow ahead of you.  Your task is to place your feet in those tracks at all times (straights or curves).

 

Good luck!

post #3 of 11

Find center. Diverging tips are, in my experience, wholly or partially caused by being slightly aft. Find center first then see if further attention to the issue is needed.

 

fom

post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 

Perfect, thanks guys, I'll give that a try.

post #5 of 11
Wishbone
post #6 of 11

Ah, if only all the world's problems could be solved so easily!

post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdred View Post
 

So I saw a video of me skiing the other day, and I definitely do the "reverse pizza" when I ski. As in, my inside ski points further to the inside than the outside ski, resulting in the shape of a reverse pizza.

 

Any tips on how to solve this?


Diverging tips often happen from leaning in; being aft is usually coupled with leaning in.  If the skier is leaning in (banking) the whole body at the start of turns to get the skis to edge, that puts too much weight on the inside ski.  It turns faster than the outside ski, thus it diverges.  

 

If this is the case with you, you can try edging the skis from the snow up instead of using the whole body as a unit.  First, to start a turn, tip the new inside ski with your foot, bending that foot sideways at the ankle (inside the boot) onto its little toe edge.  The other foot should follow, but if it doesn't you can focus on both feet.  

 

Keep your feet back up under you as you do this.  Do not let them slide out to the side.  In particular, hold that inside ski back up under you; don't let it slide forward. This may feel like you are sliding the foot back; that's fine (as long as you don't shift the hip over it back too).  Keeping your feet under you should help you to keep your weight over that new outside ski, where it should be. 

 

Are you skiing now?  Where are you?  

post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 


Diverging tips often happen from leaning in; being aft is usually coupled with leaning in.  If the skier is leaning in (banking) the whole body at the start of turns to get the skis to edge, that puts too much weight on the inside ski.  It turns faster than the outside ski, thus it diverges.  

 

If this is the case with you, you can try edging the skis from the snow up instead of using the whole body as a unit.  First, to start a turn, tip the new inside ski with your foot, bending that foot sideways at the ankle (inside the boot) onto its little toe edge.  The other foot should follow, but if it doesn't you can focus on both feet.  

 

Keep your feet back up under you as you do this.  Do not let them slide out to the side.  In particular, hold that inside ski back up under you; don't let it slide forward. This may feel like you are sliding the foot back; that's fine (as long as you don't shift the hip over it back too).  Keeping your feet under you should help you to keep your weight over that new outside ski, where it should be. 

 

Are you skiing now?  Where are you?  

Thanks!  That's really good to know. I'm in Colorado so have another week or so to start practising this before the long summer.

post #9 of 11

I'm jealous; New Englander here.  

post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 

Yes, I truly do live in the promised land.

post #11 of 11
Indeed! My skis has been in storage for almost 2 months now, how could people there not be good when they can ski for 60% longer? biggrin.gif
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