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Ski Joring - Is there a technique?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

This one's for @Tog, but I full expect others to chime in. 

 

I saw this video of Chris Anthony's crash while Ski Joring and it reminded me of the discussion we had during apres' ski at ESA Stowe about Ski Joring.  IIRC Tog had some ideas about it. 

 

My question is this.  Is there some technique to this or is it just brass balls? (please don't get cranky about saying balls) 

To me, it looks like you're at the mercy of the horse. 

 

 

post #2 of 25

Wow! Only in America, painful but that is quite the sight. 

post #3 of 25
There's skijoring with horses here every year as part of Winter Carnival. They practice in advance if they have sense, but the participants are rarely surprising. They are the ones with... As you say. The article mentions some techniques.

Skijoring can also be done with dogs. It's not quite as exciting. My family used to do it.
post #4 of 25

How can the organizers and participants in that video be so stupid as to set up a jump with a flat landing?

post #5 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

How can the organizers and participants in that video be so stupid as to set up a jump with a flat landing?
Stupid? What do you mean? Didn't you see the face plant? That is exactly what the flat landing is for ... Entertainment!
post #6 of 25

I'm guessing a little more snow on the landing would have helped. The coefficient of friction on pavement is problematic.

post #7 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

How can the organizers and participants in that video be so stupid as to set up a jump with a flat landing?

Looks like a flat landing is standard. Skijoring Whitefish Montana Saturday Januray 25, 2014: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLA0ovas5v_jBwcEdd4D5MIN3TIh0PggOk
post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

...

Skijoring can also be done with dogs. It's not quite as exciting. My family used to do it.

 Yes best crashes in that case normally involve things like two or more dogs splitting a tree, but no air.

post #9 of 25

www.mitteleuropa.X10.mx

post #10 of 25

On Thursday, Feb 5, 2015 I returned from skiing at Beaver Creek and found a Skijoring competition taking place beside my motel in Minturn, CO.  It was very cool and had a frenetic, almost circus-like energy.  And Trekchick is right, the horse/rider/skier threesome start off like a bat out of hell and charge as fast as they can on a flat, straight course for about 1/4 mile.  I think there were two, maybe three jump ramps, each about 5-6' high that the skier had to go over and also at least two sets of three or four rings in between that the skier had to try to grab as they raced by.  Winning score was based on speed and number of rings collected.  Not sure if any style points were given for looking good/in-control while doing the course?  As a non-equestrian, one of the things that seemed a little sketchy to me was that the racing surface on the course consisted of a chopped-up mix of slush and mud that was about one foot deep in many places. Could a horse lose footing and take a bad fall in that stuff? None did, but I saw a couple skiers wipe out.  They had an announcer doing the race call who kept saying, "don't worry folks, we have a veterinarian onsite monitoring today's race for safety."  The event was part of the RMX Skijoring Tour.

 

Here are a few pictures:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #11 of 25

Ski Joring techniques. 1. hang on to the rope 2. don't fall down 3. if you do fall then for gods sake please let go of the rope.

post #12 of 25

Skijoring with dogs looks a bit more accessible and still fun! Some of these dogs look really into it; others look like they're just out on a leisurely walk :) 

 

 

I'm thinking this is mostly a way of getting out and having fun with your dogs. Can you get a good speed boost from a well trained, strong and fast pooch? 

post #13 of 25
I didn't use to do it, my husband and daughter did. I tried it once on his cross country skis, told him he was out of his mind to have two Siberians racing through the woods with so little control and bought him some touring skis with half metal edges (boot area only, so as not to slice up the dogs). I switched to my alpine skis that day as it was so terrifying. YMMV
post #14 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by MidwestPete View Post
 

www.mitteleuropa.X10.mx


We used to do this!  Only without the skis, and without the ropes.  

 

Buffalo, NY, late '60s. Snow covered road, stop sign, grab the back bumper of the car, and skid on your shoes.   I had a pair of flat-soled, ankle-high boots that worked great.  Converse (or Keds) sneakers also worked well.

post #15 of 25
As a long time hookie bobber and ski jouring w/ a horse it's mostly adjusting to the gait by using your arms. The Grey and the Bay are pulling and even with bad footing they can run 30 or so.
post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

Skijoring with dogs looks a bit more accessible and still fun! Some of these dogs look really into it; others look like they're just out on a leisurely walk smile.gif 




I'm thinking this is mostly a way of getting out and having fun with your dogs. Can you get a good speed boost from a well trained, strong and fast pooch? 

Less boost on a very hilly course, but a lot on a flatter one. The dog can make a flat course feel like a moderate downhill stretch. Even skate technique changes a bit with the dog. A good sprint dog - there r a few types of mixes with things like pointer and greyhound - is really cool athletically.
Edited by CTKook - 5/23/15 at 5:48pm
post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 

Skijoring with dogs looks a bit more accessible and still fun! Some of these dogs look really into it; others look like they're just out on a leisurely walk :) 

 

[snipped video]

 

I'm thinking this is mostly a way of getting out and having fun with your dogs. Can you get a good speed boost from a well trained, strong and fast pooch? 

Can get a little more of an idea of the speed with one dog in this video.  Training in northern Michigan.

 

 

For real speed, get two well-trained dogs.  Skijoring 2012 Three Bear sled dog race in Land-O-Lakes, Wisconsin.

post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by SlowObstacle View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MidwestPete View Post
 

www.mitteleuropa.X10.mx


We used to do this!  Only without the skis, and without the ropes.  

 

Buffalo, NY, late '60s. Snow covered road, stop sign, grab the back bumper of the car, and skid on your shoes.   I had a pair of flat-soled, ankle-high boots that worked great.  Converse (or Keds) sneakers also worked well.


Did that as a kid in Montreal on slippery days, only grabbing the back bumper of a city bus to go a couple of blocks, without permission of bus driver (or anyone else).


Edited by Ghost - 5/24/15 at 8:26am
post #19 of 25

When I was stationed in NC (along the flat coast) I took my husky skijoring but I was on roller blades.  I would much rather bounce off the snow than pavement.  First time out I didn't even make it out of the driveway before I crashed.  When back inside and put on all my son's safety equipment.  We eventually got pretty good and she loved it.  I did too until a squirrel crossed our path.  She had an amazing prey drive. She never figured out that the roller blades don't work well on grass and dirt.  The only jumps I ever did was curbs when she saw a critter she wanted.  

 

It was fun.  Best dog I ever had.

post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post
 

When I was stationed in NC (along the flat coast) I took my husky skijoring but I was on roller blades.  I would much rather bounce off the snow than pavement.  First time out I didn't even make it out of the driveway before I crashed.  When back inside and put on all my son's safety equipment.  We eventually got pretty good and she loved it.  I did too until a squirrel crossed our path.  She had an amazing prey drive. She never figured out that the roller blades don't work well on grass and dirt.  The only jumps I ever did was curbs when she saw a critter she wanted.  

 

It was fun.  Best dog I ever had.


This is why it is so important to know when to let go of the rope.

post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatoldman View Post


This is why it is so important to know when to let go of the rope.

With horses yes. Dogs get tethered to you aside from the rope. You can see it in the video above. My biggest problem was I wasn't much on skates. She was only about 55# but she could run and had four legs. If I were to do it on snow, I might look into something like blades or a short slalom ski.

It was funny to watch her reaction if we were going out. If I was taking her on a walk, I would get her leash and her tail would start wagging and she would show she was happy. If got her harness and traces out, she would start howling and running in circles and be bouncing around. I don't think anything made her happier than that.
post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 


Did that as a kid in Montreal on slippery days, only grabbing the back bumper of a city bus to go a couple of blocks, without permission of bus driver (ore anyone else).

When I was a kid in Peterborough, Ontario, they didn't plow the side streets right down to the pavement, and rarely used salt or sand. It made a perfect surface for road hockey -- and boot-joring behind the cars of unwitting motorists. At a stop sign, you could sneak up behind a car, squat down, grab the bumper and ride along for a block or two.

We could also put on our skates at home and skate a couple of blocks to the outdoor hockey rink.

post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by SlowObstacle View Post
 


We used to do this!  Only without the skis, and without the ropes.  

 

Buffalo, NY, late '60s. Snow covered road, stop sign, grab the back bumper of the car, and skid on your shoes.   I had a pair of flat-soled, ankle-high boots that worked great.  Converse (or Keds) sneakers also worked well.

 

We called it "hookie-bobbing" and it was a common activity for us in the late 70's at night in Government Camp.  I remember a drunk kid getting his legs run over by a jeep with huge tires (lucky for him) and walking away without injury.

post #24 of 25

With dogs, it is best with two or three, they can really pull and compete with or motivate each other.  With my dog, I'd need a long pole with a hot dog dangling off of it in front of his nose.

post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 


Did that as a kid in Montreal on slippery days, only grabbing the back bumper of a city bus to go a couple of blocks, without permission of bus driver (ore anyone else).

 

We didn't always have permission from the cars, either.  If they spotted us and objected, sometimes they stopped. Sometimes they sped up.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Utagonian View Post

 

We called it "hookie-bobbing" and it was a common activity for us in the late 70's at night in Government Camp.  I remember a drunk kid getting his legs run over by a jeep with huge tires (lucky for him) and walking away without injury.

 

We called it "pogeying."  No clue where the term came from.

 

All the adults cranked about how dangerous it was.   But I never heard of anyone getting hurt that grabbed onto a bumper.  One kid tried grabbing onto the edge of the wheel well on a school bus.  That did not end well at all.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by slipshod View Post
 

When I was a kid in Peterborough, Ontario, they didn't plow the side streets right down to the pavement, and rarely used salt or sand. It made a perfect surface for road hockey -- and boot-joring behind the cars of unwitting motorists. At a stop sign, you could sneak up behind a car, squat down, grab the bumper and ride along for a block or two.

We could also put on our skates at home and skate a couple of blocks to the outdoor hockey rink.

 

We had back yard hockey rinks in Buffalo. No salt or sand on side roads, and no hope of plowing down to the pavement.  We left there in 1974, and I still think it's not really winter unless you're driving on snow.   Now we live in MN, where at least sometimes (not all the time) it does look like winter, in the winter.

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