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Haney's online lessons

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

Anyone here using Haney's online lessons ?

 

I signed up and so far am happy with the results.  First, I am an old guy at 73yrs and my drives had fallen off to 180-185 yards in the air.  After adopting a new grip and new swing plane I have now a consistent 210 yards with occasional 240.  I am very happy with this $69.00 expenditure so far.  Just curious if anyone here has tried Haneys lessons and how and what worked for you.

post #2 of 25

I've been watching the free ones. I hate to pay for the lessons when I've seen so much of his stuff already between the Haney Project and the free videos.

 

I'm 58 now. 2 years ago my drives started deflating down to about 240. I got a Somax hip trainer, an orange whip trainer and a lesson and got my drives to 260-280. This year I got a new driver and couple more swing tips from my fitter and I'm hitting 280-300 pretty consistently on full swings. One of the swing tips I'm using this year is the conscious swing to the right that Hank encourages. I'm using that instead of a stronger grip when I want to draw the ball. The other Haneyism I'm using is the swing faster not harder thing. The range whip and speed swoosh trainers are great for making sense out of this nonsensical advice.

 

It's hard to say if Hank has helped. Between the golf channel shows, the golf mags, the revolution golf videos etc(also looking at Tewell's square to square clips) I am a voracious consumer of golf tips. Yesterday I watched the morning golfers and then caddied in the afternoon for our local US open qualifier tourney and learned a lot from watching scratch golfers play tournament holes. I also learned a lot from playing practice rounds with guys in the weeks prior to the tourney, the local USGA guy before the tournament as he set up (we talked about selecting pin locations, green speeds and green firmness) and from the super/asst super as they worked on getting the course ready. I think I learned more from these scratch golfers playing my home course then I do from working Shotlink at the pro events. We had the same pin positions today as the tourney yesterday and I tried to play the same strategies as the big boys, but from shorter tees. I can see some of it helping, but I'm still clearly 2-3 big breakthroughs/levels away from these guys. Clearly at my age some of the options for improvement aren't attainable (i.e. youth), but they guy I caddied for was 50 and I played a practice round with one older guy who was shorter off the tee (but more consistent). Hank is pretty clear that most of his "commercial" stuff is intended to get people to the single digit level. Although the stuff he does with pros is based on the same principles, it's clear to me one needs another level on the volume knob to get from single digits down to scratch.

post #3 of 25
post #4 of 25

^^^^^

First, I continue to be a big fan of Jim McLean as an instructor, he has a many fine video's available at no cost on YouTube. I do think the video Rusty offered above needs some caveats as it differs from many instructional materials. In his 8 Step Book, McLean separates swing types into 2 types: a) arm swingers and b) body swingers. Fred Couples is an arm swinger, as are most junior golfers, they swing with minimal body effort (I am an arm swinger trying to become more of a body swinger). Most tour golfers ie Nicklaus, Trevino, Sergio etc are body swingers in that they use the large body muscles and movements to power the swing. So, to my thinking, there is value in the video regarding how to swing your arms and/or how to teach a better swing to those with bodies less supple than they were in youth. But, for sure, it is not a simple fix for the great majority of golf swings.

 

Pete,

Could you expand a little more on how the Haney video's focus on your particular problems to find the one or two things that can produce faster improvement.? I've taken several on the "on-line" questionnaires to find a quick fix, never been happy with the choice of questions or the proposed improvement. BTW, most teaching pros will tell you that if they ever try to change a grip on the first lesson, they will never see the student again. So good on you for making a grip change, there are so many golfers who play with crappy grips. I, too, have watched Haney on the Golf Channel, he professes to teach, first, an on-plane swing...which is a very good thing. If you like the improvement to-date, the cost is minimal. Are there recurring monthly costs to continue?

 

My personal favorite golf instruction series is the Golf Channel's School Of Golf with Martin Hall. Last night, the episode was titled "Geometry of the Golf Swing" and delt with the on-plane swing. His simple test(s) of very quickly convinced me that I an swinging too much inside to outside -  a long standing issue in my swing. I intend to work on this in the next 2 days, I'll revisit this tread and announce how it went.

 

The paradox of golf instruction is we all want better ball flight, pro's can only teach us better movement patterns.

post #5 of 25

Rats - I wanted to teach the ball how to fly better.

post #6 of 25

I hooked up once with a golfer  (played to about a 12-14 I'd guess) who told me that as a birthday gift, his wife once bought him a 1 hour private lesson with Craig Harmon.  At the beginning of the lesson Craig told him that his (Craig's) goal was that by the end of the hour the student would feel at least one true "pro quality" swing. Balanced and with maximum club head speed. The fellow told me that he felt he'd gotten his money's worth as he had felt two pro swings. And he never felt that swing again.

post #7 of 25


FWIW:  After a lifetime of playing mediocre golf I decided to really try and improve my game.  I realized that I had so many ingrained habits that golf lessons would undoubtedly be an expensive process of attacking one symptom after another of a fundamentally flawed swing, so I decided to rebuild it from the ground up.  I got the old Hogan book  Five Lessons: The Modern Fundamentals Golf, written in 1957.  The basic book is only about 100 pages with lots of drawings.  I picked up a copy at a used bookstore for $2.00.  It is really only four lessons with a summary for easy reference when you are done.  The chapters are the grip, stance, backswing and downswing.  Hogan not only explains what to do, but makes you understand why you need to do each thing a certain way.  His whole concept is that a good golf swing should make you feel good, which was nice since my back used to start hurting on the second nine.  Now I not only score better, but I can play 27 holes without a hitch.

 

I am extremely happy with the results and would highly recommend this approach, most of which does not require time on the driving range.  When things start getting out of whack a review of the drawings and text in the Summary get me focused on the basics again and usually quickly reveal the source of my problem, and how to fix it.  After playing since I was a kid I finally feel for the first time that I understand what I am supposed to be doing.  It has transformed my mindset and rejuvenated my love of the game.  If you are just trying to fix one problem Haney or another good instructor can be the answer, but in my case "back to basics" was what I needed to get lasting improvement.

post #8 of 25

I got Hogan's book. For the life of me it was boring reading and did not help. That's just my bad. It's all good stuff as evidenced by how many current instructors make references to it in their lessons.

 

Funny, I consider my golf mediocre at an 8 handicap, but I "think" I get 1-2 "pro" swings a round. I had 2 drives today that were 290+ and split the fairway. Of course a pro would have hit a 3 wood to get the same distance, but it is nice to hole out from off the green now and then or make putts from > 20 feet. It's those swings that keep you coming back. Sometimes it's even better to hit a shot that makes your buddies give you the "stink eye" (where did THAT come from?).

post #9 of 25

290 would rank you 19th on the PGA so what's holding you back? Time wasted posting on Epic instead of banging balls?:)    Today's drivers were once illegal. 99 pound Korean girls hit it farther than Jack did.  How far do you hit your 7 iron? And what happened to the other 14 drives that didn't split the fairway at the 280+ mark?

 

You must play with a lot of club champs for 8 to consider yourself to be mediocre.

 

7 iron - So Jack is giving a clinic and a question comes from the audience, "Mr. Nicklaus, how do you get the ball to spin so much that it will hit the green and back up? Jack: "How far do you hit your 7 iron?  Answer comes back, "130 yards". Jack: 130 with a 7? Why would you want it to go backwards?"

post #10 of 25

7 iron goes 160 with the easy swing. I expect once the temps get over 80 I'll bump my stock yardage up 10 yards. I'm already getting a little long on my clubs. If I could do that and have a consistent swing I might get a nod and a smile out of a Champion's tour player. And that would still only be a 1/4 of what I would need to just be able to lose respectably at that level.

 

290 would rank me 19th on tour if that was my average and not my peak. With the winds at my course I get my share of 200 yard drives that are 60 yards off line to go with the 290s that are straight. Which is why "experience that one pro swing" rings so true in my ears. When I bought my driver my swing speeds ran from 95-105. Based on that I guess that my really really good swings top out at 110. This chart at golfwrx about max driver distances fits my experience.

 

I caddied for our local US Open qualifier last Monday. My golfer was age 50, but we had a ton of kids in the tourney. You had to have a 1 handicap or better just to get in. I watched one guy drive the green on a 360 yd par 4 and one in my group drive it 340 on a par 5. After I saw these guys overpower my long course, drop approach shots dancing all around the hole, get a ton of up and downs from off the green and make pro percentages of long putts, I know I'm at least two levels below those guys. I get hot enough to have one facet of my game at their level on a rare day or get a 9 hole score at their level on a rare day under casual conditions. They get their performance in all facets in tournament rounds. Compared to that I'm mediocre.

post #11 of 25

When you realize that someone with a scratch handicap has no chance on the PGA Tour it illustrates how good those guys really are.

post #12 of 25
People don't realize how courses are set up difficulty wise for tour events vs. the courses we play as amatuers. I used to play at TPC Avenel in Potomac, MD and had a chance to play it right after the Kemper was played. It was night and day from the typical layout in terms of green speed, farway cut, rough height, etc. It was unreal how tough it was.
post #13 of 25

And yet ....

 

I got a good laugh from the US Open qualifier at our local course. The greens were running 12 and were so firm I heard a lot of competitors "whining" ok remarking how firm they were. I saw more than a few "typical" shots rejected off the green. I play almost every day and I chat often with the super and his asst. I'd have said "Sorry guys, but if it wasn't for the USGA guy running the event the greens would have been even firmer and running at 12.5.", except I wasn't sorry. Since every pin location was "fair" for the competitors, overall they were easy compared to what we normally see. I've been to Congressional and Pebble Peach when they were set up for a US Open and for that I've had to agree that the courses were set up at least 2-3 rating strokes more evil than the course most golfers would see and probably 7-10 strokes harder for the average golfer. I've also witnessed Torrey Pines with its defenses up.Yowza!

post #14 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Living Proof View Post
 

^^^^^

First, I continue to be a big fan of Jim McLean as an instructor, he has a many fine video's available at no cost on YouTube. I do think the video Rusty offered above needs some caveats as it differs from many instructional materials. In his 8 Step Book, McLean separates swing types into 2 types: a) arm swingers and b) body swingers. Fred Couples is an arm swinger, as are most junior golfers, they swing with minimal body effort (I am an arm swinger trying to become more of a body swinger). Most tour golfers ie Nicklaus, Trevino, Sergio etc are body swingers in that they use the large body muscles and movements to power the swing. So, to my thinking, there is value in the video regarding how to swing your arms and/or how to teach a better swing to those with bodies less supple than they were in youth. But, for sure, it is not a simple fix for the great majority of golf swings.

 

Pete,

Could you expand a little more on how the Haney video's focus on your particular problems to find the one or two things that can produce faster improvement.? I've taken several on the "on-line" questionnaires to find a quick fix, never been happy with the choice of questions or the proposed improvement. BTW, most teaching pros will tell you that if they ever try to change a grip on the first lesson, they will never see the student again. So good on you for making a grip change, there are so many golfers who play with crappy grips. I, too, have watched Haney on the Golf Channel, he professes to teach, first, an on-plane swing...which is a very good thing. If you like the improvement to-date, the cost is minimal. Are there recurring monthly costs to continue?

 

My personal favorite golf instruction series is the Golf Channel's School Of Golf with Martin Hall. Last night, the episode was titled "Geometry of the Golf Swing" and delt with the on-plane swing. His simple test(s) of very quickly convinced me that I an swinging too much inside to outside -  a long standing issue in my swing. I intend to work on this in the next 2 days, I'll revisit this tread and announce how it went.

 

The paradox of golf instruction is we all want better ball flight, pro's can only teach us better movement patterns.

 

 

Sorry late getting back to you, been on a fishing/golfing trip in Oregon and Washington.  No recurring monthly costs.   I have missed a lot of info. that is on my computer for being out of range fishing.  Basically what is working for me   1) change in grip to a much stronger grip    2)a flatter swing plane which has really upped my distance and accuracy   3) swing faster not harder-this is a work in progress as I often confuse them.  The other thing Haney says is to swing a hundred swings a day (just the swing no range, no ball) and although I don't make a 100 swings (my back won't allow) I do just go outside and make 10-20 or sometimes 25 swings and do believe this is helping.  After a few rythmic swings I can start adding the FAST without the hard. 

 

Normally the tips I pick up on Golf mag's etc. only screw up my already bad golf game.  I have taken lessons from different pro's and have never noticed any inprovement and usually regress.

 

Right now I am having trouble with my follow thru and pull a lot of shots.  It is just natural for me to finish around myself to the left-probably from years and years of swinging a bat.  When I do come thru correctly my accuracy is really good, distance has improved and I am happy with the Haney program.   

 

Let me know how you're doing.

post #15 of 25

Pete,

 

I did some searching on Haney on-line instruction and I'm not sure what program you are using. There is a program where you send in a video and get specific instruction for your swing. I know he has other programs where you fill an on-line question air about ball flight, then get a general recommendation. Could you post a link the the program you are working on? 

 

I remember Haney's Golf Channel instruction, and, there was always the 100 swings a day concept. It is difficult for me to go the a driving range and get quality swings for 40 balls. I have a minor tweak in my back from a recent practice session and that has me doing core muscle exercises that i stopped after ski season. I've long believed that when I am playing well my body swings easily and my back is not problematic. When I play poorly, it is immediately felt in my back muscles. 

 

Below is a Haney video that covers hitting behind the ball which is an old nemesis.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-J_o-c456sQ

post #16 of 25

Hank Haney's Blueprint

 

Beware the 14 day trial of the online university which is $29.month after the trial.

post #17 of 25

Yes beware or the monthly charge. I kept deleting most of the videos thinking it was spam. I'd spent $90 before turning it off. :(

 

Rusty, your distance increase over the past two years is really commendable and almost unheard of for an older golfer - congratulations.

 

I find the Haney "swing out" instruction difficult to repeat. All I do is hit into the trees on the right.

 

I recently re-read my books by Kostis and Flick. Both concentrate on the ARM swing like the McLean video. Jim Flick says that while pros concentrate on full body turn and release anyone with a double digit handicap almost certainly needs more hand and arm action. He compares that to pros and low handicappers who are concerned about avoiding the hook while the other 98% of avid golfers are fighting the dreaded outside-in swing pattern. Looks like McLean is in their camp.

 

Took a Golf Digest School decades ago. Instructors were all well known. We had very early low quality video but no measures of swing speed or path.  Kostis showed us that he could hit a drive about 220-230 from a three legged stool with his right leg tucked under the stool. His point was his best drive at the time with full body and leg activity was about 250. Off the stool he clearly could only use his arms and hands so he figured the swing speed was about 90% arms and hands.  I've never forgotten that lesson - except when I'm on the course twisting my body into my best Rory imitation  

post #18 of 25

Well I did have similar distances about 5 years after starting to play golf in my 40s. But my swing was so inconsistent in length and direction that hitting a straight 300 yard drive once in 20 tries wasn't very impressive compared to army golf (230 yards forward and 50 yards left or right) the other 19 times. Then I had 4 seasons of shoulder trouble with restricted swings. I came out of that with the shorten the backswing and swing at 80% max approach. As I entered my 50s and started getting my handicap down I finally started hitting more drives consistently in the 270 zone and busted an occasional one (record long was 367 yds). But concurrent with some ski trainers noticing tightness in my right hip ( I sat on my butt for a living for 35 years - go figure!), my drives started shrinking in my mid 50s. This miracle increase in length recently is due to a lot of rehab work (including a Somax trainer), some lessons and new gear. Gary Player said "The harder I practice, the luckier I get". This late life miracle increase in length was just the result of focused effort (the harder I work, the longer I get?). The thing about skiers who golf is that we usually have such a strong core that it's relatively easy to get some decent distance.

post #19 of 25

Thanks for the insight. I have library full of golf books including history, biography, architecture and instruction but never heard of the Somax. Sounds interesting. In fact I've played some of my best golf with what instructors told me were overactive hips that opened too much and too fast.  Their explanations never made sense to me but I've tried to use the instructions with mixed results.  I'm going to try and get some of the effect with some exercise bands attached to a pole to see if that can create some of the same resistance.

post #20 of 25
Remember, men lie about three things. How tall they are. What their golf handicap is. And how long their schlong is.

Unless you play 36 holes a week, you'll never improve your consistancy, which is the name of the game in golf.
post #21 of 25
Thread Starter 

Interesting veiwpoints.  Although I have added length I still can't score consistently.   Am still working at being a decent golfer but in all thruth it probably will never happen but the journey is always interesting.

post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by joe strummer View Post

Remember, men lie about three things. How tall they are. What their golf handicap is. And how long their schlong is.

Unless you play 36 holes a week, you'll never improve your consistancy, which is the name of the game in golf.

And how long they drive the golf ball. Everytime someone who has about a 15 handicap tells me they drive the ball 280 I call BS. The PGA driving average is usually around 285. The LPGA average us usually around 245. I had a club pro tell me once he'd expect a male 5 handicap to drive the ball around 240 and everybody above that to be 220-230.

Oh and before anyone mentions pros hitting 3 woods off tees and that lowering the tour driving average, note they designate 2 holes per round for measured drives. They select holes set up to use a driver and they even select 2 that are in opposite directions of one another to offset the wind. Also think about the fact that if the tour average is 285, there's a bunch of pros driving the ball much less than than 285.
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post

Interesting veiwpoints.  Although I have added length I still can't score consistently.   Am still working at being a decent golfer but in all thruth it probably will never happen but the journey is always interesting.

Scoring is in the short irons and the putter. My youngest son is a 2 handicap. He can drive the ball well but from 180 and in he's always around the green and can really chip and putt. That's where he practices when he can.

Think of it this way. If a tour pro hits a green 65% of the time, how often are we going to hit a green?
post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by joe strummer View Post

Remember, men lie about three things. How tall they are. What their golf handicap is. And how long their schlong is.

Unless you play 36 holes a week, you'll never improve your consistancy, which is the name of the game in golf.

Not true. I lie about how tall I was, how long my drives are and what my schlong handicap is. And I play 228 holes/week, so make that 4 things we lie about

post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveturner View Post
 

Thanks for the insight. I have library full of golf books including history, biography, architecture and instruction but never heard of the Somax. Sounds interesting. In fact I've played some of my best golf with what instructors told me were overactive hips that opened too much and too fast.  Their explanations never made sense to me but I've tried to use the instructions with mixed results.  I'm going to try and get some of the effect with some exercise bands attached to a pole to see if that can create some of the same resistance.

There's a lot about the Somax promotion that makes me squeamish. For me it was affordable enough at the time to afford an experiment. It worked well in terms of its effect on my golf game and I was pleasantly surprised about the aerobic effects as a bonus. I've stopped using it because it has aggravated back issues (my bad). I do a ton of shoulder exercises with resistance bands clipped to a pole bolted to a wall in my bedroom (similar to what I worked with in physical therapy). They just aren't anywhere near what the Somax was doing. I am doing a rotation exercise holding a 9 lb medicine ball to my chest. I'm also using the Orange Whip trainer and the Speed Whoosh trainer. Using the trainers and the ball approaches the same thing that the Somax was doing.

 

The Somax claim that small increases in hip speed translate into huge increases in club head speed sounds like typical golf marketing mumbo jumbo. I can't say I fully believe this. But I can say I've felt it and I have personally achieved significant results similar to the claims. It does seem to explain why high end skiers tend to have longer than average driving distances (we've got a lot of practice with our legs turning underneath our hip against resistance and stressing max separation of upper and lower body). And it fits with common advice to achieve lag and turn the hips through to face the target. It seems odd to me that, if I recall correctly, the hips are supposed to stop turning before contact with the ball. Unless there is a kinetic chain effect why would it matter how fast the hips moved prior to contact?

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