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Spin Bike Workout

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Does anyone know how to properly train on a  spin bike for skiing? i know the US Ski Team uses spin bikes but have no idea how they use them.  I started out doing typical spin class workouts varying level and intensity, but I've also read somewhere that longer more moderate workouts are better for ski legs. 

 

I've tried searching but couldn't find anything on-point. In fact what I did was confuse myself more than anything else. 

 

I'd appreciate some input if anyone has some.  Thanks as always this is a great community.

post #2 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lpass View Post
 

Does anyone know how to properly train on a  spin bike for skiing? i know the US Ski Team uses spin bikes but have no idea how they use them.  I started out doing typical spin class workouts varying level and intensity, but I've also read somewhere that longer more moderate workouts are better for ski legs. 

 

I've tried searching but couldn't find anything on-point. In fact what I did was confuse myself more than anything else. 

 

I'd appreciate some input if anyone has some.  Thanks as always this is a great community.

 

The key is to get 3+ easy sessions in per week, where you stay below the point where you get out of breath, and go for 45 minutes +.  On top of that, you do want to layer on some harder interval work as well.

 

The problem with doing all of this on a spin bike is that, for many people, it's boring.  So, many people have more success getting the aerobic base work in by mixing in activities like mountain biking, inline skating, steep hiking, and such.  Depending on the specific activity, several of those also have more movement carryover to skiing.  You certainly can do both types of training on the spin bike, though.

post #3 of 9
no kidding, boring.
And if you want to work your legs, lift weights.
Biking outside is more sustainable, because is more enjoyable.
post #4 of 9

http://www.athlete.2xu.com/5-exercises-1-x-secret-tip-improve-skiing-performance/

 

Here's a good read which imo may be a bit advanced as far as weights but also covers the aerobic / ski legs side well.

post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks good read!

 

"It’s not uncommon for athletes to gently cycle for at least an hour per day in order to build and maintain their aerobic base."

 

I wish they defined 'gently' a little better, but it gives me a much better idea of how to best prepare. Appreciate the link, thanks!

post #6 of 9

Baseline cardio training is done by measuring your heart rate and maintaining the ideal percentage of maximum.

 

Interval training can get up to 80-90% easy.  Long Slow Distance (LSD) training is typically done at about 70%.

 

Do some reading on HR training and cardio zones and get a monitor of some kind.

 

Then do what Kook suggested, finding some cardio that keeps you in a reasonable range for your baseline training.

 

The spin bike is better for the Interval Training in that it's easy to control your Heart Rate and it's less boring as so much attention is going to it.

post #7 of 9

I guess everyone is different. Personally I'm with @rod9301: Whenever you can possibly manage it, do something outdoors that is intrinsically fun and distracting so that you are not as aware of the pain. If it's fun you will WANT to do it over and over again rather than coming to dread it. Plus if you play your cards right you will get a lot of side benefits like better eye-foot coordination, sense of dynamic balance at speed, overcoming of fear, etc., etc., etc. Doesn't mean there is no place for the gym for certain things. There is, of course. But to me the "certain things" are like side dishes, not entrees.

 

I SUPPOSE some people may feel about the gym they way I feel about real cycling or hiking or whatever. However, deep down my most prejudiced and evil self suspects they're the same ones who enjoy daytime TV. :devil:

post #8 of 9

How you use a spin bike depends on what other work out you do and what your goals are. I wouldn't get too hung up on the scientifically optimal work out regimen unless you're going for serious competitive skiing. For the average skier it's more a question of finding the time to do anything. If spinning is your only exercise than I would vary the routine--long (30 minute +) at relatively low resistance and high rpm for endurance, and high resistance interval pedaling at low rpm for strength. Ideally, though, you would find as many different ways to exercise your legs and the rest of you as you can--both to alleviate boredom and to use more muscles in more different ways. High heart rate stuff and lower heart rate stuff. Throw in some plyo--box jumps are excellent and you can get a lot of benefit in a short period of time. I only use a 15 inch box, my kid uses 4 feet--6 sets, working from 8 jumps per set up to 20 or more. Apparently the main benefit is not from the jump up but from the landing. I would think running would also give you some plyo benefit--from the impact phase. High weight strength work is good to protect the knees but won't do much for your endurance, which is the main thing skiers need to work on.

 

Or you can join a crossfit gym and get into the cult thing and quit skiing so you can hang out at the gym more.

post #9 of 9

This is something you can also discuss with your spin class instructor.   

 

Each class and instructor has different appeal which can be motivating (or demotivating) to different people.   Some are more lovey dovey we're in this together as a team; others are more competitive/aggro and race away from everyone else.  Even with a particular instructor, they may switch the focus of to each class (e.g. "climbs" versus "sprints" versus whatever).  

Hopefully wherever you are going has a rotation of instructors and class styles you can sample.  

 

If you're doing this not in a class, it's pretty easy to lookup different spin workouts online (you can even find youtubes and/or audio downloads, (but maybe you are getting what you pay for).

 
If you want to double up sometimes; you can do a shorter spin class (say 30-45min), but don't use up your whole tank, and then stack on additional strength workout afterwards.
 

And I'll admit, perhaps spin class overall is not motivating for some and you'd prefer to do something else, and some people will always look down gym folks and why would you want to spend time in a sweaty gym when you can do the "real thing" outside, but that's beyond the point.  (see discussions on why don't you just learn to ski powder on skinny skis for similar logic)

 

Look into yourself, and if your alternative to the gym is sit on the couch and watch the game, and getting out on a real bike is a ludicrous proposition (to you); perhaps spin class is enough of a "crutch" motivation for you to at least get in a workout and reach your fitness goal.


Edited by raytseng - 5/23/15 at 10:07pm
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