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Which 3 Skis for Intermediate-Advanced Intermediate?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

Hoping to get some insight on these skis! Am currently an Intermediate skier trying to progress this upcoming winter. Used a 156cm past winter and am thinking of getting a little longer 166cm. Would like to hold on to a pair of skis that will eventually help me as I increase my skill level. Thanks in advance!!

 

2015 Atomic Nomad Blackeye Skis with XTO 12 Bindings $399

2015 Rossignol Experience 80 Skis with Xelium 110 Bindings $455

 

2015 Volkl RTM 75 Skis w/4Motion 10.0 Bindings $399

post #2 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by stanelz84 View Post
 

Hoping to get some insight on these skis! Am currently an Intermediate skier trying to progress this upcoming winter. Used a 156cm past winter and am thinking of getting a little longer 166cm. Would like to hold on to a pair of skis that will eventually help me as I increase my skill level. Thanks in advance!!

 

2015 Atomic Nomad Blackeye Skis with XTO 12 Bindings $399

2015 Rossignol Experience 80 Skis with Xelium 110 Bindings $455

 

2015 Volkl RTM 75 Skis w/4Motion 10.0 Bindings $399


Welcome to EpicSki!  In order for anyone to provide useful advice, they need to know more about you and your skiing.  Suggest you check out the five questions that are most important.  Certainly a good idea to shop around right now for good deals.

 

http://www.epicski.com/a/five-key-questions-when-buying-new-skis

post #3 of 22
Thread Starter 
  1. Where in the world are you skiing? Northeast

  2. What kinds of terrain do you prefer (groomed runs, moguls, race course, park'n'pipe, trees, steeps, backcountry/sidecountry) Prefer groomed

  3. How many days a year do you ski? 3 months

  4. How advanced are you as a skier? Intermediate Blue-Double Blue runs

  5. What's your height and weight? 5'8" 165lbs

post #4 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by stanelz84 View Post
 
  1. Where in the world are you skiing? Northeast

  2. What kinds of terrain do you prefer (groomed runs, moguls, race course, park'n'pipe, trees, steeps, backcountry/sidecountry) Prefer groomed

  3. How many days a year do you ski? 3 months

  4. How advanced are you as a skier? Intermediate Blue-Double Blue runs

  5. What's your height and weight? 5'8" 165lbs

 

3 months = 90 days?

post #5 of 22
Thread Starter 

Yes KingGrump

post #6 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by KingGrump View Post

 

3 months = 90 days?

 




Really you ski 90 days a year and are only an intermediate skier ?
90 ski season = Alot of practice experience from my perspective


Kyle
post #7 of 22
Stan, Imho, the Nordica Nrgy 80 is a fantastic ski that will do it all now and through the learning curve. If you ski 90 days, you'll eventually get a wider pair of skis for powder days and travel west.
post #8 of 22
It's tough to get 90 days in of skiing when the season is roughly that long. Are you an employee? Also wondering how after 90 days you are only claiming intermediate. We allow "advanced" here. :-)

After 90 days, I'd put you on something longer, like 170-174-ish. Beyond that, no opinion except maybe time to take lessons to up your game. Maybe the 90 days is anticipated for next season, as opposed to happened last season?
post #9 of 22
Thread Starter 

You hit the target Sibhusky, I plan on skiing that much next season. MarkoJP, I keep hearing great things regrading the Nomads, especially turning. They have a "ARC" system to really assist in the turning radius.

post #10 of 22

If you really get in 90 days next season and seriously work at improving you will be bored to death with the Atomic before you're half way through the season.  I've skied the Ti version and my thoughts about it were that it would be a great ski for someone in their mid to late 60's who just wants to cruise along and not have to do much work.  A friend and I were demoing skis at Big Sky and have the same boot sole so we swapped skis after a couple of runs and his reaction was exactly the same as mine.  They aren't bad skis, just boring and no snap to them.  I would agree with markojp about the NRGy 80, but I might go him one better and recommend the new Nordica Fire Arrow 80 or the new Head Strong Instinct Ti(83mm), either one as close to 170 as you can get.  These are both pretty snappy skis that will seriously reward improving technique but not punish you as you progress.  I've skied them both and am buying a pair of the Heads because they were so much fun and I already own a pair of 84mm skis which I plan to keep.  And don't get hung up on marketing terms like "ARC."

 

But, all that said, the most important thing you can do for your skiing is not skis, it is boots that fit your feet properly, fitted by an expert, not just some kid in a store.  If your boots don't fit, as in 1-2 sizes too big(extremely common), you won't be able to control your skis and it won't matter whether you're on $20 skis or &1,000 skis.

post #11 of 22

How about Latigos?

 

I haven't had a chance to ski them but am impressed with Blizzard's Freemountain series and love my Bonafides. At 115-78-102, Latigos would seem to be a nice fit for groomed NE slopes and with Ti construction could hold up well for the 90 days you're aiming for next season. . The come in 170cm but if you are really going to ski a lot and presumably improve in the process, you may be better off going longer.

 

Perhaps we can get a Latigo owner or 2 to chime in?

post #12 of 22

Stockli Laser AX is worth a look along with the Head Instinct.

post #13 of 22

+ one on getting the best boots you can get from the best fitter you can find.  If you have to travel to get the right fitter, do it.  I've driven 200 miles before.  I have good shops close by now but it isn't unusual to chat with people who flew in to get boots fitted.  It is that important.  You'll do WAY better in the long run in good boots and you may need new liners by mid season.  Others may disagree but I think most liners are good for 50-60 days of skiing and shells for 100-200 days.  The right boots get the most from your lessons, practice AND your skis.

 

Also + one on getting a higher performing ski if you are going to put in 90 days next season but...

 

What are your goals next year?  Are you planning on just hanging out with your pals or really working on your technique?  Are you taking lessons or clinics?  Are you hoping to really learn to carve?  Do you want a ski that makes it easy to get down the hill and keep up with your friends while you are free to reinforce all of those bad habits or one that takes more work and pushes you to become an advanced skier?

 

If carving groomers in an skilled and athletic way is on your agenda and you have boots that are up to the task, I would look at the softer, short radius carvers.  Before I get flamed, the "race" skis here are not that hard to ski if you are still learning to carve but the "ah-ha" moments are clearly communicated and you won't be bored.  Great quote from realskiers: "The i.SL behaves like a true race slalom with excellent manners; it knows it can do more than its handler can, but it has the decency not to show it."

 

If you ski smaller, crowded, hills, go with the shorter 12-14M radius.  These kind of skis will help you learn by giving instant feedback when you are doing things right or wrong.   (sorry I know Head's line best but others do similar things)

ie:

Head i.sl

Atomic Redster Doubledeck 3.0 SL

Volkl Racetiger SL Speedwall UVO

 

A bit bigger radius:

Head i.supershape Speed

Head i.Supershape Titan

Head i.Supershape Magnum

Head i.Supershape Rally

 

 

 

Less feedback but easier skis like the Atomic Blackeye will allow you to be lazier but offer less excitement and feedback IMHO:

Blizzard Latigo

K2 AMP Rictor 82 XTI

 

At the end of the day it depends on what you want from your day.  Is skiing an "activity" or a "sport"?

post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by stanelz84 View Post

You hit the target Sibhusky, I plan on skiing that much next season. MarkoJP, I keep hearing great things regrading the Nomads, especially turning. They have a "ARC" system to really assist in the turning radius.

Okay, I know others have already asked this, but I'm kind of dense sometimes, so please humor me and answer again. How many individual distinct days did you spend ACTUALLY SKIING last season? (I.e., we are not asking what the elapsed length of your season is.)
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by stanelz84 View Post
 

Hoping to get some insight on these skis! Am currently an Intermediate skier trying to progress this upcoming winter. Used a 156cm past winter and am thinking of getting a little longer 166cm. Would like to hold on to a pair of skis that will eventually help me as I increase my skill level. Thanks in advance!!

 

2015 Atomic Nomad Blackeye Skis with XTO 12 Bindings $399

2015 Rossignol Experience 80 Skis with Xelium 110 Bindings $455

 

2015 Volkl RTM 75 Skis w/4Motion 10.0 Bindings $399


Out of your choices, I vote for the RTM 75.

post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Utagonian View Post
 

+ one on getting the best boots you can get from the best fitter you can find.  If you have to travel to get the right fitter, do it.  I've driven 200 miles before.  I have good shops close by now but it isn't unusual to chat with people who flew in to get boots fitted.  It is that important.  You'll do WAY better in the long run in good boots and you may need new liners by mid season.  Others may disagree but I think most liners are good for 50-60 days of skiing and shells for 100-200 days.  The right boots get the most from your lessons, practice AND your skis.

 

Also + one on getting a higher performing ski if you are going to put in 90 days next season but...

 

What are your goals next year?  Are you planning on just hanging out with your pals or really working on your technique?  Are you taking lessons or clinics?  Are you hoping to really learn to carve?  Do you want a ski that makes it easy to get down the hill and keep up with your friends while you are free to reinforce all of those bad habits or one that takes more work and pushes you to become an advanced skier?

 

If carving groomers in an skilled and athletic way is on your agenda and you have boots that are up to the task, I would look at the softer, short radius carvers.  Before I get flamed, the "race" skis here are not that hard to ski if you are still learning to carve but the "ah-ha" moments are clearly communicated and you won't be bored.  Great quote from realskiers: "The i.SL behaves like a true race slalom with excellent manners; it knows it can do more than its handler can, but it has the decency not to show it."

 

If you ski smaller, crowded, hills, go with the shorter 12-14M radius.  These kind of skis will help you learn by giving instant feedback when you are doing things right or wrong.   (sorry I know Head's line best but others do similar things)

ie:

Head i.sl

Atomic Redster Doubledeck 3.0 SL

Volkl Racetiger SL Speedwall UVO

 

A bit bigger radius:

Head i.supershape Speed

Head i.Supershape Titan

Head i.Supershape Magnum

Head i.Supershape Rally

 

 

 

Less feedback but easier skis like the Atomic Blackeye will allow you to be lazier but offer less excitement and feedback IMHO:

Blizzard Latigo

K2 AMP Rictor 82 XTI

 

At the end of the day it depends on what you want from your day.  Is skiing an "activity" or a "sport"?

 

 

He's a self professed intermediate. A Titan, Magnum, or Speed? And an iSL? ? Give him a couple seasons to work out his mechanics, not get his butt kicked by gear. 

post #17 of 22
My wife is a timid intermediate and LOVES her i.SL's.  She demoed them and wanted to buy them half way down the first run.

They really helped her with technique too.  She calls them her "talking skis".
 

Again, he needs to tell us what he wants beyond "progress".  90 days of drills and hard work on carving up the groomers with good fitting boots and real skis like these and he won't be calling himself an intermediate next year.

post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Utagonian View Post
 
My wife is a timid intermediate and LOVES her i.SL's.  She demoed them and wanted to buy them half way down the first run.

They really helped her with technique too.  She calls them her "talking skis".
 

Again, he needs to tell us what he wants beyond "progress".  90 days of drills and hard work on carving up the groomers with good fitting boots and real skis like these and he won't be calling himself an intermediate next year.


Correct.  There is nothing quite like spending a good amount of time on snow with  a one-step-down from a true racing ski SL (you forgot to include the Fischer RC4 WC SC ;)) and a well fitted pair of boots for assisting improvement.  You have to be committed to learning how to ski, and not looking for too much forgiveness or you wont like it quite so much.  

post #19 of 22

The reward and fun are big.

post #20 of 22

Now it is sale season, keep an eye out for Kastle's. I got a new MX78 w/bindings for $400.00 the year before. Easy skiing and yet lots of potential to grow into. May not want to get them too long though as fully cambered.

post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post
 

If you really get in 90 days next season and seriously work at improving you will be bored to death with the Atomic before you're half way through the season.  I've skied the Ti version and my thoughts about it were that it would be a great ski for someone in their mid to late 60's who just wants to cruise along and not have to do much work.  A friend and I were demoing skis at Big Sky and have the same boot sole so we swapped skis after a couple of runs and his reaction was exactly the same as mine.  They aren't bad skis, just boring and no snap to them.  I would agree with markojp about the NRGy 80, but I might go him one better and recommend the new Nordica Fire Arrow 80 or the new Head Strong Instinct Ti(83mm), either one as close to 170 as you can get.  These are both pretty snappy skis that will seriously reward improving technique but not punish you as you progress.  I've skied them both and am buying a pair of the Heads because they were so much fun and I already own a pair of 84mm skis which I plan to keep.  And don't get hung up on marketing terms like "ARC."

 

But, all that said, the most important thing you can do for your skiing is not skis, it is boots that fit your feet properly, fitted by an expert, not just some kid in a store.  If your boots don't fit, as in 1-2 sizes too big(extremely common), you won't be able to control your skis and it won't matter whether you're on $20 skis or &1,000 skis.

 

I demoed the Atomic Smoke Tis and while I found them stable they also didn't have any zazing to me and I was pretty sure I'd be bored with them pretty quickly.  My boyfriend has the Atomic Blackeye Tis and they were fine for a season or two but he now exclusively skis his RTM 81s and the Atomics collect dust.    The atomics aren't bad skis just don't seem to have a lot of life. I have heard fabulous things about the Fire arrow and am considering them myself for a frontside/ice ski for this upcoming season.   I second the boots being the most important thing, skis are secondary.

post #22 of 22

Fischer Motive 80. Can handle all sorts of snow, not too beefy, but stable enough to progress to advanced and up. Great ski.

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