or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Boot Sizing and Modifying Question - Tecnica (second ...)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Boot Sizing and Modifying Question - Tecnica (second ...)

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
So I have a small problem. I'm getting new boots after 6 or so years on my old ones. I've discovered that in my boot of choice, the Icon Alu Comp, I am between sizes. The 25.5 is a shade too tight and the 26 is a touch roomy. The forefoot and heal fit is great in the 25.5 but the length is a little tight. My toe is pretty sn ug to the end even in full flex foreward. If I was still racing I would get the 25.5 no questions asked, but I haven't been that foolish for almost 10 years.

Is it easier to modify a boot to make it a bit smaller or a bit bigger?

Is it better to do one or the other?

I'm thinking of grinding a touch out of the inside of the toe on the small one or adding a bit on the too large size. I'm a little wary of grinding plastic, but I also don't want to get a pair of boots that I have to fill up with a bunch of junk to make them fit right thereby defeating the performance of the boot. I'm relatively close to the Tecnica factory in NH so I I may get in touch with someone over there and se if they can tweak them a bit, but I thought I check if anyone here had any ideas.

Ideally I need a 25.75 ... sounds a little absurd doesn't it?

Thought's on this one?

[ November 19, 2003, 01:30 PM: Message edited by: Bosephus ]
post #2 of 16
It is easier to make a boot bigger. My boots are Salomon equipe 9 and are 24.5, and were a really tight fit lengthwise in the shop, so they stretched them. They were warmed and left for a day with some sort of clamp inside. I was very dubious to this working, but it did.

The liner will also pack out over time and if you choose the larger boot it may become very sloppy in a short time.

Check also if the actual shells of the two boots are the same often they just use a thicker liner or internal sole in the same shell(my Salomon boot shell is for 24.0 and 24.5).

Hope this helps
post #3 of 16
Quote:
Originally posted by Bosephus:
Is it easier to modify a boot to make it a bit smaller or a bit bigger?

Is it better to do one or the other?

I'm thinking of grinding a touch out of the inside of the toe on the small one or adding a bit on the too large size. I'm a little wary of grinding plastic, but I also don't want to get a pair of boots that I have to fill up with a bunch of junk to make them fit right thereby defeating the performance of the boot. I'm relatively close to the Tecnica factory in NH so I I may get in touch with someone over there and se if they can tweak them a bit, but I thought I check if anyone here had any ideas.
It's much better to buy the smaller one and have it ground or punched. You can't really make a too-big boot smaller. I'd suggest finding a good boot fitter and having them grind/punch for you.

ssh
post #4 of 16
Don't even think about making boots smaller , dosn't work . Between sizes 25,5 and 26,0 is so colled " shell jump " I think ,becouse Tecnica has same shell for two liners .You may want to do modification by heating the front part of toe box in well equiped shop .
post #5 of 16
My last pair of "race fit" boots were stretched and ground every way possible, they skied great, and I still nearly lost both my big toes from a third-degree frostbite a couple of years ago. I would never buy another pair of shoes that didn't allow my toes to move freely BEFORE I paid for them.
Why are you so committed to these boots? There are pleny of fine boots available and most of them are less expensive then Tecnicas, especially if you can avoid grinding, punching and modifying.
Go for the bigger shell, or just accept that a Tecnica won't fit and look for a different boot.

Regards, John

[ November 19, 2003, 09:09 AM: Message edited by: John Dowling ]
post #6 of 16
I don't have personal experience with the Icon ALU, but in the Explosion 8 and Icon Carbons I have had, the liners packed down a lot in the first few days of skiing. They packed down so much that I had to put shims in the boots to take up excess volume.

There are numerous boot fitting tricks to increase toe room, including grinding the inside of the shell, grinding the boot board which goes under the liner, and cutting some small slits in the liner in front of the toe to relieve pressure.

Jim
post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by John Dowling:

Why are you so committed to these boots? There are pleny of fine boots available and most of them are less expensive then Tecnicas,
Regards, John
I have a connection for Tecnica's so the price is right.
post #8 of 16
bosephus...

it seems incongruent

which is THE deciding factor?

me - I have sacrificed some comfort for performance. And, I will spend more for a better boot... not spend less for a lesser boot.

kiersten
post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by kieli:
bosephus...

it seems incongruent

which is THE deciding factor?

me - I have sacrificed some comfort for performance. And, I will spend more for a better boot... not spend less for a lesser boot.

kiersten
Well the right price is free, so there us a big difference between choosing to spend $100 more or spending $750 more. I took a few runs on a pair of Icon's last year and I like the performance and the fit in everything except length.

It's not like I'm going to turn around and decide to spend $750 just because the sizes are a milimeter or two off. Bottomline is that I'm getting Tecnica's ... it's just a question of how to make them fit and which size to start with.
post #10 of 16
I'd definitely go with the smaller size. You're always better off modifying a tight boot to fit than trying to fill in empty space. If it fits well everywhere except one spot - fix the spot. If it was tight everywhere it would be a different story.
post #11 of 16
In general I agree with the approach that it is easier to make the smaller boot bigger than it is to make a big boot smaller. I'm going to throw out 2 ways to make the bigger shell work for you. First, try HotForm. In clinics I've been told it takes up extra space inside the boot but I haven't tried it. Second, use a custom foam liner.

I jumped from 25.5 Salomon Course with a stock liner to a 26/26.5 Salomon Course Top Fit that included the custom foam liner. After two years in each my feet are much happier in the custom foamed larger shell and they perform better. This year I'm using a Tecnica Icon XT in 26/26.5 with a Conformable custom foam liner, tongue and custom footbed. The liners haven't arrived yet but I'm pretty psyched to set them up!

Aar
post #12 of 16
The key to making a custom foam liner work is having a good boot fitter do the work. Particularly the boot fitter should beexperienced in custom foaming boots. If you don't use a boot fitter who is experienced with foam liner I can tell you a number of the tricks. Some of them call for judgements that need to be made by the person doing the work. You are better off with a stock liner than a poorly done custom foam boot.

Aar
post #13 of 16
Bosephus, boots free.
Go spend the money with a good boot fitter. My Alu's are ground out not heated. I good fitter can do wonderful things for your feet.
post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the input folks.

I think I'm going to go with the 25.5 and work with it. I tried them on again last night and the 26 is definitely bigger than the 25.5 is small... if that makes any sense. I'm going to take them to Paul at My Feet First in Plymouth NH for a custom bed and any necessary shell mods. With free boots I don't mind spending a couple hundred to tweak them in just right.

Hopefully I'll be rippin' on them come Thanksgiving weekend!
post #15 of 16
That's great, I'm sure they'll have you ski in them for a couple of day's before they do any boot grinding. This is a slow process. You don't want to take to much off. I'm sure the fitter will take care of you.
post #16 of 16
Odds are that your custom footbed will do the trick. I had always heard the logic about footbeds raising your arch and thus holding your feet in their natural position making them up to one size smaller. I never realy bought into this idea until I went to by a new pair of boots and discovered that just like you, I was between sizes. The boot fitter convinced me to go with the smaller boot and a footbed. They have been the best boots I have ever had in regards to both comfort and performance.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Boot Sizing and Modifying Question - Tecnica (second ...)