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Summer Exercise appropriate for Skiing

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Ok, ski trips are going to get harder to do for me. No local anything is open anymore. In Summit County, there won't even be water for lawns.

So, to help for a possible Chili or Palmer Snow Field trip and to stay on top of things:

1. Tipping Board
2. Wobble Board
3. Carvers (roller blade like ski simulators that work with your ski boots)
4. Biking

These are all on the agenda.

Anyone have experience or thoughts on the Skiers Edge all mountain machine?

Any other Ski simulators/trainers to recommend?
post #2 of 19
By tipping board, do you mean like a Pivit board, Vew-Do board, etc?

Also, do you already have Harb Carvers? Which model? How do you like them?

And finally, to answer your question, I've read that mountain biking is excellent ski cross training because you practice speedy decents, looking ahead, and bravery. The steeper and more technical the better.
post #3 of 19
Hi John!
If you do a search in just about every forum on this web site, you will probably fing at least 10 topics about skiers edge. Awhile ago, d-chan tried to get them all into the fitness section, but there may still be some scattered about.

As far as general ski conditioning goes, its a good idea to focus on a system, as opposed to a specific product. I wrote about this extensively in this thread:
The Ultimate ski conditioning program

You are right on target with use of "balance toys." In addition to those you mentioned, I give Hosannas to the Bosu and dyna disc. There are lots of topics on these toys in the fitness forum.

But while its important that ski fitness programs focus on training the movement, rather than just the muscles, the best programs would focus on all aspects of fitness.

Biking can certainly cover the aerobic portion of your program, as well as inline skating. Many professional athletes do an integrated training plan, where a balance exercise is followed by a strength exercise that uses the same muscle groups. Many examples can be found in the Ultimate ski workout. If you have many alignment problems, you should consider taking a Pilates class.
Good Luck!
http://www.ski-fitness.net
post #4 of 19
You make think this silly but I'm a huge fan of trampoline training for: core stability, air awareness, crash technique, dynamic balance, and cardio. Not to mention, it makes you feel like a kid again!

Find a real tramp - not a Walmart special...
post #5 of 19
NOT SILLY! Tramps Rock!
post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the replies.

The carvers I got were actually the first production ones made. I got the normal slalom model (I think, there is no label on them). Whatever, they are the ones recommended for carver newcomers. They are not the "race" ones.

The most immediate sensation that you get is - don't get in the back seat or too forward. You'll pay immediately. You learn how to adjust your fore and aft balance or you fall. Thus you learn it. This translates well to skiing.

The action of going from edge to edge is just like skiing. I didn't get to do much with them yet as we started to get our own ice and snow conditions just after I got them. I did get a couple of nice days last October and was on them a couple of hours total. I'm looking forward to getting them out again now that our streets are clear.

I'm not a big roller blader. I have blades, but I found the carvers, since they use your already aligned ski boots, were much more neutral and easy than my roller blades. They work in a similar fashion, but with two edges they act like skis with more of a definate release and edge switch. The other nice thing about them for ski training is you turn by tipping. If you have any movements that would make your skis skid you will become instantly aware of them as you can't use any type of skidding movement on the carvers. (unless you want to fall)

I would recommend, unless your a roller blader already, get the safety gear out. As you refine your skiing movements on them, you will refine them or fall. I never actually fell yet, but I sure came close lots of times due to the total lack of forgivness in fore to aft balance. I would think some of these benifits would for fore and aft balance would be true of the little short carving skis I've seen on the slopes. (the 3 footers)

I tramped as a kid, but my back doesn't like compression of landing from sports like basketball. So, I'm not sure about that approach in my case. But interesting thought. I bet it would be a great core workout.

Thanks to all again.

Sue, you probably don't have to worry about summer conditioning as you can pop up to the palmer snow field all summer. I was up there for a week last august. It was quite a blast - not a lot of variety, but great training. (and just to be skiing in North America in August is fun in and of itself)

Nice web site Lisa!
post #7 of 19
Warren, Lisamarie, any details on tramp suggestions? It's always fun to goof around but I bet there's more to it. I'm especially interested in any suggestions for full-size tramps -- not the mini-tramps in gyms or on the "urban rebounding" link I think Lisamarie posted recently.

Thanks for any info on this.
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Sue, you probably don't have to worry about summer conditioning as you can pop up to the palmer snow field all summer. I was up there for a week last august. It was quite a blast - not a lot of variety, but great training. (and just to be skiing in North America in August is fun in and of itself)
Believe it or not, I've never been to Timberline. But I will be going to PSIA's GS camp there this June. As for skiing there all summer, uh, it's expensive! Also, I'm sure you know that skiing doesn't keep me in shape for skiing. I need way more help than that . I'm liking the trampoline idea -- I've always wanted one.
post #9 of 19
Who makes these carvers, then?

I fancy a pair! :
post #10 of 19
Harb makes them, Nettie. Here's a link:
http://www.harbskisystems.com/carver/models.htm
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally posted by suebrown:
Harb makes them, Nettie. Here's a link:
http://www.harbskisystems.com/carver/models.htm
Hey! I've just found a use for my old skis and bindings. : [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

There's videos of the carvers in action too...

Diana 2.5 Mb

Harold 4.8 mb

MA any one?
post #12 of 19
Ta all!
post #13 of 19
BigE, if you're looking for a way to use your old skis and bindings, this may be just the ticket!
post #14 of 19
Thread Starter 
Oh - that's funny! Javilin turns with the bindings on the very back.

Just goes to show the equipment junkies (me for one) that technique is more important than the equipment.

Well, Sue, Timberline in June is not a ski resort, but a ski rectangle divided into lanes (the "Palmer Snow Field" - (a snow field is just like a glacier except they can call it that because it does not move)).

You know how every loves "powder". At Timberline in the summer, they throw down salt to help keep the melt down (not sure the physics of that, but that's what everyone told me). The goal is to make the slopes as icy hard as possible. If your camp supplies free demo skis, with all the salt they are a great option.

A typical morning, get up at 6, warm up at 6:15, quick breakfast, hit the slopes by 7am. Self practice and warm up runs till 8am. Move over to your assigned "lane" where your camp is being run. Ski till 10am. At 10, "reset the course", which means smooth out the ruts, move the poles/gates a bit, lay out more salt. Wait about 10 minutes for the salt to set (think cement), for the course to get rock hard, then ski till 12. By 12 things get too mushy so its down the hill. At our Masters Camp, each evening was filled with summer sports activities like mountain biking, white water rafting, golf (boring), hiking, windsurfing, often in 90 degree temps.

I highly recommend the summer timberline experience to anyone that hasn't done it. At our camp, there were people that had been coming 13 years in a row. The average was 5 years in a row.

The hotel is a "depression era make work project" work of art, that no one could afford to build a hotel like that now-adays.

Even if your not skiing Timberline Lodge is worth a trip.

Your in for a fun time.
post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 
Oh - and for the equipment junkies - government camp - the little town 6 miles down the mountain from Timberline, becomes a ski manufactures town where you can demo and try out all manner of skis, many the next years models.

You also will see people testing skis with the skis covered up.

There are people from all over too. There was a group from Japan running a camp next to our lane last August.

Our camp ran a tuning demonstration in the evening. I was so new to skiing I didn't really get much of what they were describing. Now that I want to start tuning my own stuff, I need to kick myself. There was the Atomic Factory tuner, their expert of experts giving a clinic and I didn't know my bevel from my naval.

Fun week. My son and I should know in a few days if we are going again. That or Chili. (both?)
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally posted by ts01:
Warren, Lisamarie, any details on tramp suggestions? It's always fun to goof around but I bet there's more to it. I'm especially interested in any suggestions for full-size tramps -- not the mini-tramps in gyms or on the "urban rebounding" link I think Lisamarie posted recently.

Thanks for any info on this.
When I started tramping, I didn't mess around. I went straight to two of the Canadian national coaches and learned from the ground up (so to speak). They train top gymnasts, freestyle aerialists, mogul competitors, newschool skiers, wakeboarders and snowboarders. It's a very cool environment.

Primarily they use Rebound Products for their six main tramps.

I've fooled around a little on the "home" products but it's really not the same. The energy and feedback just isn't there, and they break down too quickly.

Check out the web page above. The cost can range from $1K - $5K, depending on what you're looking for.
post #17 of 19
Thanks. Any resources for training / excercise ideas short of a coach? (I.e., books, videos, websites, etc.) I have easy access to a full-size back-yard tramp, so it's not a question of equipment, just what to do with it.
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally posted by suebrown:
BigE, if you're looking for a way to use your old skis and bindings, this may be just the ticket!
WOW! Thanks so much for the link, it's in my favourites now....

Cheers!
post #19 of 19
Sometimes the simple things are just as good, walking up and down steep hills has always been effective for me. Biking up hill is also good. I think the hill climbing really helps from an endurance perspective, which comes in handy with 4000 ft vertical runs.
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