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new skis for 2016

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

So, Live in Colorado Springs and do the Epic Local every year. Had a pair of AC 50's past 7 years or so. Kind of a one trick pony in that I can take them mach 2 on the front side if its just a touch soft, get skittish on real hardpack and are just to me to stiff for crud and fresh snow. Have a pair of the Rossi S7's (2012) that I have skied past 2 seasons. Love them to death in fresh snow or even like today at A Basin. Classic spring day-no new snow but bluebird and by 10-11 am snow was pretty soft and could really roll an edge and crank. My only complaint on the S7's is they are so light and surfey that I get bounced around a bit a couple of hours after all the fresh snow(deep) has been skied off.

Ready to retire the AC 50's looking for a second ski to compliment the S7's. I am 56, 220lbs 5,10 ski everything but steep bumps been skiing for years. I have been reading the reviews on here for the Bonifides, stormriders ect...thoughts

Mike

post #2 of 7

I'm about your size, and your age. Life long skier, with a pretty extensive background. I ski about 60-70 days a winter, half in CO and half in the East. My go-to ski in CO is a 187cm Bonafide. Now, I also have a 184cm Firearrow EDT that I use when the snow's pretty old, and firm. The Bonafide could handle that just fine, but mid-week, open spaces, the FA is a blast. I wouldn't ski the FA in bumps, in trees, or in 6-8" of fresh snow. I'd pull the Bonafide in any of those conditions, and be smiling. I find the ski to be incredibly versatile. Can be worked into a variety of turn shapes, can be tipped on edge to use the full length and carve big turns,can smear turns…..the works. And they are readily available for a decent price. If I were looking for a ski with more hard snow, or "old snow" bias, I'd also give the Brahma a look. I've owned and skied both. For my group of skis, there's too much overlap to own both. I also have real hard snow skis both East and West. But, having said that, I think it's a super versatile ski as well. Kastle makes a great product, as does Stockli. In the eyes of many they're worth every dime of the price. The Stormrider 95 is a really nice ski that does a ton of things well. My next ski purchase may well be a Head Monster, and maybe an 88. It's the same width as the Brahma, but a very different ski, so I won't have that overlap with the Bonafide. I'll use it as a softer snow ripper in the East, if I go that route. I highly endorse the Bonafide for where you ski. Others will have more specific experience on Kastle and others. 

 

BTW, incredible deal on a pair of NEW Head Rev 85's in the gear forum. $299 with the PRD 12 binding. I've resisted that urge. It's a VERY nice ski, and a real Swiss Army Knife…..does a lot of things. I'm also selling a pair of mint 187cm Brahma's, listed there…..full disclosure!

post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 

Mule, Thanks for the reply. I could see this turning into a 3 ski quiver in a heartbeat. Would like to avoid if I can. Thing is I can really roll up the Rossi's if the snow is soft at all. Just cant get that speed the AC 50's have. I usually head up to summit county on a Tues/Thurs but its tough to get my schedule and fresh snow to line up. Might look at a dedicated carver/rock ski for hard days/early season used and spend the cash on something 90-95 underfoot to fill the gap. Had such a bluebird day today at the Basin really pissed that the season is coming to an end 

post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muleski View Post Head Monster, and maybe an 88. It's the same width as the Brahma, but a very different ski,

 

@Muleski, could you elaborate on the differences between the M88 and Brahma?  I'm very interested to hear your thoughts.  I have a 67mm ice carver, and a 105mm soft snow ski, am looking for something in the middle, and those 2 are on my shortlist.  Many thanks.

post #5 of 7

GunnerBob, here's my $.02. 

 

I skied the Monster 88 for two days late this winter. The snow was not new, and what we'd consider a bit firm for the Rockies. What we'd call packed powder in East, with an accent on the packed. Not Eastern firm. The skis had been perfectly ground and set up with 1/3 bevels. The mounting point was 1cm ahead of suggested. I was skiing pretty fast, and on open trails with some variable terrain. No bumps. Rarely a bump guy, and didn't care to ski old, badly formed bumps. I did find a little bit of leftover fresh snow in some wide open trees. 

 

I've mentioned that I consider the strength of the Brahma to be that it's versatile. I don't think that it's as "stiff" as others describe it to be; I can bend it as needed. I find it easy to ski in tight spaces and the occasional bumps, even in the 187cm. The flip core design and the rocker makes it pretty easy to work into all sorts of turn shapes, easy to skid, smear, "slarve", so easy to handle all sorts of stuff.  The tail releases you from a turn pretty easily. Like so many of today's skis, they work better if you ski centered, and if you ski well. It's a fairly damp ski, and it can be skied pretty fast with confidence. It' an all-rounder for a good skier. It's actually, for me, just fine in 6-8" of fresh snow, too. Now, I feel the Bonafide to be very much the same, and for whatever reason I just reach for it more often. Like them both. Based on where I ski, the days when I would pick one versus the other have tended to be Bonafide days. Having said that, based on my experience, I think in Ontario, you might want an 88mm waisted ski, the OP in CO a 98mm.

 

The Monster just feels super damp, super smooth, both exceptionally calm and quiet. I immediately felt serious hard snow edge grip {not that the Brahma doesn't grip well….it does} when I was looking for it. I found them really easy for me to initiate my turns, and get them up on edge. I'm guessing that a lot of work went into the tip design and layup. I prefer feeling the tips engage quickly, and consistently. I tend to ski on the front of my boot, and don't get caught much in the back seat. My response was that these were a kinder version of the old Monsters. My brother and I switched skis for a few runs. He was on his MX-88's. The MX-88 is a great ski, but it's a lot of ski. The sizes are wrong for me, too. The 188cm is more than I want in that ski, the 178cm not enough. We both felt that the Monster felt like less work, {if that makes sense} but delivered the same type of performance. Maybe a touch more forgiving, and easier to both get into a turn, and release. It still seems to want some speed before coming alive. That's fine with me. The Brahma does as well. But the Monster has the feeling of a ski with a just a tiny bit of early rise, and then conventional camber all the way through the tail. It just feels super solid to me. 

 

If I buy the Monster, I'm NOT looking for huge versatility, other than in the snow surface a bit. I'll still have the Bonafides for that. I tend to ski open spaces, and big, long wide open cruisers back in the East. I tend to make pretty big turns. I don't spend much time in the bumps, and in the East, I wouldn't ski these in the trees other than in spots that are really opened up, when the snow's not real deep. I ski pretty fast, and like to have a solid and predictable platform under me. I like to tip the ski up on edge, and feel the edge engage. The Monster felt to me to be a really great ski for that kind of skiing. It probably gives up some of the Brahma's versatility, and improves on the real damp, calm, powerful skiing, and edge grip for an 88mm ski. I didn't experience it much, but my hunch is that the ski would be fine in fresh snow, and really great in some chunked up, skied-out stuff. I think that the big differences for me were in the amount of tip rocker, the tip lay-up and dimensions,and the lack of any tail rocker {or none apparent to me}. I like the way it carved, the way the tip engages, and the damp classic Head feel…despite the new technology. My wife skis the new Head Super Joy, and loves it. I "guess" that the new Monster has some Graphene in it, but it didn't feel light to me at all. 

 

As I said, I think it's all personal preference, and really slight degrees of difference. There are SO many good skis out there, and these are two of them. I'm certain that demoing the two skis for a decent amount of time would make the differences and your preferences clear. It really is about feel and touch, and in the case of the Monster 88, I just really liked the way it skied for me. Powerful, smooth, yet fun. It was one of those "Boy, I REALLY like that ski" moments….like when I first skied most of my skis. 

 

I, too, would like to hear from anybody who's had a chance to spend more than a day or two on the Monster. The layup, as I understand it, is the exact same regardless of the width. So I think input from any of them would be interesting. Thanks. 

post #6 of 7
I'm between the Monster 88 and the Motive 86 for a new purchase. Maybe even the Motive 95.
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by colospgsmike View Post
 

So, Live in Colorado Springs and do the Epic Local every year. Had a pair of AC 50's past 7 years or so. Kind of a one trick pony in that I can take them mach 2 on the front side if its just a touch soft, get skittish on real hardpack and are just to me to stiff for crud and fresh snow. Have a pair of the Rossi S7's (2012) that I have skied past 2 seasons. Love them to death in fresh snow or even like today at A Basin. Classic spring day-no new snow but bluebird and by 10-11 am snow was pretty soft and could really roll an edge and crank. My only complaint on the S7's is they are so light and surfey that I get bounced around a bit a couple of hours after all the fresh snow(deep) has been skied off.

Ready to retire the AC 50's looking for a second ski to compliment the S7's. I am 56, 220lbs 5,10 ski everything but steep bumps been skiing for years. I have been reading the reviews on here for the Bonifides, stormriders ect...thoughts

Mike

 

If you get the Bonafides I forsee you selling the S7s or forgetting them.  An AC50 replacement would be more of an Experience, or maybe NRGy.  more versatile than the old Volkls.

 

With the S7 bounce factor, tip those babies and slice through the crud, but those tips are soft and they can only handle so much.  The Bones can replace both the S7 and AC50.

 

Pretty much every ski out these days is a great design.  Two year old models go for a pittance and last year can be had for a song.

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