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RAVE: ski conditioning workouts work!

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
Last year I realized that I needed a higher level of fitness in order to see my skiing progress further.

In April, I went to the gym and started working out with a personal trainer. Eleven weeks later, I continued on my own. In September, I purchased some more personal training.

The first round of training was needed to bring me to an overall level of fitness so that I could then begin a true "ski conditioning" program in September.

Each week I average:
- 3-4 spinning classes (this gives me great cardio, endurance, and some muscle conditioning)
- 3 ski conditioning workouts (about an hour of exercises that strengthen my core, improve balance and "explosiveness", and some weight training for my upper and lower body
- I do a nice stretch after warming up and again at the end of each workout

I went skiing the other day. I did about 15 top to bottom runs. My legs did not get tired, nor did my muscles burn. It did take a few runs to stop catching edges, etc. Once I got into the groove of it all I had a HUGE BREAKTHROUGH. I finally felt the sensation of "rebounding" in my carved turns and was able to use my body as one unit, instead of feeling all of the separate pieces. You couldn't beat the smile off of my face.

No matter your ability - spend some time doing all the things Lisamarie and Pierre preach here. It's SOOOOO worth it!! [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

kiersten
post #2 of 24
So cool! But I'm laughing at your minor but understandable slip up! Its Frenchie who also posts fitness ideas!
post #3 of 24
Thread Starter 
WHOOPS! [img]redface.gif[/img] You are correct... my bad. I owe Frenchie "une bierre".

kiersten
post #4 of 24
Goddamnit. I was hoping this was a guide to using raves as ski cross training. Oh well, congrats on yor breakthrough! I did similar things in around February this year in preperation for out ski season (june-october) and noticed MASSIVE differences as well.
post #5 of 24
Thread Starter 
oh sure OZ... lemme me dig out that email I have..

Epic Ski Academy at Ibiza!!!

LOL
post #6 of 24
[img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img] : [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img] [img]graemlins/angel.gif[/img]

Sounds good to me!

By the way, THE best song I have ever HEARD to ski to is DJ Tiesto remix of a song called Silence by Delerium. If anyones interested, grab a copy and let me know what you think.
post #7 of 24
Thanks Kieli and LM for correcting it. Hope that you will keep a maintenance program for the ski season. If you ski every weekend and you ski hard, you can reduce your strength workout to twice a week and your cardio to three a week. This should help you recover from your weekends as your body will need more rest. If you ski less often or don't ski very hard physically, keep the same regimen. Thanks for the inputs. Congratulation for the great work [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

[ November 24, 2003, 12:52 AM: Message edited by: Frenchie ]
post #8 of 24
Quote:
Originally posted by kieli:
Last year I realized that I needed a higher level of fitness in order to see my skiing progress further.

In April, I went to the gym and started working out with a personal trainer. Eleven weeks later, I continued on my own. In September, I purchased some more personal training.

The first round of training was needed to bring me to an overall level of fitness so that I could then begin a true "ski conditioning" program in September.

Each week I average:
- 3-4 spinning classes (this gives me great cardio, endurance, and some muscle conditioning)
- 3 ski conditioning workouts (about an hour of exercises that strengthen my core, improve balance and "explosiveness", and some weight training for my upper and lower body
- I do a nice stretch after warming up and again at the end of each workout

I went skiing the other day. I did about 15 top to bottom runs. My legs did not get tired, nor did my muscles burn. It did take a few runs to stop catching edges, etc. Once I got into the groove of it all I had a HUGE BREAKTHROUGH. I finally felt the sensation of "rebounding" in my carved turns and was able to use my body as one unit, instead of feeling all of the separate pieces. You couldn't beat the smile off of my face.

No matter your ability - spend some time doing all the things Lisamarie and Pierre preach here. It's SOOOOO worth it!! [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

kiersten
Kiersten Congrats,

I am glad to hear your story. It gives me some hope for my self. I was able to make significant gains in my form and skills last season, but I had felt that my conditioning, or lack was holding me back in more challenging conditions. I started a similar program this spring as well. I did mostly trail running over the summer 2-3 times per week. And combined this with various leg, trunk, and balance exercises through out the fall. I also started walking 2-3 miles per day since I moved to the city and gave up my car. Hopefully this season will be a break through for me as well. I cannot wait to get out and see how I do.

You mention strenghtening your "core". What is this? I assume trunk and Legs right?
post #9 of 24
Hi TBONE!

Actually, the word "core" has many definitions. But most people are referring to the deeper abdominal muscles, such as the transverse, pelvic floor and multifidus.

These are not the muscles that get activated during traditional crunches, which work the superficial abdominal muscles.

The core stabilizers are responsible for balance and postural alignment. There are tons and tons of topics in this forum. Go to the top of this page, use the setting 'view all topics'.
Have fun!
post #10 of 24
I have a question, Lisa and Frenchie. If a person lives a self-sufficient lifestyle, i.e., a nonurban, nonconsumer, not-sitting lifestyle, and the daily grind consists of hauling water, chopping firewood, and slopping pigs (for instance), do they need to join a gym and do pre-ski conditioning, or are they already in shape by virtue of their "third-world" lifestyle?

The reason I ask is I live 100 miles from the gym, the personal trainer, etc., and would have to improvise to be in conventional shape, yet despite my disadvantages, I never seem to have ill-effects from skiing, even the very first day (which I haven't enjoyed yet).

Not wanting to be a pain, but merely to point out that gyms may be superfluous if your lifestyle is active and occasions you to bear frequent variable loads.
post #11 of 24
Some of us office workers in the city need to train hard if we want to have a strong core.

Sitting in a chair and getting up to go to the bathroom are not good exercises.

[img]smile.gif[/img]

Personally I am rehabbing so I need to workout 2-3 times a week anyway but I felt the benefits when skiing the other weekend because my legs and core are extremely strong.

For me at least
post #12 of 24
That's the point. If we got more exercise out of our lifestyles we wouldn't have to schedule workouts. It's sort of like the difference between the city dog and the ranch dog. I don't take my ranch dog out for exercise.

It's just a thought. I went to a clinic by a sports trainer and he told us if we were living two hundred years ago or in a Third World country we wouldn't have to worry about going to the gym or keeping our diet.
post #13 of 24
I can get into big trouble by typing this at the gym's computer, but Nolo is correct. Has anyone ever seen the clip of Janica Kostelic's training regimen? No gym. Not even that much snow. She walks on fences, runs cross country, etc. Can't argue with her sucess.

Much to the dismay of equipment manufacturers, fitness is becoming more and more low tech. You can set up an entire home fitness center with a ball, a bosu, a dyna disc, a foam roller, and some resistance bands.

Much of what we do in the gym for ski fitness for city people involves setting up "unpredictable' environments, which attempt to resemble the non urban settings you describe.
post #14 of 24
I'm exhausted just reading about these exercise regimens. I'm going to have another glass of wine and then take a nap.



[ November 26, 2003, 02:51 AM: Message edited by: BillA ]
post #15 of 24
Nolo,

I agree with LM and you, the gym is not always necessary. I grew up on a piece of land where farming and tree loggin are the main activities. Kids that grow up in those conditions usually develop pretty good stength and coordination compare to the average.

I would just like to add that for those who live in a urban setting, the gym is a time efficient and less dangerous way of getting in shape. Advantage of the gym is that it is easier to monitor load progression than in a working environment and in many case to be more specific about a given task.

However, it is still hard to recreate in a gym setting and time restrain, the various angles, speed of motion, positions and the coordination acquired during hours of rural labor tasks.
post #16 of 24
I read a news release a while back from the national osteoporosis foundation that touted skiing as an especially good sport for women because it calls for the skeleton to bear uneven loads, which is critical to strengthening bone.

Just wondering, would you characterize the work of a skier as a "variable load-bearing activity"?
post #17 of 24
Absolutely, unequivicably yes! Newer studies are finding that "unpredictable" weight bearing does a better job of preventing ostoeporosis than predictable weight bearing such as working on a leg extension or holding a yoga pose.
The problem is, most people do not have the time or money to put in enough skier days to make it worthwhile, which is why the program Kirsten is using is so effective.
post #18 of 24
BTW, how do people work on "explosiveness"? Is it lighter weights and more reps? I mean, if I do 200-lb leg presses 58 per minute, does it build up my explosiveness, or does it just tire my joints? [img]tongue.gif[/img] Or am I substituting the "explosiveness" term for "stamina", and ability to lift a huge weight quickly - like the weightlifters do - for ability to lift a "normal" weight a lot of times? I am confused.

Also, how do you isolate the fast-twitch muscles?
post #19 of 24
If you could only do two or three excercises over time to prep for ski season... what would they be?
post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally posted by AlexG:
BTW, how do people work on "explosiveness"? Is it lighter weights and more reps? I mean, if I do 200-lb leg presses 58 per minute, does it build up my explosiveness, or does it just tire my joints? [img]tongue.gif[/img] Or am I substituting the "explosiveness" term for "stamina", and ability to lift a huge weight quickly - like the weightlifters do - for ability to lift a "normal" weight a lot of times? I am confused.

Also, how do you isolate the fast-twitch muscles?
Alex, for explosiveness, you want to do plyometrics. The best sequence is the National Academy of Medicine's Integrated Training protocol. Do a set of leg presses. Follow it with a jumping activity. For fast twitch fibers, perform interval training. Start your cardio at a moderate pace, then do 2-5 minute intervals at maximum effort. There was a recent post on this somewhere in this forum.

Gregbo, doing only 3 exercises would not prepare you for anything.
post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally posted by Lisamarie:
You can set up an entire home fitness center with a ball, a bosu, a dyna disc, a foam roller, and some resistance bands.
What is the functional difference between a Bosu and a Dyna Disc? I started using Dyna Discs about a month ago and have never come across a Bosu outside discussion here. When I started using the Dyna I thought that it may be a good approximation of the Bosu. Is it?

Aar
post #22 of 24
Check out http://www.bosu.com and look at the pics. The bosu is bigger, so its more versatile.
Bosu is like mogul skiing, dyna disc is like crud skiing. The disc is more economical. There are some exercises that can be done on both pieces of equipment.
post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally posted by Lisamarie:
Alex, for explosiveness, you want to do plyometrics. The best sequence is the National Academy of Medicine's Integrated Training protocol. Do a set of leg presses. Follow it with a jumping activity. For fast twitch fibers, perform interval training. Start your cardio at a moderate pace, then do 2-5 minute intervals at maximum effort. There was a recent post on this somewhere in this forum.
Thanks, Lisamarie. I will try this interval training thingamagiggar. BTW, speaking about leg presses. If I do 15 reps of 360 lbs at normal pace and then 200 lbs at maximum number of reps per minute over one minute and then back to the heavy weight - does that qualify as interval training? I am trying to find the optimal mode for exercise without overworking the heart : , so I can avoid the high blood pressure lingering for half the day after the couple of hours in the gym.

Also, how do you strengthen the back section of the deltoids (deltoid posterior ?) ?

[ December 02, 2003, 11:54 AM: Message edited by: AlexG ]
post #24 of 24
Thread Starter 
wow - sorry to not have kept up with this post.

Nolo - I envy your lifestyle and your ability to not have to deal with the gym. I live IN Boston and this is what I have to do... because cimbing stairs, carrying my laundry to the basement, walking the city streets, etc is not enough.

My latest torture at the gym... (an excerpt)

circuit (do 3 sets)
- 60 lb squats on a machine (12 reps)

- squats on bosu with 6lb medicine ball (12 reps)
hold ball over head, squat and touch one foot with ball, stand up and raise ball diagonally and squat down touching it to the other foot, continue)

- walking lunges with 6lbs medicine ball (8 on each leg)
holding ball in front of body, lunge down, twist to open hip (with ball), return to front, step up and lunge forward

- walking 45 degree lunges with 6lbs medicine ball (8 on each leg)
holding ball in front of body, lunge to right at 45 degree angle reach down and touch ball to ground, step up and lunge to left at 45 degree angle and touch ball to groun, repeat

that circuit KILLS me. and I was so sore the first time. I have also gotten my spinning durations to 45-80 minutes at any given time.

I skied TERRIBLE conditions this past weekend - all bumps, too... and my legs were FINE. YIPPEE.

kiersten
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