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Pie - Page 2

post #31 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

Strawberry rhubarb


Mmm-mmmm.  Have to start working on my wife — she's great with pies, too.

post #32 of 55
That looks good. So, any recipes?
Question. Does your wife use leaf lard and butter for the crust?
Quote:
Originally Posted by JJQIV View Post

o.jpg

The Pear and Gorgonzola Pizza Pie from Squaw Valley's Fireside Pizza Co is wonderfully decadent!
Everything tha's wrong with California right there.^^
post #33 of 55

What is leaf lard?

post #34 of 55

Pie PSA

 

St Maries, MT;  The Park Cafe, perhaps the best pie on the planet, ever. You will pay, and do so gladly. 

 

A word of warning, do not be a jerk. David Letterman (his ranch is in the area) was a jerk, and has been banned. No pie for Dave.

 

My favorite pie there; ALL OF IT.

post #35 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post

What is leaf lard?
It's the fat from around the kidney of a pig. You can buy it already rendered or boil chunks then strain and pour into like an ice cube tray. It's very white. Many feel lard gives a much better texture to crusts. I think it's also supposed to roll out better without cracking. You still want some butter for taste. I'm no pastry chef but I researched it once when making a pie. Recipe was from the White House chef.
post #36 of 55
My wife uses all butter, part cake flour, and a little sour cream to help keep the crust light and flaky.
post #37 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger View Post

Pie PSA

St Maries, MT;  The Park Cafe, perhaps the best pie on the planet, ever. You will pay, and do so gladly. 

A word of warning, do not be a jerk. David Letterman (his ranch is in the area) was a jerk, and has been banned. No pie for Dave.

My favorite pie there; ALL OF IT.
What did Dave do?
You realize the Ed Sullivan Theater where Dave's show was is very near the old soup nazi guy?

I will add that the Mountain Creamery in Woodstock, VT has some of the best pie crust I ever had. That on their "Mt High" apple pie which is absurdly thick. I seriously had friends asking for more crust. It looks like nothing too. I'm not sure the filling is quite up to the crust but overall excellent. ( In comparison, the VT Pie Co. apple pie sucked)

Another.... if you're ever in Grand Central Terminal in Nyc, ( the railroad, and it's not " Station") go lower level and visit The Little Pie Shop. Delicious small pies. I honestly don't know if they'r still there though.
post #38 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post

What is leaf lard?
It's the fat from around the kidney of a pig. You can buy it already rendered or boil chunks then strain and pour into like an ice cube tray. It's very white. Many feel lard gives a much better texture to crusts. I think it's also supposed to roll out better without cracking. You still want some butter for taste. I'm no pastry chef but I researched it once when making a pie. Recipe was from the White House chef.

 

I'd heard of lard, but not leaf lard. I don't make pies (haven't made pies yet?), but I use bacon fat for corn bread, and can only report good things.

post #39 of 55
Well bacon is universally good. Not sure about it's use in sweet pies though.
You can probably buy leaf lard at a fancy food shop already rendered. Or go to the butcher shop and ask then render it at home. Essentially you're just melting it then straining. I think it's better if they grind it for you for rendering.

I admit being horrified at first about lard. But...
Quote:
But recent studies differentiating between saturated and unsaturated fats put lard in a better light, particularly as the emphasis has shifted away from avoiding fat altogether to choosing the type of fat carefully. According to the Agriculture Department Nutrition Database, lard is composed of 42 percent saturated fat (which may increase cholesterol levels in the blood) and 54 percent unsaturated fat (which may decrease cholesterol in the blood). By comparison, butter is 43 percent saturated fat and 30 percent unsaturated, while olive oil is 14 percent saturated and 83 percent unsaturated fat.

While most nutritionists continue to reflexively discourage regular use of lard, not everyone agrees.

''Lard's not a big deal,'' said Dr. John M. Dietschy, who conducts studies of cholesterol metabolism as director of the department of gastroenterology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas. ''The real danger in the human diet is in total calories consumed. All oils are extremely rich, about nine calories per gram.''
Light, Fluffy: Believe It, It's Not Butter
http://www.nytimes.com/2000/10/11/dining/light-fluffy-believe-it-it-s-not-butter.html
post #40 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

Well bacon is universally good. Not sure about it's use in sweet pies though.
You can probably buy leaf lard at a fancy food shop already rendered. Or go to the butcher shop and ask then render it at home. Essentially you're just melting it then straining. I think it's better if they grind it for you for rendering.

I admit being horrified at first about lard. But...
Quote:
But recent studies differentiating between saturated and unsaturated fats put lard in a better light, particularly as the emphasis has shifted away from avoiding fat altogether to choosing the type of fat carefully. According to the Agriculture Department Nutrition Database, lard is composed of 42 percent saturated fat (which may increase cholesterol levels in the blood) and 54 percent unsaturated fat (which may decrease cholesterol in the blood). By comparison, butter is 43 percent saturated fat and 30 percent unsaturated, while olive oil is 14 percent saturated and 83 percent unsaturated fat.

While most nutritionists continue to reflexively discourage regular use of lard, not everyone agrees.

''Lard's not a big deal,'' said Dr. John M. Dietschy, who conducts studies of cholesterol metabolism as director of the department of gastroenterology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas. ''The real danger in the human diet is in total calories consumed. All oils are extremely rich, about nine calories per gram.''
Light, Fluffy: Believe It, It's Not Butter
http://www.nytimes.com/2000/10/11/dining/light-fluffy-believe-it-it-s-not-butter.html

 

Based on my personal experience - my cholesterol levels shot to "awesome" from merely "fine" when I was eating lots of saturated fat, but also eating tons of vegetables and salads. My takeaway: it's about proportions more than absolute amounts. If you eat lots of vegetables, you can make up for a lot of sins.

post #41 of 55
Thread Starter 
Fresh strawberry pie. (Blind-baked shell, whole uncooked strawberries in shell, hot strawberry filling poured over, then chilled to set.)

post #42 of 55
Thread Starter 

Plus I rode 60mi with 3,700' elevation gain this afternoon, so I can have as much of this as I want. :)

post #43 of 55
Thread Starter 
Raspberry peach with Angostura bitters.

post #44 of 55
Oohh... Was it as good as it looks?
post #45 of 55
Thread Starter 
Mais bien sûr!
post #46 of 55
J'ai pris une tarte fromage aux fraise à Cochon Dingue à Québec ce soir. Ce n'était pas fait maison, mais c'était bonne.
post #47 of 55
J'aime tarte.
post #48 of 55

If I dust off my 40 year old high school French, can I have a slice of pie?

post #49 of 55
After baking a delicious peach pie, my wife came across this too true image.

MostAccuratePieChart.jpg

Here is the latest beauty.

post #50 of 55

;)

 

With peaches in season here, I should probably make a peach pie.  I haven't had one of those in a long time. 

post #51 of 55
post #52 of 55

This thread is going to undo all my workouts to date.

post #53 of 55
I feel your pain! That was actually the first of two peach pies, one for my father while visiting then the next week for my daughter and her boyfriend while at the beach. Had to ride a bike everyday to burn off the pie and beer!
post #54 of 55

I'll throw in a vote for my wife's wild blueberry and nectarine shortbread. To have tasted it is to be able to die happy.

post #55 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by XLTL View Post

I feel your pain! That was actually the first of two peach pies, one for my father while visiting then the next week for my daughter and her boyfriend while at the beach. Had to ride a bike everyday to burn off the pie and beer!


I just got back from a long run and even though I had zero desire for food, I just asked my wife to bake the first pumpkin pie of the season...

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