or Connect
EpicSki › Groups › park skiers › Discussions › Lets breathe some new life into this group!

Lets breathe some new life into this group!

Poll Results: Is Park Skiing Important to Epicski?

 
  • 100% (11)
    Yes
  • 0% (0)
    No
11 Total Votes  
post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

So I realized that this group has been inactive for a couple of years.  I think it is time we breathe some new life into it.  There is so much that has happened to the sport since this group was created.  We had our Olympic debut and Americans absolutely dominated the competition!  The standard for tricks in the park has progressed to a level most of us could never have imagined possible.  So let us all take a brief moment to appreciate the legitimacy that has finally come to a discipline that was disregarded by so much of the community for so long. 

 

Now, I think this group should have at least 10 active threads.  Gear talk, trick tips, videos, and news are just a handful of discussions worth having.  What do you guys think?  Is there even enough interest in these subjects on this site?  Although the group is called "Park Skiers" I think the conversation should extend to all things freestyle, including halfpipe, big mountain, and moguls.  We can also include an instruction component for those wanting to teach in the park or become Freestyle Specialists through PSIA.  Let me know your thoughts and if you feel compelled, go ahead and start a thread!

post #2 of 17

It worked.  I wasn't even aware this group existed until now. Might be helpful to make it clear that anyone can click the "Park Skiers" group link in the breadcrumbs above and join the group to post here and vote in the poll.  That said, of your answer is "no" than you probably won't bother to join the group and vote so I predict an avalanche of "yes" votes and zero "no" votes.  Perhaps this poll belongs in general skiing instead of down in the group forum area.

post #3 of 17

Glad you energized this.  

Lets get this party started!!

post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post
 

Glad you energized this.  

Lets get this party started!!

 

Nice one Phil!  Classic day at the Basin!!

post #5 of 17

I think there is value for any skier to hop into a park just to enhance their own skiing skills. Going down a narrow half pipe can help someone get over their fears of going down a narrow chute in a more controlled fashion. Popping off the tiniest jump helps a skier learn how to properly absorb a landing while having a controlled, safe environment where the outrun isn't covered with moguls.

 

Jonny Moseley, gold medalist in moguls at the 1998 Nagano Olympics, attributed some of his success to ballet skiing. Learning to use your edges and balance in all directions has a positive aspect in all areas of skiing. I skied with a few different instructors this year and they all commented on my balance and how I got out of predicaments that may have sent other accomplished skiers into a tumble. Even 25+ years after doing any ballet, luckily those skills stayed with me. Although, I took a few fun tumbles nevertheless. :)

post #6 of 17

Definitely will add a needed adrenaline boost on those blah days.

 

Looking forward to post with pics, vids, instructions, stories .....

post #7 of 17

I've been meaning to go into the park more often but find myself getting distracted.  I really like to drop small to mid-sized cliffs (10-15 feet) and find natural kickers around the mountain, so one of my goals for next season is to introduce a little freestyle instead of the standard hands to your knees tuck and huck.

 

Where's the best place to start?  With a shifty, then maybe a grab, and work my way up to a 3?  I can do a small 3 - say when boosting off a cat track - but haven't ever tried one of any real substantial size.

post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post
 

I've been meaning to go into the park more often but find myself getting distracted.  I really like to drop small to mid-sized cliffs (10-15 feet) and find natural kickers around the mountain, so one of my goals for next season is to introduce a little freestyle instead of the standard hands to your knees tuck and huck.

 

Where's the best place to start?  With a shifty, then maybe a grab, and work my way up to a 3?  I can do a small 3 - say when boosting off a cat track - but haven't ever tried one of any real substantial size.

 

The park is a great place to go when the skiing on the rest of the mountain is blase.  Perhaps your favorite steeps are thin and icy.  Maybe the bumps are frozen solid.  Most terrain parks are meticulously groomed and maintained throughout the day.  Even when the weather doesn't fully cooperate, the terrain park offers tons of options within itself.  Headwinds and low visibility can make jumping treacherous.  On these particular days, rails and boxes are much more accessible features.  And at the beginning and end of each season when terrain is very limited, the terrain park offers a place where you can hangout all day and never get bored. 

 

Regarding big mountain and natural features, the terrain park is a perfect controlled environment to develop the necessary skills.  I think the progression you outlined is pretty spot on.  That is exactly what I teach to my students when they are beginning to introduce more style into their airs.  The only other maneuvers I would suggest as part of that progression are things like spreaders, daffys, and back scratchers, which all require independent movement of your legs and skis; super important skill when you eventually want to cross your skis during different grabs like mute or tail, or "kick" a ski when you do a lui kang or japan grab.  

 

360s are an interesting subject.  They are so unbelievably easy but they tend to present a huge challenge for a lot of people.  3s off cat tracks are a perfect place to start.  Cat tracks usually offer enough air without a whole lot of upward trajectory on takeoff.  This makes it easier to stay on-axis and it can be very representative of the sensation of doing one off a cliff.  In time you will find that doing any trick on larger features is much, much easier.  Air is your friend.  That being said, it is a lot scarier.  With enough mileage, however, you eventually develop the confidence to go bigger and bigger.  Soon airs that you used to think were big start to feel much smaller.  The first time you hit a 50ft jump it is terrifying.  Even the first 10 times can be pretty scary.  But the more you do it successfully, the more your brain begins to relax.  You start focusing a lot less on pure survival and you can begin to focus on the subtleties of your maneuver, whether it is a grab, a spin, or a flip.  Hope that helps!     

post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by HippieFlippinNM View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post
 

I've been meaning to go into the park more often but find myself getting distracted.  I really like to drop small to mid-sized cliffs (10-15 feet) and find natural kickers around the mountain, so one of my goals for next season is to introduce a little freestyle instead of the standard hands to your knees tuck and huck.

 

Where's the best place to start?  With a shifty, then maybe a grab, and work my way up to a 3?  I can do a small 3 - say when boosting off a cat track - but haven't ever tried one of any real substantial size.

 

The park is a great place to go when the skiing on the rest of the mountain is blase.  Perhaps your favorite steeps are thin and icy.  Maybe the bumps are frozen solid.  Most terrain parks are meticulously groomed and maintained throughout the day.  Even when the weather doesn't fully cooperate, the terrain park offers tons of options within itself.  Headwinds and low visibility can make jumping treacherous.  On these particular days, rails and boxes are much more accessible features.  And at the beginning and end of each season when terrain is very limited, the terrain park offers a place where you can hangout all day and never get bored. 

 

Regarding big mountain and natural features, the terrain park is a perfect controlled environment to develop the necessary skills.  I think the progression you outlined is pretty spot on.  That is exactly what I teach to my students when they are beginning to introduce more style into their airs.  The only other maneuvers I would suggest as part of that progression are things like spreaders, daffys, and back scratchers, which all require independent movement of your legs and skis; super important skill when you eventually want to cross your skis during different grabs like mute or tail, or "kick" a ski when you do a lui kang or japan grab.  

 

360s are an interesting subject.  They are so unbelievably easy but they tend to present a huge challenge for a lot of people.  3s off cat tracks are a perfect place to start.  Cat tracks usually offer enough air without a whole lot of upward trajectory on takeoff.  This makes it easier to stay on-axis and it can be very representative of the sensation of doing one off a cliff.  In time you will find that doing any trick on larger features is much, much easier.  Air is your friend.  That being said, it is a lot scarier.  With enough mileage, however, you eventually develop the confidence to go bigger and bigger.  Soon airs that you used to think were big start to feel much smaller.  The first time you hit a 50ft jump it is terrifying.  Even the first 10 times can be pretty scary.  But the more you do it successfully, the more your brain begins to relax.  You start focusing a lot less on pure survival and you can begin to focus on the subtleties of your maneuver, whether it is a grab, a spin, or a flip.  Hope that helps!     

So easy a 50 year old can do them. :D

post #10 of 17

I generally do not spend much time in the park on my own. But I did teach 1/2 dozen park lessons last season. Go figure. I'm still working on the Joey slide on the rails (as in Hey Joey! Watch this! - it's an inside joke).

post #11 of 17
OK. I joined. So I am a step closer to learning how to Huck?
post #12 of 17

how could anyone turn down a guy who plays the ukulele? I joined but only in the hope that next season, Hippie Flippin does an intro to the park for geriatric skiers like me. ;)

post #13 of 17

Thanks for the invite to join, however at 73yr my Air days are long gone.

 

 

par.JPG

 

 

But still love to ski.

post #14 of 17


Lets put the free back in freestyle. 

post #15 of 17

^^ Relevant article: Who killed freeride skiing? Geoff Stump

 

http://stumpfilms.com/?p=654

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by rx2ski View Post
 

^^ Relevant article: Who killed freeride skiing? Geoff Stump

 

http://stumpfilms.com/?p=654


@Stumpa  posted this article/video 

http://www.epicski.com/a/face-the-pipe-stumpfilms

 

I would love to get Stumpa involved in breathing new life back into the sport. 

post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 


Lets put the free back in freestyle. 

 

These guys are working on it! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Return Home
  Back to Forum: park skiers
EpicSki › Groups › park skiers › Discussions › Lets breathe some new life into this group!