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Upgrade my wheelset? - Page 2

post #31 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by MT Skull View Post

Seems like it's a combo of a wider rim (than what I've been riding) and a little less pressure (110 psi instead of 120). I went with 23 width, but imagine 25 would be plush enough to make 28 seem kind of like overkill.

Thanks! 28's were stock on my bike and I do like thr ride and feel but I think going to tubeless and dropping to 25 would save enough weight to make it worth while. The wheel set is a Dt Swiss tubeless setup. Really not bad for stock. Now I just need to get my knee to allow me to ride. smile.gif
post #32 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post


Thanks! 28's were stock on my bike and I do like thr ride and feel but I think going to tubeless and dropping to 25 would save enough weight to make it worth while. The wheel set is a Dt Swiss tubeless setup. Really not bad for stock. Now I just need to get my knee to allow me to ride. smile.gif


My Hutchinson Secteur 28's weigh less than the Intensive 25's they replaced. I don't recall the exact numbers, but I did weigh them when I switched. I can run 70-80 psi (tubeless) and they are super comfortable and no slower than the 23's and 25's I used to run.

 

And to the OP, you really should check out the Specialized Diverge. It's real road geometry and the ability to run 35mm tires. Comes stock with 30/32's.

post #33 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RatherPlayThanWork View Post
 


My Hutchinson Secteur 28's weigh less than the Intensive 25's they replaced. I don't recall the exact numbers, but I did weigh them when I switched. I can run 70-80 psi (tubeless) and they are super comfortable and no slower than the 23's and 25's I used to run.

 

And to the OP, you really should check out the Specialized Diverge. It's real road geometry and the ability to run 35mm tires. Comes stock with 30/32's.

If I compare diverge with Crux, there is a 700$  difference for about the same quality compounds

post #34 of 44

 I think the Diverge Di2 with hydro disc is about $8k.  I would classify it as a very relaxed road geometry.  I think it's wheelbase it considerably longer than their Tarmac.  Maybe in the 25-28mm range. The bb drop is also longer.

post #35 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by RatherPlayThanWork View Post
 


My Hutchinson Secteur 28's weigh less than the Intensive 25's they replaced. I don't recall the exact numbers, but I did weigh them when I switched. I can run 70-80 psi (tubeless) and they are super comfortable and no slower than the 23's and 25's I used to run.

 

And to the OP, you really should check out the Specialized Diverge. It's real road geometry and the ability to run 35mm tires. Comes stock with 30/32's.

 

 

You  are correct! I went and looked up the "published" weights I like schwalbe's and the weight penalty is only 80 grams for the pair.  

post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogsie View Post
 

 Hey qcanoe! It was not a say but a question...And I think you're right! I just came from a ride on my tricross and really felt like it was really demanding... I then took my new Superfly 9.7 and did again the last part of the ride and it was so much easier that I don't understand anymore! How come my mountain bike can be easier and as efficient as my cyclocross on the road???I think you may have just given me part of the answer but there is definitly something wrong here...

 

Could it be that the geometry of the tricross is really not for me? I have quite a large frame so maybe a larger handlebar is better for me? I'm in the dark...

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mogsie View Post
 

It feels like I can get more power and efficiency from myself on the Superfly thant the Tricross...

I first tought that maybe I could just get a second set of wheels for the Superfly but I would also need new crankset and cassette... Also, I felt that even closed, the rear suspension made me loose a little power... So maybe I should look at bike like a crosstrail or a hardtail?

 

BTW, great stuff from your 1st link! It is a concentrate of infos...The kind of text that you have to read a couple of times... 

 

Comparing apples & oranges is always a exercise in frustration.  Your position on each bike is likely quite different. Different enough to make riding the bike you do the miles on, seeming much more 'efficient'. Same can be said for me, I go faster on my roadie than I do on my TT bike - BECAUSE I rarely ride the TT and the position is SOOO different than the roadie.

Position on an MTB is going to be quite different from a road or cross bike. Then there's the question of riding style (cadences used, gearing, technique for the up & down terrain you speak of).

Position will also have a major impact on posture; and position and posture dictate power (and efficiency, and the balance of both).

 

The wheel thing makes a difference - if you're always at or near your limits, if you're riding in groups which don't allow you to dictate your pace & style, if you have to keep up, if you're racing.

Wheel weight is VERY second to rider weight and fitness. Most factory machine built wheels can be improved greatly by first having a good wheel builder properly tune and tension the wheelset. This is usually the most economical way to go before dropping bucks on a wheelset which might be a real improvement. And based on your weight, a 25mm will certainly be more comfortable and more efficient than a 23. Even going to a 28 on the rear might be worth a try. Good tires make a difference - about the same as good wheels - and definitely easier on the wallet as a start.

IN the end, 'feeling' faster may or may not be accurate. Time yourself, on the same route, under same conditions, when you're feeling about the same. Make it at least a 45 min course. A short course will favor which ever you can 'power' thru. A longer course will always favor the most efficient ride.

Spend some time with experienced roadies who might be open to giving pointers on improving on road performance is always a good thing.

tuning the motor pays the biggest dividends.

post #37 of 44

It's very hard to talk gear with some people..and this isn't directed at anyone in this thread, we all seem pretty rational here.  That's why I like to say the "religious gear people".  :D  I look at my race times..gear in the performance sense isn't making any difference to me..a very little maybe.  Body position, aero position, general fitness, technique..all of these things are far greater at my level than any gear changes.  I mean, yeah, it can be said that deep rims are worth a second or whatever a kilometer...that's not my focus.  I suck..I'm mid-pack masters..fitness is my target.  It's like motorcycle racing..5hp isn't going to win you races when you're mid-pack..will it help?  Yeah..but..you have bigger fish to fry.  If you just want to get gear to feel new things and experience better gear, that's awesome and I get that.  I really try to focus people on bike fit, riding technique and durable gear that will let you pile on miles.

post #38 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by moreoutdoor View Post
 

 

 

 

Comparing apples & oranges is always a exercise in frustration.  Your position on each bike is likely quite different. Different enough to make riding the bike you do the miles on, seeming much more 'efficient'. Same can be said for me, I go faster on my roadie than I do on my TT bike - BECAUSE I rarely ride the TT and the position is SOOO different than the roadie.

Position on an MTB is going to be quite different from a road or cross bike. Then there's the question of riding style (cadences used, gearing, technique for the up & down terrain you speak of).

Position will also have a major impact on posture; and position and posture dictate power (and efficiency, and the balance of both).

 

The wheel thing makes a difference - if you're always at or near your limits, if you're riding in groups which don't allow you to dictate your pace & style, if you have to keep up, if you're racing.

Wheel weight is VERY second to rider weight and fitness. Most factory machine built wheels can be improved greatly by first having a good wheel builder properly tune and tension the wheelset. This is usually the most economical way to go before dropping bucks on a wheelset which might be a real improvement. And based on your weight, a 25mm will certainly be more comfortable and more efficient than a 23. Even going to a 28 on the rear might be worth a try. Good tires make a difference - about the same as good wheels - and definitely easier on the wallet as a start.

IN the end, 'feeling' faster may or may not be accurate. Time yourself, on the same route, under same conditions, when you're feeling about the same. Make it at least a 45 min course. A short course will favor which ever you can 'power' thru. A longer course will always favor the most efficient ride.

Spend some time with experienced roadies who might be open to giving pointers on improving on road performance is always a good thing.

tuning the motor pays the biggest dividends.

I went yesterday with my tricross at the shop just to be able to do the same course I did with the Crux to, like you said, compare a mcintosh with a granny smith... and now, I'm not to sure if I'm going to buy the Crux this year... Yes, it is more nervous and more fun to turn corner with :-)... but they are very similar in term of speed and power... with the Crux having the hand on acceleration by a little margin... So, is it worth 2200$? Not sure, I think I may pass my turn this season and continue to think about it and maybe try to demo other bikes since mine is still in good condition...

 Also, I realized that when I'm on the crux, I'm more ahead than on the Tricross, so I moved foward my saddle just a couple of mm and felt right away that I was in a more better position for climbing and getting a little more power... It will never be the same as the Crux but may be enough for now... Also, I've heard about the Cannondale Synapse that is supposed to be a comfy road bike and saw that Cannondale is way cheaper than Specialized for same level of components... so maybe I'll go dig there...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott43 View Post
 

It's very hard to talk gear with some people..and this isn't directed at anyone in this thread, we all seem pretty rational here.  That's why I like to say the "religious gear people".  :D  I look at my race times..gear in the performance sense isn't making any difference to me..a very little maybe.  Body position, aero position, general fitness, technique..all of these things are far greater at my level than any gear changes.  I mean, yeah, it can be said that deep rims are worth a second or whatever a kilometer...that's not my focus.  I suck..I'm mid-pack masters..fitness is my target.  It's like motorcycle racing..5hp isn't going to win you races when you're mid-pack..will it help?  Yeah..but..you have bigger fish to fry.  If you just want to get gear to feel new things and experience better gear, that's awesome and I get that.  I really try to focus people on bike fit, riding technique and durable gear that will let you pile on miles.

I ( begin to) hear you...:o

post #39 of 44
Thread Starter 

So finally, I will not keep the tricross... and will not buy the cruz...but will buy the Argon 18 Krypton X Road!

http://www.argon18bike.com/bikes/road/krypton-xroad-2015.html

 

It will be full 105 and shimano full hydraulic brakes... It will have the solidity of a cyclocross bike but the geometry is even more road than the cruz... and the quality of the carbon will be better...so is the look...

post #40 of 44
Thread Starter 

Before buying the X Road, I also tried a Giant TCX SLR 1 from 2014 with Sram rival and sram hydraulic brakes... The guy at that shop was giving me a nice price and I must say that it seems  a nice bike but something bad happen... for the first time in my life ( at almost 50), I fell off riding a road bike!!!

From the moment I got on the bike, I felt like I was higher than usual and that the bike was limit too big for me... I ask the guy and he said not to worry, that it was going to be fien with the fitting and all... So I ask to try it on the road and he agreed... It felt ok on the street but still felt a little big and high...and then it happened, I fell while turning at the corner of a street where everything seemed normal! I scratched myself on the process and also the shifter levels...

I went back home and did some researchs...It was a large that Giant say is the equivalent of a 55.5 cm but when you look at the geometry, the stand over height is 32.8 inches ( 83.3 cm) and top tube lenght is 57.5 cm... It seems very big for something that is said to be a 55.5 cm bike! When I'm standing over it, I can barely lift the bike...

Also, I've find out that the TCX has a much higher BB than the other bikes I'm used to ride... So I'm guessing that these 2 things could explain why I fell cornering the bike...

 

 

I now have kind of a dilemma... The shop where I tried (and scratch) the TCX also sell Argon 18 Bikes... but they never talked to me about the X road and kept pushing the tcx even when I 

said I felt it was too big for me and that I felt it was too high... I'm planning to buy the X Road at the shop where they talked me into buying one because... they are the ones that got me into buying one!!!:D They had the arguments and took the time to answer all of my questions regarding that bike... But at the same time, I feel kind of obliged to the other bike shop that also sell these bikes because I scratched the tcx... but at the same time, I feel that if they didn't tried to sell me a bike that I felt was too big and with a BB that is too high, I wouldn't have fell... What do you think?

post #41 of 44
Don't buy an expensive bike from a shop that you don't feel comfortable with in the long haul. If you feel bad about the shifters go in there and say, "I'm buying a bike from another shop and want to offer to give you some money for the shifters I scratched." If you care how much money, tell them how much you're prepared to fork over. (Just happened to be in a shop the other day when an acquaintance came in to pick up a bike on which they replaced one shifter and the bill was $260. So know what you're up against before you make a commitment.)
post #42 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogsie View Post
 

 I feel that if they didn't tried to sell me a bike that I felt was too big and with a BB that is too high, I wouldn't have fell... What do you think?

You didn't fall because they put you on a bike that felt too big, that is silly talk. That's what I think.

post #43 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

Don't buy an expensive bike from a shop that you don't feel comfortable with in the long haul. If you feel bad about the shifters go in there and say, "I'm buying a bike from another shop and want to offer to give you some money for the shifters I scratched." If you care how much money, tell them how much you're prepared to fork over. (Just happened to be in a shop the other day when an acquaintance came in to pick up a bike on which they replaced one shifter and the bill was $260. So know what you're up against before you make a commitment.)

I tought that one way to pay them back was to buy there the stuff I'm planning to buy this summer: 2 set of pedals, one pair of shoes,etc... Anyway, I already bought a mtb there 2 years ago... Maybe I'll just go and say that I'll pay half of the cost like you suggest... Thanks for the input!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
 

You didn't fall because they put you on a bike that felt too big, that is silly talk. That's what I think.

No. I'm saying that maybe the fact that the bike was too big and with a higher gravity center didn't help me...Also had a pair of tires with big side knobs...maybe I pushed them too far... Just trying to understand what happened...

And what I'm saying is that they are the experts, certainly not me, so I think the responsability is splitted...

post #44 of 44

if I were you  i will try this http://www.windsailbike.com/fat-bike-rims, maybe you will find something you interested in.:)

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