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TREK RECALL

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
post #2 of 23

Or learn how to properly use a quick release lever. It's truly amazing how many people come into the shop with the lever in the open position, yet cranked all the way clockwise to hold the wheel on.

post #3 of 23

It's unbelievable, isn't it?

post #4 of 23

Does @Trekchick know whether this quick release recall applies to @Philpug  ??

 

 

Sorry, I just couldn't help myself. ;) 


Edited by Gunnerbob - 4/23/15 at 8:01am
post #5 of 23

Somebody threatened to sue us once..a spoke broke on his wheel 3 months after we changed a tube on his bike.  He continued riding and he claimed the spoke wrapped around the hub, caused the wheel to stop and he went over the bars.  He claimed we should have known the spoke would break (!!) and that it was negligent to have a wheel designed in such a way that a broken spoke could cause an accident.  Never heard about it again.  There are some horrifically dumb people out there..  I always ask people, have you ever read the Owner's Manual in your car?  I'd say 90% of people never do...

post #6 of 23

Wouldn't this really apply to ANY quick release, not just Trek?

Also, perhaps a stupid question: for those of us with the Fox forks with the thru axle system, I'm assuming this does not apply?

 

Or does it "not apply" to those of us who know how to properly use a quick release lever?

post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by contesstant View Post
 

Wouldn't this really apply to ANY quick release, not just Trek?

Also, perhaps a stupid question: for those of us with the Fox forks with the thru axle system, I'm assuming this does not apply?

 

Or does it "not apply" to those of us who know how to properly use a quick release lever?


Regarding any QR, not really.  Some (most?) QR's automatically stop at 180 Degrees of closed so they can't extend beyond the plane of the clamp surface.  Some don't and go beyond that plane and hence into the brake disc.  But yes, any mfg who used a QR like that in their build would have the same issue and should do a similar recall I suppose.

 

Regarding a thru-axle system, the threat is still there I suppose.  It depends how long the lever is and whether it can get around the fork body to interfere with the disc.  On a non thru-axle system you could just flip the QR and the lever would be on the non-disc side..with a thru-axle system, you're stuck if the disc is on the same side as the lever. 

 

If you use a QR properly it's unlikely to happen to you.  However, accidents to happen..it's entirely unlikely but possible the lever could come loose during a ride and you might not notice. 

 

On a side note, if you have a disc brake and vertical drop-outs on your fork, there is a force acting in the direction of the slots that works to eject the wheel out of the drop-outs.  So if you don't use a good amount of force to clamp the wheel and you've taken off the lawyer tabs/lip, you could eject the wheel on a hard stop.  Thru-axle avoids this problem.

post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnerbob View Post
 

Does @Trekchick know whether this quick release recall applies to @Philpug  ??

 

 

Sorry, I just couldn't help myself. ;) 


The @Philpug  model hasn't had any issues.  Perhaps it has something to do with the vows.  (Those who attended our wedding will probably understand this :D)

post #9 of 23

The news articles I've seen on this seem awfully skimpy on the details (shocking, I know...).

 

All they seem to say about the actual issue is:

Quote:
A quick-release lever on the bike's front-wheel hub can come into contact with the front disc brake assembly, resulting in either complete wheel separation or the wheel coming to an instant stop.

 

Did this make it nearly impossible to  properly close the quick release lever?  If the user has to position the QR lever "just so" to get it to close properly, that does seem like a design defect and not necessarily a case of "people don't know how to close a QR".

post #10 of 23
Thread Starter 

yeah, I have a superfly and I am still not sure if its in the recall. 

post #11 of 23

I don't think the Fox thru-axle would be under that recall. The lever only happens 90 degrees. The ones that are affected can open 180 degrees or more and then people "screw them down" to close them. That is the problem.

post #12 of 23
Thread Starter 

Here's the recall notice.  It seems like its not really a defect, its more like what @RatherPlayThanWork posted.  

 

http://www.trekbikes.com/pdf/recalls/20150421/15TK_QRRecall_WebNotice_USEN.pdf

 

 

 


SAFETY RECALL NOTICE

 

Some Trek bicycles were sold equipped with disc brakes and a front quick release lever that opens 

past 180° (fig. 1). If the quick release is improperly adjusted or
left open on a bicycle which also has a front disc brake, the quick release lever can become caught 
in the front disc brake assembly (fig. 2). If this happens, the front wheel could separate or come 
to a sudden stop and the rider could lose control of the bicycle.

 

Trek wants you to be safe. You should always correctly adjust the quick release on your bicycle 

before you ride. Trek’s Owner’s Manual contains detailed instructions for proper quick release 
installation and removal. If you do not have a Trek Owner’s Manual, see your local Trek retailer.

Additional information on proper quick release adjustment, including videos on quick release 
installation and removal, is available on Trek’s website: manuals and safety. More videos 
demonstrating proper quick release adjustment are available on Trek’s YouTube channel: without 
washers and with washers. We encourage you to review these materials and to consult your local Trek 
retailer with any questions regarding proper use of your quick release.

 

This letter contains important information regarding what to do next if you have one of these 

bicycles. Your safety is very important to us. Therefore, if desired, Trek will replace the front 
quick release mechanism on affected bicycle, free of charge. This includes replacement of the 
specially-designed quick release with washers if it has already been installed on your bike.

 


AFFECTED MODELS
Any Trek bicycle equipped with disc brakes and a front quick release lever that can open beyond 
180º and contact the disc brake assembly is affected. If you are unsure whether your bicycle has 
this combination, please take it to your local Trek retailer for a free inspection.

 


WHAT TREK WILL DO FOR OWNERS OF A RECALLED BICYCLE
If you own a bicycle that is affected by this recall and would like a replacement quick release, 
Trek will provide you—through your Trek retailer—a free replacement quick release, including free 
installation. In addition, you will receive a $20 coupon to use towards any Bontrager product 
redeemable through December 31, 2015 at your local authorized Trek retailer. This coupon has no 
cash value. If you have any questions, please contact your retailer, or call Trek at the safety and 
recall hotline: 800.373.4594

 


THANK YOU FOR BUYING A TREK BICYCLE
We sincerely apologize for the inconvenience this has caused you. We value you as a customer and 
want you to safely enjoy cycling on your Trek bicycle.

This letter was prepared in cooperation with the Consumer Product Safety Commission. If you have 
questions about the information in this letter, please contact your Trek retailer.

post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post

 

Did this make it nearly impossible to  properly close the quick release lever?  If the user has to position the QR lever "just so" to get it to close properly, that does seem like a design defect and not necessarily a case of "people don't know how to close a QR".

 

Well..in a litigious environment..make something idiot-proof and they find a better idiot with a good lawyer.

post #14 of 23

If it wasn't for the "lawyer-tabs" on forks QRs wouldn't need to get twisted anyway. That is probably your real culprit.

post #15 of 23

I know the storm my question is going to cause.......but there's no more snow to ski so we need some amusement.

 

Was he wearing a helmet? :dunno :duck: 

post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
 

If it wasn't for the "lawyer-tabs" on forks QRs wouldn't need to get twisted anyway. That is probably your real culprit.


I can't tell you how many lawyer tabs we ground off back in the day..

post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott43 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

 
If it wasn't for the "lawyer-tabs" on forks QRs wouldn't need to get twisted anyway. That is probably your real culprit.


I can't tell you how many lawyer tabs we ground off back in the day..

There is a good joke buried in there somewhere.
post #18 of 23
But seriously, folks, if you don't know how to use a quick release, have someone who does show you.

Do the 30 second inspection before each ride.

Off hours, spend some time with your bike in the stand just getting familiar with how things are supposed to look and feel and sound, so you'll know if something seems "off."

If something is loose, notice it's loose (first step, missed by a surprising number), then fix it right or get it fixed right.
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post


There is a good joke buried in there somewhere.


I had to work real hard not to go for the helmet troll..  :D

post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

But seriously, folks, if you don't know how to use a quick release, have someone who does show you.

Do the 30 second inspection before each ride.

Off hours, spend some time with your bike in the stand just getting familiar with how things are supposed to look and feel and sound, so you'll know if something seems "off."

If something is loose, notice it's loose (first step, missed by a surprising number), then fix it right or get it fixed right.

 

Good advice.  We regularly had to explain how the QR worked to customers.  This is not as uncommon as many would think.  But it's a critical thing.

post #21 of 23

What's a quick-release? You mean that wing-nut thingy?:dunno

 

I'm pretty sure the first thing they teach you in bicycle mechanic school is how to correct a customer's improper use of bicycle terminology with just the right tone of condescension.

 

Custy: I think I need a longer goose-neck.

Shop Rat: Stem?

Custy: Is that what it's called? How 'bout a set o' rat-traps for the pedals?

Shop Rat: Face-palm

 

FWIW, I've worked in a number of shops that were very pro-active in instructing customers on the proper use of their equipment, offered free mechanical clinics, performed cross-checks of other mechanic's work, etc. Sometimes though, things still slip through the cracks. I can also still remember the rounded off nuts on the axles of my sting-ray from using the first thing I could find on my dad's work bench (usually vice-grips) to change a flat. Did you know that chisels make excellent flat tip screwdrivers?:D  


Edited by MT Skull - 4/25/15 at 8:15am
post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott43 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
 

If it wasn't for the "lawyer-tabs" on forks QRs wouldn't need to get twisted anyway. That is probably your real culprit.


I can't tell you how many lawyer tabs we ground off back in the day..

 

Back in the day?   You mean you've stopped?  

post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

 

Back in the day?   You mean you've stopped?  


Yeah, I only work on my own bikes now..and a few friends..  :)

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