or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Janne Lahtela mogul technique
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Janne Lahtela mogul technique

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Janne Lahtela mogul technique video

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SXTlGZfgNXk

 

Super smooth carving turns

post #2 of 11

Arigato gozimas.

post #3 of 11

From the English interview I was expecting to see something like Dan's book. It's surprising how Janne has a heel push/wedge in his outside ski in the that first free ski demo and that it is apparently on purpose. The open and close the stance width is really cool. One thing I hadn't noticed in Dan's book was doing the short turns on groomed snow with lowered hips. Loved the GS turns in the bumps! Stiff skis are very important so don't get skis that are too stiff if you are trying to learn the bumps. That could have been worded a little better. I wonder what "speedo control" is. Is that a weight limit for people wearing tiny bathing suits? The hold the poles level drill is really awesome. It's weird how Janne bobs his head/bends at the hips in some clips and not in others. Not sure what he's demonstrating there (before 15:37). Seems he does that more in his real runs than I'd like to see. But keeping the upper body steady is easier said than done.

post #4 of 11
Great video. I wonder if there is a copy not dubbed into Japanese?
post #5 of 11

The heel push is pretty jarring and you do see it in the bump skiing anytime his stance opens at all.

post #6 of 11

Good video, it all starts with learning to carve quickly on the groomed (flats), after all, Lahtela is teaching how to carve the zipperline.  I call the turn a "deflected carve turn."  He is not teaching how to skid from  bump to bump.

 

There is no discussion of A&E because he's teaching how to carve the zipperline and not teaching the pivot /skid.

 

Notice how he consistently extends into the turn finish just as he does on the flats, his turns are the same on the groomed as they are in the bumps.  Pretty much goes along with what I've been saying around here for years.

 

Thanks for posting.

 

Nail

post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nailbender View Post
 

Good video, it all starts with learning to carve quickly on the groomed (flats), after all, Lahtela is teaching how to carve the zipperline.  I call the turn a "deflected carve turn."  He is not teaching how to skid from  bump to bump.

 

There is no discussion of A&E because he's teaching how to carve the zipperline and not teaching the pivot /skid.

 

Notice how he consistently extends into the turn finish just as he does on the flats, his turns are the same on the groomed as they are in the bumps.  Pretty much goes along with what I've been saying around here for years.

 

Thanks for posting.

 

Nail

 

Janne and his team mates ripped the up the course because they had excellent A&E. They used the higher line to get their speed scores up. Basically, they contour the backside and got their control on the frontside by the absorption. The drill where he makes turns with his hip lowered is the progression, this allows him to get weighted properly and to "bite" near or around the crest of the absorption. With that, he can control his turn up the frontside and when to release for the decent on the backside. 

 

Just a bit of history..... when Mosely was getting the media hype about his "dinner roll" trick during his comeback at 02 Olympics, Janne and others blew away Jonny's speed by .5 to 1 sec. The sport changed on Jonny, the field started to ski this higher line for speed and this was started by Janne and his crew.  

post #8 of 11

@Nail,

I think you are reading more into this Absorption/Extension terminology than the term actually means.  If you look at Janne's skiing on the groomed (first seven minutes?) and his skiing in the bumps (starting about 7:35), you see the only difference between his groomed skiing and his bump skiing is that as he goes over bumps his legs act like the suspension on a car or bike, allowing him to keep the same pressure timing in his turns that he has on the groomer or that he wants.   That's all it means, just like a wheel compresses a spring when it goes over a bump, and the spring pushes the wheel down later, except it's a smart suspension that the skier controls.   The term absorption simple means the suspension going up due to the rise in the surface.  The skier decides how much force will be affecting his motion as he pushes his feet down.  The skier decides how much force will be applied to him from the snow as the suspension (feet) get pushed up (changing the spring rate and compression damping as it were), and how much force will be applied to him as he pushes his feet down (altering the rebound damping and spring rate), balancing out the forces on the snow as he wishes.

 

Janne doesn't mention A/E, because it is so obvious that the feet will go up and down and the body will remain much smoother and unperturbed, and that this action can be controlled.  Still some people need the obvious pointed out to them, so Dan Mentions it.

 

It seems to me that both skiers (Dan and Janne)  use similar ski motion to control their descent, but it also seems to me that Janne powers the ski rotation mostly through tipping and snow-ski interaction, while Dan is using a lot more pivoting of (unweighted) skis through direct body torque.  My knees prefer Janne's way.

 

(Thanks for letting me comment even though I haven't bought a book! ;) )

post #9 of 11

Embedding the video for easier viewing. 

 

Based on the comments in the original post I expected to see mogul skiing like Patrick Deneen. 

A few years back I recall conversations with @Philpug and @Bob Barnes about Patrick's turn shape and how smooth his mogul skiing is. 

post #10 of 11

Another visible element, using terrain to your advantage, in the second video, you can see how he uses the shape of the bump to help turn his skis as he pushes them down with the bump he is on the downwards side of pushes his tails sideways to a steering angle prior to biting into the turn.  With nice uniform bumps you can get a rhythm going.

post #11 of 11

Great video, thanks for posting.

 

Ghost, Janne is pointing out the importance of a good fore aft balance. Much like any ski racing coach. I think your comment was dead on. Flexing is just a way of absorbing the bump. The real stuff is extending into the rut and into the face of the next bump. Thats what relates to me from the video anyway. He also talks about for/aft balance in the jump segment. That was always one of his trademarks, perfect balance. Mashine like efficiency. Speed.

 

The clips where he carves in the bumps is great. Nice approach. Insted of the usual "nail that short turn on flats and then take it to the bumps" mantra he tells us to "nail that long turn on flats and then take that long turn to the bumps". So its not a question of specific bump skiing technique, its more a question of being able to cope with bumps at high speed. Slamming yourself into the zipper line is then only a question of lightning quick legs. Speed is there to start with.

 

BTW, Josh Matta commented on the video: awful alignment LOL

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Janne Lahtela mogul technique