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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Zipfit Liner. Cork material sitting kind of low. How long does it take to break in?
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Zipfit Liner. Cork material sitting kind of low. How long does it take to break in?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Have a Zipfit Grand prix and Zipfit Indy on hand to test out the fit. They are both mondo 26.5 (my feet are ~26.75).

 

I noticed that the cork material in the heel area feels like it's about one cm lower than where it ideally should be, mostly on the Grand Prix.  Like it's pinching the base of the heels rather than the cavity area behind the ankle bone. 

 

This is testing it with a very thin footbed inserted too. The thicker SOLE footbed i usually use just exaggerates the issue.

 

Haven't yet tried the thing where you heat the liner and shell up and allow it to mold. Will this do the trick in shifting the cork material up higher to where it needs to be? I haven't had it on for more than 20 minutes either. Maybe it just needs more time to break in?

 

It could also be because it was pretty hard to put on and me forcing my foot down into the boot shifted the cork down also. 

 

The heel area on the Grand Prix also feels much harder than the Indy. Like you can really feel the firmness of the cork. It's actually sort of painful right now, but maybe this just has to do with the cork not being properly molded yet.

 

On the indy, the cork doesn't feel quite as low. The Indy also uses a thicker neoprene material all throughout so the cork feels softer. I think this also means it's slightly less snug than the grand prix. Plus it makes other areas up front feel more cramped so i might have to do more shell punching.

 

Ideally, I'd like to just go with the Grand Prix if i know i can get the cork to break in. I have very narrow heels/ankles and i can already tell the zipfits are going to do the job better than the intuitions i've used before?

 

So is this a common issue with zipfits?

post #2 of 8

You can push that cork material around in the liners with your fingers. Where did you buy them that you did not have them heat molded to your feet and boots? They will feel quite horrific until you heat mold them.

post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

Ordered them online because no local place sells them.

 

I guess i should probably just heat mold them to test the fit. It's not like they're intuitions where they look obviously heat molded.

post #4 of 8

Gotcha. OK, you will not know how they are going to work/feel until they are molded. And yes, they can be remolded as needed. I use a hot gear bag with mine so they are warm every time I put them on. They are amazing for heel hold.

post #5 of 8

Go to the website and watch/read the hoisting process. Warm up the liner (and shells if possible but not 100% necessary if at room temperature) and spread the cork out a bit with your thumbs. Then try the hoisting process at least a handful of times per the website. This will help a bunch but you will have to ski them to get the fit completely dialed. Outstanding product; hang in there as they will continue to get better each time. If not a dealer can remove some of the cork but give it time and keep at it before removing cork. 

post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquawBrat View Post
 

Go to the website and watch/read the hoisting process. Warm up the liner (and shells if possible but not 100% necessary if at room temperature) and spread the cork out a bit with your thumbs. Then try the hoisting process at least a handful of times per the website. This will help a bunch but you will have to ski them to get the fit completely dialed. Outstanding product; hang in there as they will continue to get better each time. If not a dealer can remove some of the cork but give it time and keep at it before removing cork. 


Yes, the hoisting process is crucial! I meant to mention that but forgot--thanks for bringing it up. Must be done each time the boots are put on. If you don't do it, your foot will never be seated properly in the boot and shell.

post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 

Which method of heat molding is better?

1) Heat just the shell up and put the liner inside? (Instructions from the ZipFit guy):
[url]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=28uDBBCfzd0&list=PLN5k5K-9e_qySVGawgv-ePwdkazrwIGy4&index=4[/url]

 

I'm not sure if you're supposed to keep the water boiling the whole time the shell is in the pot or turn off the heat.

 

2) Heat both shell and liner in oven. I found these instructions on a TGR post. 

 

"Here are my ZipFit instructions.  I developed this process over many fittings and re-fittings and it works for me - YMMV.

ZipFit Liner Fitting Instructions:

1. Pre-heat oven to 250 degrees for 10 minutes
2. Remove the liner and powerstrap from the boot shell, also remove the footbed from the liner
3. Set oven to 225  (ZipFit recommends 228) and heat boot shell (buckle-side down) and liner for 10 minutes (on a layer of aluminum foil)
  OR *** Heat liner in microwave for 60 seconds at 50% power *** (better to use oven at 225 along with the shell, but this is the more "official" option)
4. Remove liner from oven
5. Replace footbed in liner after heating
6. Put liner on foot and tighten laces
7. Remove shell from oven
8. Put foot with liner into shell
9. Buckle shell (wrap powerstrap around top temporarily), set ankle pocket, and flex forward a few times

Once liner and shell have cooled to room (or body temp) remove.


This process can mess with your shells if you're not careful (depends on the plastic).  I've done this with Flexon and Krypton shells with no problem.  The resulting fit is on a par with thermoflex type liners, but the ZipFit is far more responsive.

More specifically to the OP, there are different ZipFit liners available with different volumes.  I've only been successful with the low volume liners with the Flexon and Krypton.  If you have one of the higher volume liner models then you need to also be using a higher volume shell."

post #8 of 8

I heated my shells in boiling water for 5 minutes or so and with the liner on foot put in boot , buckled and flexed boot in skiing position until cooled, they feel party tight at first but get better as time shoes on.  After that about 3 ski days you should be good. I never buckle boots very tight. the heal hold down is incredible and after 120 day still like new.  

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Zipfit Liner. Cork material sitting kind of low. How long does it take to break in?