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Where did "bell to bell" come from? - Page 2

post #31 of 46
Thread Starter 

Seemingly good explanation of "under the wire" and "wire to wire" : http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-dow1.htm

post #32 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
 

?  I don't recognize that saying.  Do skiers around you say that?  I know an expression "down to the wire" that the interwebs sez comes from an overhead finish line marker in horse racing.

It's actually pretty common in golf terms, just means leading the whole tournament.

I think this thread needs some more outlandish theories.  Maybe its from when standings were transmitted via Western Union.  Actually, maybe it isn't that far out.  I have heard releasing a press release described as "putting it out on the wire."

post #33 of 46
Quote:

Originally Posted by mdf View Post

 

I think this thread needs some more outlandish theories.  Maybe its from when standings were transmitted via Western Union.  Actually, maybe it isn't that far out.  I have heard releasing a press release described as "putting it out on the wire."

 

 

I think it has to do with skiing between belle and belle.  Two different women.


Edited by SkiMangoJazz - 4/13/15 at 8:53am
post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
 

?  I don't recognize that saying.  Do skiers around you say that?  I know an expression "down to the wire" that the interwebs sez comes from an overhead finish line marker in horse racing.

It's actually pretty common in golf terms, just means leading the whole tournament.

I think this thread needs some more outlandish theories.  Maybe its from when standings were transmitted via Western Union.  Actually, maybe it isn't that far out.  I have heard releasing a press release described as "putting it out on the wire."


Telegram, cable and wire synonymously refer to sending a message over the pre-telephone telegraph system. 

post #35 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by H2OnSnow View Post
 
 

Telegram, cable and wire synonymously refer to sending a message over the pre-telephone telegraph system. 

Actually it extended well into the post-telephone but pre-internet era.  Associated Press (AP) and the other news services had dedicated teletype machines in their subscribing newsrooms.  Cutting the continuous-feed paper into individual stories was "ripping the wire".  There is still a company named "business wire" that distributes press releases.

post #36 of 46

I prefer to ski wire to bell.

post #37 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mdf View Post

 

I think this thread needs some more outlandish theories.  Maybe its from when standings were transmitted via Western Union.  Actually, maybe it isn't that far out.  I have heard releasing a press release described as "putting it out on the wire."

 

 

I think it has to do with skiing between belle and belle.  Two different women.

Yeah, that could be it.  We all know that skiing started as a mode of transportation.  Certainly it could follow that the first 'recreational' application wen't something like, "Hey Belle, I'm going out for a pack of cigarettes, be back in a couple of hours......"  Hello, Belle.

 

#mostmenarestupid #onebelleisusuallymorethanenough

 

Or maybe it's a bastardization of the Italian bella a bella....skiing from one beautiful place to another.

post #38 of 46

But seriously....

 

I've never been fond of this term because other than its common usage I didn't have a grasp on its relationship to skiing and to me it brings to mind a work day, an obligation rather than an opportunity.  I suppose if my portfolio were a bit more robust I would view this differently.  I much prefer first chair to last as it infers specific planning and execution to squeeze the last bit of joy out of a ski day.

post #39 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpfreaq View Post
 

I much prefer first chair to last as it infers specific planning and execution to squeeze the last bit of joy out of a ski day.

 

In my mind "bell to bell" is the same thing... from the very start to the very finish. FWIW, I've learned both the terms "first chair" and "bell to bell" this season, and I find myself using them both; But I haven't heard or picked up "first chair to last chair" or anything like that. I think "bell to bell" is convenient, catchy short-hand for it.

post #40 of 46

Didn't mean that first chair to last is an old chestnut, just that it's what I would rather write =)

post #41 of 46

For me there is a subtle difference.  "First chair" means literally first, you were the first one in line.  If you are in the lift maze when the chairs start (or even nearby talking and "look, the lift started early, lets go!") then that counts for bell-to-bell.

 

I think I've only been first chair a couple of times in my life.  I have even gotten there really early, stood in the maze awhile, went off to look at something while keeping an eye on the maze, and then "hey, where did they come from?" and been 3rd chair.

 

And at Jackson Hole, some lessons/camps go up the Tram before first chair (first box?).  You stand at Corbet's Cabin waiting for the mountain to open.  It's a green light, not a bell, though.

post #42 of 46

Yeah, you're right first chair is pretty specific.  Guess I've never been a bell to bell type anyway.

 

I got first chair on a pow day at Mt. Bohemia once.  Then the sixth then the twelfth then they opened the other lift so the crowd dispersed a bit.

post #43 of 46

From Nordica...

 

post #44 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

From Nordica...

 

 

Awesome... I... I just... I just had no idea.... that SMJ knew what he was talking about! ;):D

post #45 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpfreaq View Post
 

Yeah, you're right first chair is pretty specific.  Guess I've never been a bell to bell type anyway.

 

I got first chair on a pow day at Mt. Bohemia once.  Then the sixth then the twelfth then they opened the other lift so the crowd dispersed a bit.

 

I got first chair on a pow day on the Burfield Chair at Sun Peaks once. After a 22 minute ride up and an 8 minute ski down I then got second chair.:D

I then tried for a 3rd chair but by now it was 10am and someone else got the 3rd chair just ahead of me so I had to settle for fourth 1,2,4.:mad

post #46 of 46

Bell to bell is always associated in my mind with the New York Stock Exchange

 

Quote:

Similar to the school bells that most of us heard during our school days, the New York Stock Exchange's (NYSE) opening and closing bells mark the beginning and the end of each trading day. More specifically, the opening bell is rung at 9:30am EST to mark the start of the day's trading session. At 4pm the closing bell is rung and trading for the day stops. There are bells located in each of the four main sections of the NYSE that all ring at the same time once a button is pressed.

 

Interestingly enough, the signal to start and stop trading wasn't always a bell.

 

The original signal was a gavel, but during the late 1800s, the NYSE decided to switch the gavel for a gong to signal the day's beginning and end. However, after the NYSE changed to its present location at 18 Broad Street in 1903, the gong was switched to the bell format that we see today.



 
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