or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Foot surgery/Exostectomy

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Basically, I'm having them grind bone growths (is this the same as a bunion? dunno) off the outside of my forefoot. Really strarted rubbing last year didn't notice until it was pretty significant. Anyway, I thought I would deall with it before the season since there is some recovery involved. (Well, obviously, they're cutting into the foot.)

1) I'm guessing others have had this done; any words of wisdom?

2) I'm assuming this was a chronic thing that just got bad enough to notice this season, so hopefully grinding it away will mean its something I don't have to deal w/ again for a long time if at all, but is there anything I can do to help prevent a recurrence? For example, I'm wondering if a full footbed (I have a half right now, which is good because it gives me more room in the toebox) would help.
post #2 of 22
Lodro, any kind of foot injury may possibly impede proprioception, so your first step would be to make sure that your doc gives you enough sessions with a physical therapist. Once you are cleared for activity,you can play with some of the balance/stability exercises that we have listed in various topics on this forum.

your footbed question is a good one, and I'd be curious to hear the answer. Maybe, post a variation of this thread in the gear forum? Good luck!
post #3 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Lisamarie:
[QB]Lodro, any kind of foot injury may possibly impede proprioception, so your first step would be to make sure that your doc gives you enough sessions with a physical therapist. [QB]
Physical thearpy neccessry for a two-three week recovery?
post #4 of 22
Lodro, don't take my word for it! [img]smile.gif[/img] Ask your doc what he thinks.In the "old days" physical therapy was not given for a sprained ankle. But nowadays, with the research that points to a loss of balance and proprioception after foot or ankle injuries, Pt is sometimes performed after ankle sprains.

[ October 28, 2002, 10:51 AM: Message edited by: Lisamarie ]
post #5 of 22
I think "bunion" surgery is a misnomer as used here. A bunion is a swelling at the base of the big toe that causes misalignment of the toe (reorients the big toe on top of or beneath the next toe in extreme cases). Repair is a rather extensive surgical procedure that CAN involve the tendons that control the big toe.

Lodro said "outside of the forefoot", which I took to mean behind the little toe.

I get a "tender" spot from ski boots just a bit behind my little toe of one foot. I've had to have boots bulged out in that spot and footbeds ground down under that area. Fortunately, those steps have been sufficient to avoid any invasive action on my foot.
post #6 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Kneale Brownson:
Lodro said "outside of the forefoot", which I took to mean behind the little toe.

I get a "tender" spot from ski boots just a bit behind my little toe of one foot. I've had to have boots bulged out in that spot and footbeds ground down under that area. Fortunately, those steps have been sufficient to avoid any invasive action on my foot.
Ah, cool, yep that where my problem is, thanks for the clarification..been wondering about that. Yea, the problem is that the painful area is very local, and pretty acute. Its more toward the top than the bottom. If I had caught it soon enough I would probably have been able to get away w/ boot work, but frankly I just don't want to risk losing a month or so of ski season because a boot fix won't work (which I think it won't.) Realize that sounds a bit backasswards.
post #7 of 22
I have bony growths on the outside of my foot also- I had my boot ground out and that helped the problem-Have you tried this with your boots? My opinion on this is to avoid any kind of invasive surgery unless you have no other options.
I have bunions also and my boots have been adjusted there also.
Good Luck!!

Terry
post #8 of 22
Whoa!

Unless you have some other reason to get your feet worked on, do the cutting and grinding on the boots. They have no feelings, and if things go bad, you can just buy some new ones and start over.

Really, A boot fitter can blow out a local area in a boot and you will still retain a good fit every where else.
That is how someone can fit into a ski boot shell size smaller that thier street shoe.

Note:
I hate any kind of surgery.

CalG
post #9 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by TCarey:
I have bony growths on the outside of my foot also- I had my boot ground out and that helped the problem-Have you tried this with your boots?
Thanks Terry. How big is your growth? OK, that's an awfully personal question... Anyway, mine is really pronouced so grinding almost certainly wouldn't work; my foot is quite wide at that point, and blowing it out enough to make a difference would (I'm afraid) leave me sliding around in there which would only make things worse. IOTW, the part w/ the growth is also the part that I need making good even contact with the boot to stabailize my foot; though I apprectiate heraing evidence to the contrary --still got a week and a half to make up my mind. But the other factor was the issue that it is only going to get worse; i.e., I'd prob. have to do this at some point soon no matter what.

What it comes down to is that I'd rather take the surgical risks (slight for this kind of surgery) than have to spend a whole season in pain...if I knew someone could fix it for sure I'd go w/ the fit appraoch; but I've had some bad luck with continuing to make boot adjustments while skiing and ending up in a situation where I wouldn't be able to ski for a while. Some things aren't fixable with any amount of adjustment.

Bottom line: this season is going to be my first full season in a very long time where I'll be able to ski almost every day and I don't want to mess it up. Call me crazy but at least I'm ski crazy. Isn't rationalization a lovely thing?
post #10 of 22
Lodro,
Well my bunions are quite large and they are pretty painful most of the time. However I have been lucky enough to have Greg Hoffman work on my boots a little bit at a time to make my day in ski boots pretty comfortable. I also have a heel spur which is really big and some other adjustments have been made here too.
I also have a very wide foot. Still I have had much success with Green Mountain Orthotic Lab.(Stratton Mt)
I would still try to exhaust all otptions before surgery!Grind the boot not the feet until you are REALLY sure.
Hope this helps!! Terry
post #11 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by TCarey:
Lodro,
I would still try to exhaust all otptions before surgery!Grind the boot not the feet until you are REALLY sure.
Hope this helps!! Terry
Thanks Terry. Hmmm, you have given me food for thought. I also have a huge heel spur, but it hasn't given me problems.
post #12 of 22
Have you tried copying this - or posting a link to it - in the Gear section in the boot fitting thread?
There is a bootfitting expert there - check with him.
post #13 of 22
Lodro,
I had the same problem as you do. It is called a tailor's bunion or bunionette. One foot was worse than the other but both were painful after a full day of hard skiing. Having my ski boots ground and eventually punched out helped relieve the pain for a while but they got progressively worse until they also bothered me in street shoes. I had both feet operated on this summer
( not at the same time- a month apart ). With me it took 6 or 7 weeks for my foot not to be tender. I think you should allow yourself at least 6 weeks before you would be able to wear ski boots without pain. Good luck with whatever fix you decide on.
Hal
post #14 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Hal B:
Lodro,
I had the same problem as you do. It is called a tailor's bunion or bunionette. One foot was worse than the other but both were painful after a full day of hard skiing. Having my ski boots ground and eventually punched out helped relieve the pain for a while but they got progressively worse until they also bothered me in street shoes. I had both feet operated on this summer
( not at the same time- a month apart ). With me it took 6 or 7 weeks for my foot not to be tender. I think you should allow yourself at least 6 weeks before you would be able to wear ski boots without pain. Good luck with whatever fix you decide on.
Hal
Hey thanks Hal, that was _exactly_ what I was wondering about and what I was thinking; that it would jsut get worse and worse. Mine get quite painful within the first hour or two. And thanks for the postop info. 6 weeks, huh? Wow. Still I think the timing should be just about right. How long till you could wear street shoes?

[ October 30, 2002, 05:55 PM: Message edited by: Lodro ]
post #15 of 22
Lodro,
I wasn't able to wear street shoes for 3 weeks. I was on my feet quite a blt more than was recommended by my doctor so experienced probably more sewlling than is the norm. Both feet healed fine and I am looking forward to long days of skiing witnout my feet killing me.
Hal
post #16 of 22
tallus bunion?
post #17 of 22
I've got a growth on my ankle. Thermo fit liners and 2 ibuprofin do the trick.
post #18 of 22
March 15th of this year I had foot surgery. I had some bone removed from my second and third toes, right foot, and they cranked back the second toe and scraped out the joint (arthritis).

Before the surgery, running was impossible without lurching, I couldn't wear any shoe at all, even a cotton deck shoe. I could not stand on tiptoe.

After the surgery, I was wearing street shoes within 3 weeks, and I skied Mt. Bachelor in May, 2 months later. It was somewhat uncomfortable, but not totally unbearable. Now, it's like I never had a problem. It was worth it not to have this THING buggin me.

Go for it.
post #19 of 22
Thread Starter 
Thanks, everyone. Went in yesterday. Local only, very straightforward. Now recovering; and not moving from the couch, my last foray didn't go so well! Will followup after the season starts.
post #20 of 22
Lodro,
Did you have both feet done ? Good luck with your recovery.
Won't be long now......THINK SNOW
Hal
post #21 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Hal B:
Lodro,
Did you have both feet done ? Hal
Yep. Its almost two weeks now, sutures are out. I have been able to move around a lot less than I thought.
post #22 of 22
What dressings on wounds now?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav: