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Ski Videos via Automated Drones

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

This is an interesting new concept I saw on the Ski Diva site.

 

At Big White, BC, you can get 2 runs alone or with friends for $50 USD. Basically, put on an RFID tracker and go down one of the designated runs. The software controls the drone to go in a pre-defined flight pattern (up to 40 mph), but focuses on the person with the tracker. The company does some post-processing and you get a link a couple of days later.

 

https://www.capehq.com/bigwhite

 

 

post #2 of 17

Nice. That would be a great tool in the racecourse.

post #3 of 17

I would be so in for that.

 

Might not like what I see, but still want to see it.

post #4 of 17

Have you seen this thing. Not a drone, but affordable enough to just own one. I will probably get one this summer.

 

 

www.soloshot.com

post #5 of 17

Am I the only one who thinks it's only a matter of time before someone gets hurt because of one of these?

 

Skiing down the trail…WTF Is that? (looks up) AAHHHHH!!! TREE!!!

post #6 of 17

A bunch of discussion on this and other drone issues here : http://www.epicski.com/t/128758/does-your-mountain-have-a-uav-drone-policy

post #7 of 17

Appears they've done some sleight of hand with the editing.

They cut away the drone video, each time the drone flies further and further away to keep the transmitter in the shot. 

 

Looks like they need some work on this.

 

 

Also..

 

I don't want to see drones on the slopes. It will cause accidents, and the mountain will be liable. Two skiers shussing along minding their own business, and they both look up to see an object buzzing above them. They collide. Who is at fault?

 

I just don't see drones covered under an 'act of god' or 'hazards may exist' verbiage..

And  - if the mountain can provide drones, why can't my friends and I bring our own? We bring our own cameras, after all.

 

It will be Droners vs non-Droners - (People who own and operate drones - I just coined that phrase for all eternity on the internet).

Some mountains will allow drones, some will not.

 

Alta for example, will not allow drones while Taos and others will give in to pressure as their revenues decline.

post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwoof2 View Post

 

And  - if the mountain can provide drones, why can't my friends and I bring our own? We bring our own cameras, after all.

 

 

That's not a very good argument or idea IMO. For one, a resort can disallow anything it wants to, and doesn't have to have a good reason. Two, there are obviously many more potential issues with allowing drones than allowing cameras; Including the ones you yourself pointed out. Three, the number of problem with one or two resort controlled drones is not at all the same as potentially 20 or 50 or 100 drones controlled by customers. 

 

But it will be interesting to see if any resorts will allow the public to bring their own drones. My guess is that eventually none will, even if some give it a shot for a while.

post #9 of 17

There will be regulations coming.  One thing that will not be allowed is flying over people.  FAA has licensed a few production companies to do this, but they have to have a licensed pilot on the scene.

 

If it is  broad, open slope and the skiers  on it are limited to those being videoed by the drone I think it's fine.  However, they would get better shots if they had an operator flying the thing rather than the gps following a transmitter.  Yes they do cut to on the ground cameras in their promo, but if that is included in your video so much the better.

post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwoof2 View Post
 

Appears they've done some sleight of hand with the editing.

They cut away the drone video, each time the drone flies further and further away to keep the transmitter in the shot.

 

Looks like they need some work on this.

 

 

Also..

 

I don't want to see drones on the slopes. It will cause accidents, and the mountain will be liable. Two skiers shussing along minding their own business, and they both look up to see an object buzzing above them. They collide. Who is at fault?

 

I just don't see drones covered under an 'act of god' or 'hazards may exist' verbiage..

And  - if the mountain can provide drones, why can't my friends and I bring our own? We bring our own cameras, after all.

 

It will be Droners vs non-Droners - (People who own and operate drones - I just coined that phrase for all eternity on the internet).

Some mountains will allow drones, some will not.

 

Alta for example, will not allow drones while Taos and others will give in to pressure as their revenues decline.

 

They do close the runs they are doing this on.

post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbostedo View Post
 

 

That's not a very good argument or idea IMO. For one, a resort can disallow anything it wants to, and doesn't have to have a good reason. Two, there are obviously many more potential issues with allowing drones than allowing cameras; Including the ones you yourself pointed out. Three, the number of problem with one or two resort controlled drones is not at all the same as potentially 20 or 50 or 100 drones controlled by customers. 

 

But it will be interesting to see if any resorts will allow the public to bring their own drones. My guess is that eventually none will, even if some give it a shot for a while.

More than likely you will never see personal drones allowed.  Drones are regulated under the FAA at this point, and generally speaking, you must have a permit to use them and they are only allowed to be operated in certian areas.  Individual states also have strict regulations regarding who/how/where drones can be used, even going as far as requiring the drone operator to have full line of sight to the drone being used.

 

Drones also fall into the 'aviation' insurance segment as well - your average commercial general liability policy will not be able to cover exposures arising out of drone usage without some heavy endorsements, and most insurance companies are still trying to get their act together when it comes to this.  Even large rating orgs such as ISO are still trying to work out the kinks along with the ever changing legal landscape in the US.  Canada has a whole other set of rules too...

post #12 of 17

Personal drones definitely should not be allowed.  Line of sight is pretty standard and the drone operators I work with never lose sight of their UAV.  My go to guy has done some shooting for on mountain events though they were of the motorized variety and not skiing.

post #13 of 17

You guys ever see what the rules were for cars back in 1910 or so? You had to do things like light a fire and shoot a gun in the air before crossing an intersection. That's where we are with drones right now. In a few decades time we won't even notice them buzzing around.

post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
 

You guys ever see what the rules were for cars back in 1910 or so? You had to do things like light a fire and shoot a gun in the air before crossing an intersection. That's where we are with drones right now. In a few decades time we won't even notice them buzzing around.

I highly doubt that.  Automotive traffic exists on a 2D plane...much easier to control and to understand.  Aviation exists on a 3D plane (can even argue a 4D plane) and requires a lot more forethought into planning and movement of aero-nautical vessels.  And looking at it from an exposure basis, there is a lot more room for error and potential loss as a result of them.

 

Technology has come a long way in terms of travel - no longer do you have to shoot a gun at an intersection - we have stop lights.  While I agree that the regulation of drone operation will advance forward, they're not going to be as ubiquitous as birds or anything.

 

You also have privacy concerns with drones that don't exist with anything else really - the ability to spy, photograph, and see things with much more ease of access.  This creates a whole slew of personal injury issues that occur, which will suppress the advancement of regulation as well.

post #15 of 17
I can see advantages for Ski Patrol or Search & Rescue using drones.  What a marvelous way to sweep large inbounds areas or follow rope ducker tracks through sketchy places. The technology may not be there yet, but it is evolving fast, it is just a matter of time. 
 
Drones are being used for everything from check fence lines to real estate ads, this would seem like a natural.
post #16 of 17

Great post Stranger.  I agree and have no doubt drones will soon assist in saving lives.  My bride is a real estate agent and I plan to get her a Phantom3. She specializes in ranch sales.

post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowfan View Post
 

Great post Stranger.  I agree and have no doubt drones will soon assist in saving lives.  My bride is a real estate agent and I plan to get her a Phantom3. She specializes in ranch sales.


Rules regarding commercial use of drone photo/video is currently up in the air.  http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2014-03-06/drone-pilot-s-fine-dropped-by-judge-finding-against-faa

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