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Seattle or Portland - Page 2

post #31 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger View Post
 

Check the precipitation totals between Seattle and Portland. Portland gets a lot more rain.  It is a very cool city but a very wet one.

 

Look at the taxation between the two states. Washington no income tax but a fairly high sales tax. Oregon, a substantial income tax and no sales tax. Washington fits my situation better, but you should examine this.

 

Seattle Rain:  35"

Portland Rain:  38"

 

As far the tax situation goes, I'm one who figures state and local governments all have pretty similar needs when it comes to funding their operations, so they will get that funding one way or another.  Some states do it differently than others, but I don't believe the overall tax burden varies significantly from most states to others.  According to the Tax Foundation, overall state and local tax burdens are..

Washington:  9.4% of average state income

Oregon:  10.1% of average state income

Idaho is 9.5% 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by vickieh View Post

I looked only at closer-in housing ... where my maximum weekday commute would be about 30 minutes to downtown. You can find $300-400K housing that close in. I haven't looked at Gresham prices, but it wouldn't surprise me if that area was $100K cheaper.

I can't help with "progressive vibe, vibrant". I don't know what that means to you, or what it would feel like to me if I was in it. If "progressive vibe" is 1000 microbrews, 1000 wines, lots of bikes, ratty-looking beards, and getting to watch someone shoot up in a laundromat, Portland is your town.

 

When I speak of house size, I mean a typical, plain-jane house/condo.  I've scoured sites like Zillow and Redfin, and found quite a bit within reach in Portland away from downtown and in the surrounding towns.  I asked about Gresham for the very reason you suggested...closer to skiing, plus greater affordable housing availability.  I can find affordable homes pretty easily online myself, but I can't know what the area is like where they're located without exploring it myself or some local guidance.  Northwest Portland looks doable, too...but it adds to drive time to skiing.

 

Hmmm, progressive vibe...I know what it's not.  It's not a plethora of camouflaged jacked-up pick-ups and even cars all about, it's not bible-thumpers constantly banging on your door at all hours wanting to save you...even outside of town, it's not the 2nd-reddest state in the nation by representation, it's not government separatists looking for armed camp sites to hold off the gumm'int during the coming race war/gun-grab war/tyrant-"Obummer" inspired insurrection, etc., it's not a place with an outsized population of blatant bigots (this area was the location of "The Order" back in the day and a lot of that outlook still lingers), it's not a place where the surrounding woods sound like gun-nut war zones on the weekends...much less hunting season!  

 

So, the opposite of those things, I guess.  I'm fine with what you listed and can even live with the occasional junkie as long as he/she keeps to himself, as most do in my experience.  I hope that didn't sound like tooooo much of a screed and it wasn't questioning your question, but that's the best way I could think to put it at the moment.  There's also the issue of better accessibility to a wider variety of health care and amenities.  I couldn't get a 2nd neuro opinion, for example, in Spokane/CDA, because no other neuros were accepting patient consults!

 

Anyway, thanks for the tips.  I'll check out Gresham area and east Portland. 


Edited by Skierish - 4/4/15 at 9:40am
post #32 of 44

Please be aware that if skiing is a priority for you there is a substantial difference in the type of terrain available in the Seattle and Portland areas.  In my limited experience in Oregon I have found that the slopes are gentler and the variety of terrain is less on volcanoes, which is where the skiing in the Portland area is.  Western Washington skiing offers more variety of terrain and more steeps.  It may, or may not, make a difference to you.

post #33 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post
 

Please be aware that if skiing is a priority for you there is a substantial difference in the type of terrain available in the Seattle and Portland areas.  In my limited experience in Oregon I have found that the slopes are gentler and the variety of terrain is less on volcanoes, which is where the skiing in the Portland area is.  Western Washington skiing offers more variety of terrain and more steeps.  It may, or may not, make a difference to you.


That is indeed a consideration.

Someone suggested that I'm leaning toward the Seattle area, and that's true.  I still wanna check out the Portland area anyway, since if I like it much better, I could live with the skiing part.  Gotta be thorough!  

post #34 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skierish View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger View Post

 
Check the precipitation totals between Seattle and Portland. Portland gets a lot more rain.  It is a very cool city but a very wet one.

Look at the taxation between the two states. Washington no income tax but a fairly high sales tax. Oregon, a substantial income tax and no sales tax. Washington fits my situation better, but you should examine this.

Seattle Rain:  35"
Portland Rain:  38"

As far the tax situation goes, I'm one who figures state and local governments all have pretty similar needs when it comes to funding their operations, so they will get that funding one way or another.  Some states do it differently than others, but I don't believe the overall tax burden varies significantly from most states to others.  According to the Tax Foundation, overall state and local tax burdens are..
Washington:  9.4% of average state income
Oregon:  10.1% of average state income
Idaho is 9.5% 
Quote:
Originally Posted by vickieh View Post

I looked only at closer-in housing ... where my maximum weekday commute would be about 30 minutes to downtown. You can find $300-400K housing that close in. I haven't looked at Gresham prices, but it wouldn't surprise me if that area was $100K cheaper.


I can't help with "progressive vibe, vibrant". I don't know what that means to you, or what it would feel like to me if I was in it. If "progressive vibe" is 1000 microbrews, 1000 wines, lots of bikes, ratty-looking beards, and getting to watch someone shoot up in a laundromat, Portland is your town.

Snip

Hmmm, progressive vibe...I know what it's not.  It's not a plethora of camouflaged jacked-up pick-ups and even cars all about, it's not bible-thumpers constantly banging on your door at all hours wanting to save you...even outside of town, it's not the 2nd-reddest state in the nation by representation, it's not government separatists looking for armed camp sites to hold off the gumm'int during the coming race war/gun-grab war/tyrant-"Obummer" inspired insurrection, etc., it's not a place with an outsized population of blatant bigots (this area was the location of "The Order" back in the day and a lot of that outlook still lingers), it's not a place where the surrounding woods sound like gun-nut war zones on the weekends...much less hunting season!  

Snip

 There's also the issue of better accessibility to a wider variety of health care and amenities.  I couldn't get a 2nd neuro opinion, for example, in Spokane/CDA, because no other neuros were accepting patient consults!


So, this description is of Spokane and CdA? How long have you been there? Just curious.
post #35 of 44

Pretty sure he means Idaho.

post #36 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

So, this description is of Spokane and CdA? How long have you been there? Just curious.

 

No, no, Sib, I was describing rural north Idaho.

I mentioned the lack of a 2nd Neuro just as an example of the paucity of medical care options...even in Spokane/CDA an hour or more away.  

Locally, it's just Family Practices and an Ortho practice.  Also, that was just an example.  

A different sort of example would be that I had to get a TV recently.  That's a trip to CDA.  Lot o' little annoyances like that.

post #37 of 44
That surprises me, as I think of Spokane as bigger than Kalispell and I know there are multiple neuro guys in Kalispell. And multiple cardio guys. And orthopedists galore.
post #38 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by ToroAzul View Post

Cost of living is only going to get worse with the hamburger flippers getting $15/hr. Watching the dominoes fall (unintended consequences) will be very interesting in Seattle over the next few years.
God I hate poor people
post #39 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

That surprises me, as I think of Spokane as bigger than Kalispell and I know there are multiple neuro guys in Kalispell. And multiple cardio guys. And orthopedists galore.


There are several Neuros.  The 2 others I found on my insurance were not taking new patients.  They said they would have their techs run diagnostic tests and send the results to my original Nuero, but that kinda defeats the purpose of the 2nd opinion, since he had the same tests!

 

Besides, that's just an example of the shortage of convenience I'm talking about...although a fairly consequential one at the time, and that's gonna come up again.  Shopping for anything beyond the basics requires a trip to Spokane/CDA.  I know people throughout the country live with the same hassle daily throughout their lives, I just prefer not to.  Honestly, if it weren't for a lot of the other things I mentioned, I still might anyway.  It's a big picture thing, Sib.   

post #40 of 44

Based on what you've said, yes, Portland would satisfy your needs better than where you are.  The conveniences, the tolerant co-existence ... yeah, it's here.

 

Skiing ... Portland offers the local places on Mt Hood.  I can't speak to the skiing there because I have only been here for bad seasons.  I plan to ski at Bachelor more than Mt Hood.  That's a 3-hour drive.  I'd leave, say, Friday evening, and ski Saturday and Sunday.  The best route - the eastern route - would take me right past Mt Hood.  So, an hour to Hood, then 2 more to Bend. The western route feels longer and takes you through areas where, I swear, Sasquatch could live.  If Bachelor will be on your rotation, the eastern part may be better for you.

 

The urban part of Portland is the Pearl District - condos, walk to bars, restaurants, shopping.  As soon as you leave that, it feels more like in-town than in-city.  In-town, you'll be able to walk to some things too.  Then it begins to fade into more of a suburban feel.  But even where I am - zip 97230 - I have a convenience store (Plaid Pantry), bar, restaurant, public/dog park just down the street.

 

Portland is divided into quadrants ... and there are five of them:

 

  • NE - flat, wider streets, a little more open feel, streets are on a grid so it's easy to navigate.  I moved here from the DC area - lived in Maryland - and was used to coming home from work and being able to get on my bike and ride 10 miles r/t on a paved trail that was relatively flat.  It was good for mind and body exercise.  I felt I could do that in many areas on the streets of the neighborhood without having to deal with too much traffic.
  • SE - used to be "the" place to be in Portland.  Has fallen out of favor, looks/feels to be on the decline.  I feel a little claustrophic there - streets are narrower, but you do find curbs and on-street parking.  My type of bike riding would not be so easy in SE.  And I wouldn't do it after dark.  SE has some questionable neighborhoods.
  • SW - I do not understand what people like about close-in SW Portland.  It's hilly, has winding streets, no curbs, no sidewalks.  Co-workers said it feels "more private".  Ok, but I couldn't do my leisurely bike riding and would have nowhere to walk with my dog.  I think there are places farther out in SW that would be nice, but it was outside of my commute range.
  • NW - I don't know anything about this area.  Maybe it's too expensive or too far, based on my criteria.
  • North - from what I have read, this was the hub of the African-American community.  You can see the remnants of that.  It was much like NE Portland in that it's flat, has a grid system.  North Portland seems to be resisting commerce, so life is not quite as convenient as it is in NE.  I would probably have been going back to NE for any extensive shopping - but that's a matter of a few minutes' drive.  Housing is much like NE, but is cheaper.  I really liked the area around the university and that is, of course, more expensive, but still within your stated range.

 

One comment you may hear about Portland it that there are pockets. It's true. You can't pick an area and know that the whole area is good, or bad, or anything.  One pocket is fine; a couple of blocks over, not so fine.

 

Since we're talking about Gresham also ... if you look at the area around 181st Ave out to 223rd Ave (Fairview), it appears to me there's a lot of newer development going on.  A lot of commerce to begin with, but new housing also.  I was driving around a couple of weeks ago and found myself in an area of newer houses on parcels of land (vs small lots) that was within a mile or two of the much more commercial area.  So if you're looking for a more rural setting but close to a city, that may be available too.  (I may be able to find this area on a map, but was wandering my way back home and got slightly lost.  Hey, it's a grid, how lost could I get!  It was actually out in the area where the grid starts to break down.  Oops.)

 

Another area that might be interesting to look into - Oregon City.  It's just south and east of Portland, is a little more rural, but near the conveniences of Clackamas (has one of the larger malls, etc in the area).  In that same region is Lake Oswego, which I understand is really nice and is a gated community.  I've never been there - people said the main drawback is that there's only one way in/out to head toward Portland and that would make my commute a nightmare.

 

If you decide to check out Portland and are here during a weekend, I can try to help you get your bearings if I'm around.

post #41 of 44
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by vickieh View Post
 

One comment you may hear about Portland it that there are pockets. It's true. You can't pick an area and know that the whole area is good, or bad, or anything.  One pocket is fine; a couple of blocks over, not so fine.

 

If you decide to check out Portland and are here during a weekend, I can try to help you get your bearings if I'm around.

 

Dallas is like that.  Growing up, I had lived in cities that were more concentric with it being more sedate the further out you got...more or less.

 

Aside from the mostly wealthy far N. Dallas (a panhandle sticking up from the rest of the city), Dallas has an odd zoning that results in commercial next to wealthy, islands of gentrification surrounded by urban decay gangland, gov't housing projects near trendy condo developments, and any other demographic combo in close proximity you could think of.  It's odd, but it's that hodge-podge mix of everything that made me enjoy working there...if not living in Texas.

 

Thanks for the offer, too!

post #42 of 44
Vancouver, WA is another option. The eastern part is just across the river from me - can see it from my neighborhood.

Younger people have said it's boring, that you have to come to Portland for entertainment. I think people moved there when the commute wasn't bad. They got more house for their money. Now they fight the commute.
post #43 of 44
Hood River is a really nice, athletic town and it's not very far from Portland.
post #44 of 44

As we were driving back through Everett from Whistler last night I started wondering if there was maybe stuff going on there that I didn't know about, so I asked my husband if he knew people that lived there and if there were any hip neighborhoods or anything interesting. He said yeah, he had coworkers that lived there, and you would find hipper neighborhoods in Tacoma than you would ever find in Everett, that all you'd find is the mall and a bunch of fast food joints. It is true that while a lot of people talk about a renaissance in Tacoma, no one says that about Everett. I don't think Everett even would want that, as a Navy town. Cheap housing and malls are probably all they need.

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