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Good ski to compliment Blizzard Magnum 7.6 on East Coast

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

I've been skiing a pair of magnum 7.6 170's for a couple of years now mostly in Maine and have loved them...most of the time. The conditions where and when I ski seem to be mostly hard and icy with some crud and the magnums excel under these conditions (at least for me). I love that they feel super stable on hard pack and even ice and I don't think I've ever owned a ski that turned as quickly, and that's really what I'm into now, tight, fast turns.

 

However, on those days when a lot of wet snow falls I have a really hard time (especially when it gets all mounded up in the late morning and afternoon). I feel like the tails of the magnums keep getting caught up and prevent me from executing the kinds of turns I'd like to and as a result I end up going faster and sitting farther back than I'd like. 

 

I've pretty much always owned skiis that had this same problem (K2-4's, Salomon X-Screams) and it never really occurred to me that it might be the skiis holding me back in these conditions until I saw how my brother's Wateas handled.

 

So I guess what I'm looking for is a ski for the afternoons and after heavy wet snowfalls when there's nothing but ice and thick piles built up.

 

Any suggestions?

post #2 of 19

If you have a chance to demo, start with skis like the Dynastar Powertrack 89 or Fischer Ranger 88  and see how you like them.

 

If you don't have a chance to demo, try to get a session with an instructor before you buy anything.

post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
I've always wanted to learn to ski bumps better, just have so little on mountain time.

Been skiing for 25 years now, and never had a pair of skis I loved till the magnums. Wondering what else I might be missing and whether I've just always been on skis unsuitable for certain conditions and just chalked it up to technique. My confidence improved so dramatically the first full day I skied those blizzards that I really had to wonder whether I had been on the wrong equipment all those years.
post #4 of 19
New / better gear changes your subjective performance more than your objective performance. (Not that there's anything wrong with having a better time!) Boots possibly the one exception. Good bump skiers ski bumps well on ... whatever. That said, something softer and more pivoty can sometimes feel good. What is your height and weight and where do you ski?
post #5 of 19

Some rocker definitely helps in those conditions.  However technique is a big part of it too.  I always struggled in the spring until I learned how to not pivot the top of my turns.  When the skis are on top of the snow you can pivot as much as you like, when they're in the snow it's a lot harder.

 

So carving longer radius turns is one approach and the other is to learn to release and unweight the skis before reengaging them.

 

My Soul 7's do really well in that kind of snow.  I think most skis with turned up tips and tails will help you.

post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the replies so far!

I'm 6 feet 170lb.

Ski a lot at sugarloaf and Sunday river, little sunapee, loon, ragged.

Used to go all out on really long skis (pre shaped skis being common) when I was 17 but have gotten more conservative over the years what with the kid and age and no longer being invincible.

If it helps y'all any, when I'm in thick stuff I feel a lot of pressure in my ankles (normally I'm not even aware of any of my joints). I get the sensation of being bogged down like I was trying to pull a booted foot out of knee deep mud. It was definitely worse with my old, heavy salomon x-screams in 176cm. The blizzards are so snappy that I can pretty much turn my way out of anything but they are not very comfortable to ski in anything deep or thick.

Granted these conditions don't happen every day but I'd like to have an option to tackle the heavy days.
post #7 of 19

Lot's of great skis out there, as said above you need to demo something with a waist in the upper 80's. You'll find they do pretty good in the deeper snow.

 

You may even want to try the NRGY100 or a few other skis in that range. You might be surprised how easy they are to ski.

 

I have friends that ski 98 or 100mm waist skis most day's.

 

FWIW,I like to keep at least 15mm or so difference between the skis in my quiver.

 

Have fun shopping.

post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by qroberts View Post

Thanks for the replies so far!

I'm 6 feet 170lb.

Ski a lot at sugarloaf and Sunday river, little sunapee, loon, ragged.

Used to go all out on really long skis (pre shaped skis being common) when I was 17 but have gotten more conservative over the years what with the kid and age and no longer being invincible.

If it helps y'all any, when I'm in thick stuff I feel a lot of pressure in my ankles (normally I'm not even aware of any of my joints). I get the sensation of being bogged down like I was trying to pull a booted foot out of knee deep mud. It was definitely worse with my old, heavy salomon x-screams in 176cm. The blizzards are so snappy that I can pretty much turn my way out of anything but they are not very comfortable to ski in anything deep or thick.

Granted these conditions don't happen every day but I'd like to have an option to tackle the heavy days.

 

You will get more targeted suggestions if you can rank your priorities in terms of what you are trying to accomplish with this second ski in your quiver. You have mentioned post-storm skied-up crud as one issue, and bumps as another issue. (My comment earlier in the thread was more in response to your mentioning bumps.) 

 

If crud management is your bigger priority you will probably be steered toward skis that are in the longer, wider, and stiffer side, with less radical rocker. For bumps, it will likely be the opposite. There is plenty of middle ground, so it is not in any way an either/or choice, but there are so many skis out there that it might help to narrow it down. In any case, at your size you will want to look at a significantly longer ski than your Magnums. And I agree with Max's implication that you certainly wouldn't want to go any narrower than 85-90mm - possibly wider, depending on the priorities mentioned above. The EpicSki darling in this category at the moment is the Fischer Motive 95. Last time I was at Sunday River, about a month ago, they had a couple pairs on demo in the on-mountain shop. I'd think you'd want to start with the 180.

post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post
 

 

You will get more targeted suggestions if you can rank your priorities in terms of what you are trying to accomplish with this second ski in your quiver. 

Yup, first things first...

 

 

So lets see, you're 6 feet, 170 pounds, eastcoast; presently on a magnum 7.6 (170 cm) and want a second pair for crud and fresh snow that will also need to be still good on icy patches, stable, but easier,  more polyvalent, playful and also nice in bumps since I 've always wanted to ski bumps better. The ski will also need to have a tail rocker or be like the tail of the motive 95 ( no rocker, present on-piste but discret in bumps and when you want it to)..

Is that it?

 

What comes to mind for the moment:

 

K2 amp rictor 90 XTI

 

Fischer Ranger 88 or 98 or motive 95 (but at your weight maybe the Ranger more???)

 

Head rev 85 or 90 (too mellow for me  but I'm 210 pounds and I'm pretty sure I would still have them at your weight...)

 

Blizzard Buschwaker ( not sure for crud but really nice in fresh snow + same as the rev 85)

 

Blizzard magnum CA 8.5  could be a really nice choice if you can find some on the net... ( I own  the ti version and guess it would be nice in carbon for you)

post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 
You hit the nail on the head.

I'm looking to be able to ski through, rather than around, heavy stuff and crud without having to kill my knees and ankles by brute forcing it. And also to handle those rare wonderful days when there's fresh powder to be had.

Really appreciate the suggestions so far.
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by qroberts View Post

You hit the nail on the head.

I'm looking to be able to ski through, rather than around, heavy stuff and crud without having to kill my knees and ankles by brute forcing it. And also to handle those rare wonderful days when there's fresh powder to be had.

Really appreciate the suggestions so far.

 

If you're set on skiing through, as distinct from up and over, that is going to limit your flex choices and, somewhat, your width choices.     Now, personally, I think skiing through is a good thing, since skis that go up and over tend also to get deflected easily.     

OTOH, if that surfy feel is something you might like let's talk skis similar to the old 4FRNT Cody

 

This part is triggering my 'lessons will help' instincts, really, really hard.

post #12 of 19


For going thru the crud with ease, easy turning in same, good edge hold, and also fun in fresh powder I suggest you demo the Rossi Experience 100. Not the 98. Can't say about moguls as I have not had mine in them. They are a blast, I wish there was more to the season!

It's good that you know exactly what you are looking for as you will think the ski was just made for you when you get on it.

post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
I'm amenable to going up and over too. Just don't like getting launched anymore. But that seems like it's really more of a technique thing.

I'm definitely planning on taking some bump lessons next year, really have no excuse not to.
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by qroberts View Post

I'm amenable to going up and over too. Just don't like getting launched anymore. But that seems like it's really more of a technique thing.

I'm definitely planning on taking some bump lessons next year, really have no excuse not to.

 

 

Yup.

post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by qroberts View Post

You hit the nail on the head.

I'm looking to be able to ski through, rather than around, heavy stuff and crud without having to kill my knees and ankles by brute forcing it. And also to handle those rare wonderful days when there's fresh powder to be had.

Really appreciate the suggestions so far.

Well not sure anymore to have hit the nail on the head cause you seem to put more emphasis on crud than I tought... And ...

For crud: stiffer, heavier and for bumps: lighter and less stiff... so it would need to be a compromise...From all my recommandations, the magnum 8.5 ca seems the best for you (and maybe the head rev?)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JW MN View Post
 


For going thru the crud with ease, easy turning in same, good edge hold, and also fun in fresh powder I suggest you demo the Rossi Experience 100. Not the 98. Can't say about moguls as I have not had mine in them. They are a blast, I wish there was more to the season!

It's good that you know exactly what you are looking for as you will think the ski was just made for you when you get on it.

In bumps? I dought the 100 is THAT different from the 98...

post #16 of 19

In bumps? I dought the 100 is THAT different from the 98...

 

It is a completely different ski. It is softer, 1 layer of metal instead of the 2 in the 98.  Given the construction differences, it would have to be different in bumps than the 98. Still, it is not a bump ski and it is not a thin waist ice carver, but it sure is an impressive big mountain ski.

post #17 of 19

Only one layer? I'll have to try them next season...:-)

post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogsie View Post
 

Only one layer? I'll have to try them next season...:-)

 

Wait - don't you have at least one more week of snow?

post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

 

Wait - don't you have at least one more week of snow?

Up to mid-may if everything is good...:-)

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