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Vail Resorts buys Perisher [in Australia]

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
Rob Katz announced today Vail Resorts is purchasing Perisher in Australia.

No financials in the announcement and no changes in operation currently anticipated.

He said Australia is a major source of business for North American ski resorts.
post #2 of 24
Smart move. Perhaps it'll divert some of the Whistler crowd to VR Noth American destinations.

Mike
post #3 of 24

The price was $US132m

 

Imo the epicpass is a lot more palatable than the mountain collective. It'll be good for tourism too.

post #4 of 24

Perisher charges crazy lift ticket rates.  They will fit right in with Vail's portfolio. 

post #5 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by veteran View Post

The price was $US132m

Probably used the money they saved from underpaying instructors. wink.gif

Couldn't resist...
post #6 of 24

That's an interesting development.  Including Perisher in the epicpass mix is likely to prompt a change in destination for a lot of NSW skiers for the northern winter.  Mind you, exchange rates also impact on people's decision making and Niseko (and other Japanese resorts) are big destinations.

 

In fact our skiing friends (Thredbo people for the most part) head in all sorts of directions.  I know of one person from the office who took the family to Whistler in late January, but three others went to Japan (Myoko Kogen, Shiga Kogen, Nozawa Onsen, Furano and Niseko).  Friends of ours went to Silver Star and Big White, while we headed to Europe with two other groups of friends - skiing a week with each across the fortnight of our trip.  

 

Still, it'll be interesting to see the effect on people's decision making.  I'll be curious to see how it might impact development in the Perisher Blue areas.

post #7 of 24
post #8 of 24

Its news, that's for sure. 

post #9 of 24

Mod note: related threads were merged

post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinbad7 View Post

That's an interesting development.  Including Perisher in the epicpass mix is likely to prompt a change in destination for a lot of NSW skiers for the northern winter.  Mind you, exchange rates also impact on people's decision making and Niseko (and other Japanese resorts) are big destinations.

In fact our skiing friends (Thredbo people for the most part) head in all sorts of directions.  I know of one person from the office who took the family to Whistler in late January, but three others went to Japan (Myoko Kogen, Shiga Kogen, Nozawa Onsen, Furano and Niseko).  Friends of ours went to Silver Star and Big White, while we headed to Europe with two other groups of friends - skiing a week with each across the fortnight of our trip.  

Still, it'll be interesting to see the effect on people's decision making.  I'll be curious to see how it might impact development in the Perisher Blue areas.

It will be interesting to see what happens with the fall in the Australian dollar v USD. Over the past 5 or so years the US has been a very attractive destination, but Canada and Japan are going to be better now for the foreseeable future.
post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duckfeet View Post

Not sure if I am posting this in the right place!?

http://www.perisher.com.au/media-room/latest-press-releases/567-vail-resorts-to-aquire-perisher.html

 

 

"World class"?  Jeez!  I'll have to get my buns over there one day for a proper look.

post #12 of 24

Crikey!

post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by veteran View Post

 

Imo the epicpass is a lot more palatable than the mountain collective. It'll be good for tourism too.


Definitely a matter of perspective.

For me, the destination options with MC are far superior to EPIC.

post #14 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeedToSki View Post
 


Definitely a matter of perspective.

For me, the destination options with MC are far superior to EPIC.


Yep, but the value proposition is different.  You only get 2 free days at each resort (3 at one you designate).  The EPIC pass breaks even at about 5 days, making the weeklong destination skier more of a target.

 

So, MCP for the ski addict willing to go to several destinations, EPIC for the destination skier.  And with a bit of overlap to the ski addict.

 

I suspect that EPIC is outselling MCP by (at least) an order of magnitude.

 

Mike

post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by habacomike View Post


Yep, but the value proposition is different.  You only get 2 free days at each resort (3 at one you designate).  The EPIC pass breaks even at about 5 days, making the weeklong destination skier more of a target.

So, MCP for the ski addict willing to go to several destinations, EPIC for the destination skier.  And with a bit of overlap to the ski addict.

I suspect that EPIC is outselling MCP by (at least) an order of magnitude.

Mike

Given the close proximity of many EPIC resorts to one another, I would think it would provide more value to the local skier as well imo.
post #16 of 24


Yep, it also benefits the local, but it also draws them in by providing destination resorts for them to visit.  Particularly the midwest resorts.  I wouldn't be surprised in the least if Vail acquired resorts in the east.

 

Mike

post #17 of 24

From the Australian point of view, I would think the fact that a few designation resorts in Europe and Japan are included.  For 2014-15 those perks were:

 

  • up to 5 consecutive days when staying at in-resort lodging at both Verbier (must book directly by the agency or hotel), Switzerland and Les 3 Vallees, France.
  • 5 consecutive days at Niseko United, Japan.
post #18 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by habacomike View Post

Smart move. Perhaps it'll divert some of the Whistler crowd to VR Noth American destinations.

Mike


As of May 4, those Australians who want to travel to Whistler have another alternative to consider.  Thredbo was added to the Mountain Collective Pass for the 2015-16 season.

post #19 of 24
But the MCP doesn't really work for the Aussie crowd. If you live in Australia, you can buy an Epic pass and ski Perisher all winter then head to the U.S. for summer holidays. A MCP only gets you 3 days at one resort before you have to pay half price. It seems MCP is targeting North Americans who might be interested in a couple of days in Australia.

It does point out the real issue with the MCP -- it's an add on to regular skiing for most folk as opposed to the baseline product.

Mike
post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by habacomike View Post

But the MCP doesn't really work for the Aussie crowd. If you live in Australia, you can buy an Epic pass and ski Perisher all winter then head to the U.S. for summer holidays. A MCP only gets you 3 days at one resort before you have to pay half price. It seems MCP is targeting North Americans who might be interested in a couple of days in Australia.

It does point out the real issue with the MCP -- it's an add on to regular skiing for most folk as opposed to the baseline product.

Mike


Agree that the MCP makes more sense for someone who lives in North America than Australia.  But depends on the bucket list.  Know of a small group of Aussies who had a very good time driving around to MCP destinations the past season.  Skied at Aspen, Alta/Snowbird, JH, Squaw/Alpine . . . mostly just two days each.  Pretty extreme amount of driving for sure.  But clearly the MCP was the incentive for the trip.

 

A clarification, only get 2 days per destination included with the MCP.  There is a bonus 3rd day at one pre-selected destination for those who buy relatively early, usually before the summer.  Additional days 50%, no black out dates.  For those who live in the flatlands and do not have a big mountain season pass, the MCP can be tempting.

post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post


Agree that the MCP makes more sense for someone who lives in North America than Australia.  But depends on the bucket list.  Know of a small group of Aussies who had a very good time driving around to MCP destinations the past season.  Skied at Aspen, Alta/Snowbird, JH, Squaw/Alpine . . . mostly just two days each.  Pretty extreme amount of driving for sure.  But clearly the MCP was the incentive for the trip.

A clarification, only get 2 days per destination included with the MCP.  There is a bonus 3rd day at one pre-selected destination for those who buy relatively early, usually before the summer.  Additional days 50%, no black out dates.  For those who live in the flatlands and do not have a big mountain season pass, the MCP can be tempting.

For those of us not in the big mountain area though you need a lot of travel time available to make the MCP make sense imo. Contrary, I get my $ worth out of an EPIC or Epic local pass in one trip with several areas available for that one trip.
post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coach13 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post


Agree that the MCP makes more sense for someone who lives in North America than Australia.  But depends on the bucket list.  Know of a small group of Aussies who had a very good time driving around to MCP destinations the past season.  Skied at Aspen, Alta/Snowbird, JH, Squaw/Alpine . . . mostly just two days each.  Pretty extreme amount of driving for sure.  But clearly the MCP was the incentive for the trip.

A clarification, only get 2 days per destination included with the MCP.  There is a bonus 3rd day at one pre-selected destination for those who buy relatively early, usually before the summer.  Additional days 50%, no black out dates.  For those who live in the flatlands and do not have a big mountain season pass, the MCP can be tempting.

For those of us not in the big mountain area though you need a lot of travel time available to make the MCP make sense imo. Contrary, I get my $ worth out of an EPIC or Epic local pass in one trip with several areas available for that one trip.


No question there are less costly ways to ski in the Rockies than the MCP.  I know of plenty of folks in the southeast who don't consider flying anywhere but Denver.  But if someone really wants to ski at Aspen or JH or Alta/Snowbird for a few days and can plan two ski trips (min 4 days skiing each), the MCP fits the bill.  A parent who is going to take a family ski vacation to an MCP destination, plus an adults-only trip at another time, might find the $99/kid MCP a better choice.  Different strokes for different folks.

post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coach13 View Post


For those of us not in the big mountain area though you need a lot of travel time available to make the MCP make sense imo. Contrary, I get my $ worth out of an EPIC or Epic local pass in one trip with several areas available for that one trip.

 

There are some specific cases that make sense even with just a single trip though, if the place you were going to go anyway happens to be on the MCP.

 

For instance, if you were going to do 5 days at Aspen during peak season, and got 3 free days + 2 at 50% off with the MCP, you come out (a little) ahead compared to buying a regular 5 day lift ticket. 

post #24 of 24

Saw this explanation of the purchase rationale:

 

As Ski Passes Go Global, Who's Chasing Winter?

 

"When Vail Resorts made the announcement earlier this spring about acquiring Perisher, CEO Rob Katz explained the rationale: 1 million Aussies travel abroad to ski. Vail Resorts hopes to cash in on that 1 million and up the numbers visiting the U.S. with the lure of the Epic Pass. For skiers from down under, the pass means unlimited free skiing at the 12 U.S. ski resorts next winter after the Perisher sale closes."

 

http://www.onthesnow.com/news/a/612776/as-ski-passes-go-global--who-s-chasing-winter--

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