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East coast Ski's Reccomendation

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

6'1 205

Ski on the East Coast. Mainly on Groomers but up here it can get very icy and sloppy by afternoon. I would say I am an intermediate skier. Usually stay on the blues but venture over to blacks. Want something that can handle the conditions as well as get in and out of turns easily. Looking for some ski recommendations. Thanks 

post #2 of 11

Hi there. I have similar build stats and from Boston as well and love my Rossi Experience 84's. They can really do it and have skied over 40+ days this year all over New England. 

post #3 of 11

Stockli SX has great edge hold on the worst ice and also enough sidecut to turn easily, while still being a dependable groomer cruiser for New England.

post #4 of 11

Can you give us a sense of what you've skied on, what you like already, what not? Price constraints or not? Do you like bumps? Too many good choices until you narrow it down. 

post #5 of 11

I find that groomer-oriented skiing is best done on skis in the mid-70's to mid-80's waist width.  That gives you enough width to smooth out the variations that inevitably form and still narrow enough to produce edge hold on typical New England conditions.

 

The good news is every manufacturer makes something that fits into that range.  The bad news is that (most) manufacturers make two completely different skis that fit into that range.

 

Take, for example, Rossignol.  They make the well-reviewed "experience" series -- skis that are capable of going just about anywhere.  You (generally) don't have to bring your "A game" all the time.  If you want to take it easy, they work.  If you want to charge down the hill, they work.  Bumps, groomers, spring slush, light powder, they will most likely handle anything you throw at them.  Think of them as the SUV's of the skiing world.  The catch is that they don't do anything spectacularly well.  Jack of all trades, master of none.

 

The other side of the coin are skis that are designed to make groomers fun.  Again, staying in the Rossignol line, we're looking at things like the "Pursuit" series.  They are designed to rail on groomers.  Carve a turn and get launched into the next one; repeat the whole way down the hill.  They can positively suck in anything not groomed.  Versatility and high-end groomer performance tend to be at opposite ends of the ski-design spectrum.  But if you have no intention of ever leaving the groomers...

 

One "kind" isn't necessarily any better than the other "kind".  It's a question of "how do you approach skiing"?  Is skiing a leisurely fun activity for you?  Or do you see a groomer and you just think "race track"?  Are you intrigued by the technical end of skiing and you want to really feel a carved turn?  Are you interested in someday leaving groomers and exploring the whole mountain?

 

Give us an idea of your mindset regarding skiing and then we can give you a better recommendation as to what would "fit".

post #6 of 11

Groomer = race track. I like that that thought Kevin. LOL

 

As said above lots of good skis to chose from.

 

google the skis and read reviews. See if one of them kind of pops and you can say, Hey, that's how I ski or what I feel.

 

These skis all ski well, its more about how they feel on "your" feet.

 

Your boots do fit well, right ? the boots are the most important part.

post #7 of 11

My advice is google Realskiers and go to their website. For about $20 they will give you a list of top skis in different catagories with short reviews. Best $20 you will spend. Once you have narrowed it down, if you want more depth, come back here and do some searches or ask more questions. 

 

For what you describe, you want the front side carver catagory. You also might want to look more at the finesse category, rather than the power category.

post #8 of 11

Ummm, guys, I notice that this is a poster with one post who, furthermore, has self-classified as an intermediate.    With no pretensions to 'advanced', let alone the 'e' word.     Unusual, to say the least, yeh?

 I think we should consider the possibility that the OP does not have sufficient experience in how to give us a lot more specifically useful information.    I think we should also consider the possibility that the OP doesn't really find generic-audience reviews useful, in a "all skis sound good to great in reviews and where does one start to read between the lines?" way. 

 

 

Dissecting the original post, we see someone 6'1" 205  who does mainly groomers.    

I read this to mean "doesn't do well in bumps"

 

"venture over to blacks" - I read this as Okemo or Stratton type black trails

 

"it can get icy and sloppy by afternoon"  - I read this as these are the conditions the OP wants most help with so we can probably set the "racetrack" type skis off to one side for now. 

 

"as well as get in and out of turns easily"- this, on its face, tends also to argue against "racetrack" type skis, particularly the part about getting out of turns easily.    

 Of course the fact that OP is sophisticated enough to know that turn release is a vital part of skiing is interesting in itself.    If this was April 1, I'd be smelling something here...


Edited by cantunamunch - 3/31/15 at 1:45pm
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by bttocs View Post
 

My advice is google Realskiers and go to their website. For about $20 they will give you a list of top skis in different catagories with short reviews. Best $20 you will spend. Once you have narrowed it down, if you want more depth, come back here and do some searches or ask more questions. 

 

For what you describe, you want the front side carver catagory. You also might want to look more at the finesse category, rather than the power category.


Second that motion.  Once you have access to reviews and stats from the last dozen or so years, look for a ski between 65 and 76 mm waist width, turn radius of 13 to 17 m, suitable for experts and beginners, with a wide speed range (works well at slow and fast speeds).  Lots of them out there.  Further advice?  If you want to learn how to carve beautiful pure turns, look for a ski with full camber. 


Edited by Ghost - 3/31/15 at 4:08pm
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

Ummm, guys, I notice that this is a poster with one post who, furthermore, has self-classified as an intermediate.    With no pretensions to 'advanced', let alone the 'e' word.     Unusual, to say the least, yeh?

 I think we should consider the possibility that the OP does not have sufficient experience in how to give us a lot more specifically useful information.    I think we should also consider the possibility that the OP doesn't really find generic-audience reviews useful, in a "all skis sound good to great in reviews and where does one start to read between the lines?" way. 

 

 

Dissecting the original post, we see someone 6'1" 205  who does mainly groomers.    

I read this to mean "doesn't do well in bumps"

 

"venture over to blacks" - I read this as Okemo or Stratton type black trails

 

"it can get icy and sloppy by afternoon"  - I read this as these are the conditions the OP wants most help with so we can probably set the "racetrack" type skis off to one side for now. 

 

"as well as get in and out of turns easily"- this, on its face, tends also to argue against "racetrack" type skis, particularly the part about getting out of turns easily.    

 Of course the fact that OP is sophisticated enough to know that turn release is a vital part of skiing is interesting in itself.    If this was April 1, I'd be smelling something here...

 

These "what skis should I get" posts inevitably turn into everybody nominating their favorite ski.  The first two posts -- Rossi Experience 85 and Stockli Laser SX -- are wildly different in terms of their feel, the input you need to put into them, etc.  Neither is a "bad" ski, both work well on groomers, but the only thing similar between them is that they both look like skis.

 

Which was the basis of my post -- how does the OP approach skiing?  Some of the more "carver" oriented skis -- perhaps that was a better term than my original "racetrack" comment -- are friendlier to those with intermediate-level carving skills, but if you're not interested in learning how to really carve, they're not the most appropriate thing.

 

I maintain that groomer-oriented ski suggestions need to first and foremost take into account the mindset of the skier.  I like skis that really hook up and pull me into a turn, others don't.  Others still might be trying to find that sensation.

post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
 

 

These "what skis should I get" posts inevitably turn into everybody nominating their favorite ski.  

 

 

 

I suggest Blizzard Spur cause Ireally like the look of that ski... And after boston 122 have found out that it is not a ski for him, I will buy it from him...

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