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Josh Foster's new site - Page 2

post #31 of 57
Josh,
I've been a huge fan of your vids the past couple of seasons... a ton of gems in there an all in 'Everyman' speak. Good work! Would be interesting to know if your vids have increased demand for upper level lessons at your hill. Thoughts? Thanks in advance!

Mark
post #32 of 57


For LiquidFeet  (I'm a guy.)

post #33 of 57

Thank you, SMJ.  

post #34 of 57
Thread Starter 

Here's some pretty ugly sounding snow:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZpIhB9dyaLc

post #35 of 57

Hi Mark, 

 

Good question.  I would say yes but not in huge numbers.  We have however experienced a notable increase in visitors from certain markets where the show is more popular, they're usually in lessons too but I'd say they're predominantly intermediates.

 

Josh

post #36 of 57

Probably received a few comments like, "Hey, when does Josh ski?  Can we ski with him???!!"  ;)

post #37 of 57

Gunnerbob, the answers are everyday and yes. ;)

post #38 of 57

CB,

every resort should have a ss director as dedicated and positive as you...   rock on.   :yahoo:

post #39 of 57
I've been going through these videos as time permits. They are really well done. I think they could serve as a great resource for both instructors and learning skiers. He really does a good job emphasizing the subtle points of sound skiing imo.
post #40 of 57
Thread Starter 

As time permits is a key word. There are so many of JF's ski tips scattered over the internet, it would take a while to watch them all.

I would hesitate to guess how many there are in total. I believe that JF's intention was to round them all up and have them available on his site. That would be no small task in itself.

post #41 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac View Post

As time permits is a key word. There are so many of JF's ski tips scattered over the internet, it would take a while to watch them all.
I would hesitate to guess how many there are in total. I believe that JF's intention was to round them all up and have them available on his site. That would be no small task in itself.

I've been saving the links to a favorites folder and labeling them so I can go back to them easily.
post #42 of 57
Thread Starter 

Besides YouTube, there are a bunch of them on Snowsportsculture and Mpora. There is a new one on snowsportsculture.com that I haven't seen anywhere else yet:  http://snowsportsculture.com/ski-tips-with-josh-foster-raise-your-heals-as-you-crest-the-bump/

There's also a retro one of Rob Butler on there that's pretty cool.

post #43 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac View Post
 

Besides YouTube, there are a bunch of them on Snowsportsculture and Mpora. There is a new one on snowsportsculture.com that I haven't seen anywhere else yet:  http://snowsportsculture.com/ski-tips-with-josh-foster-raise-your-heals-as-you-crest-the-bump/

There's also a retro one of Rob Butler on there that's pretty cool.


I've got all the Rob Butler videos I can find in a folder.

Are there more of the very old ones online besides this one?

post #44 of 57
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 


I've got all the Rob Butler videos I can find in a folder.

Are there more of the very old ones online besides this one?


I remember watching a lot of Rob Butler's personal performance tips on TV years ago. But that may have very well been before the days of the internet, or at least when it wasn't as popular as it is now. I haven't run across any of his older stuff on YouTube, but you've got to figure that some of that footage has got to be around somewhere. But I'd like to be able to find some of them, I remember there being a lot of good stuff. And come to think of it, it may not have been all that long ago, I remember RB skiing on a blue pair of the Salomon Prolink skis because I had a pair of those. That was right before the transition to shaped skis. I think after that, he was skiing on a pair of Salomon Axendos, or something like that. So maybe not as long ago as I thought.

post #45 of 57

You can still see a lot of Rob's tips on the show web site.  www.snowsportsculture.com 

post #46 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac View Post
 

Besides YouTube, there are a bunch of them on Snowsportsculture and Mpora. There is a new one on snowsportsculture.com that I haven't seen anywhere else yet:  http://snowsportsculture.com/ski-tips-with-josh-foster-raise-your-heals-as-you-crest-the-bump/

There's also a retro one of Rob Butler on there that's pretty cool.


I like what he's doing, but not how he describes it.  If one is already back on their heels, they'll find his movement impossible.  What he's actually doing (shown well at about 2:18) is pulling both feet back.  This is the only way to lighten the heels to lift them as he describes.  If he'd said to pull the feet back, this would be much more clear to many more skiers.  Pulling the feet back brings the tips down to the snow as wellas re-centering the skier.  Rule of thumb--if the tips are on the snow you have an opportunity at control; if the tips are in the air you don't.

post #47 of 57

Josh Foster's videos:

First time in bumps:  How does a skier, anxious at best, identify if their shoulders are over their knees?  I'd say, "stay balanced on the balls of your feet."  But, I always say that.  Yes, hands easy in front. I don't like "strong stance."  I like "fluid balanced stance."  To many, strength implies rigidity. 

 

Lost art of steering:  Lost?  Art?  Anyway, he isn't steering.  He can't be.  He'd be breaking the law.  Newton's Third Law of Motion..."When one body exerts a force on a second body, the second body simultaneously exerts a force equal in magnitude and opposite in direction on the first body."  To turn his feet left, he'd need to anchor against something.  When skiing that would be the body which would turn right to a lesser extent due to its greater mass.  We call that countering.  And vice versa the other direction.  If the skis turn and the body stays square to the skis, he's clearly edging so the skis turn him.  A good thing, but not what he's claiming to demonstrate.

 

Edging Tactics:  I though Big Whiteout was famous for its fog--too close to the lake.  I've skied there in 3-chair fogs, when you have a hard time seeing 3 chairs up the lift.  Anyway, back to Big Flat and edging.  What's he telling us?...set our turn radius according to the circumstances?...OK.

 

Rhythm & Balance:  Pop & Turn with Lots of Extension are just too much work.  Why not use the same absorption turns he wants us to use in the bumps?  Quicker and less work.  Smear at the end...works in 4" of fresh snow.  Not as well in deeper stuff, a good way to trip yourself and go splat.  This is where edging really works well.  Edge both skis and bank the skis through the turn in the snow much like an airplane banks to make a turn in the sky.  The skis don't need to get up and out of the snow.  They can stay down in the snow, they just need to flatten to release from one turn, then edge into the next turn.  Flatten them when the knees are pulled up just like he does in bumps, then extend and edge the other way.

 

Keep your feet moving:  Yes, ski with your feet.  Other body parts amplify what the feet do.  Foggy--I just got some Oakley Rose Prizm (sic) goggles, and they're the best I've used yet in flat light.  His wiggle & scissor drills are probably OK to help a skier learn balance.

 

Skiing chopped or broken snow:  Crud is fun!  Yes to the narrow stance for a platform.  Lots of energy in the legs and big hops are just tiring and wearing on the knees.  Back to the retraction turns, quicker and less work, and edging the skis to slice through the crud.  Note how often the camera sees the bottoms if his skis--that's edging.  Steering gets the skis bounced around.  Edging slices through the lumps of crud.

 

Reference Point:  Middle of the downhill ski--YES!  How do you know when you're in the middle?...when you're balanced on the balls of your feet, mainly on the outside foot.  2:12 is a good shot of how he's edging so his skis slice through this snow.  I'd like his inside shoulder/arm/hand higher and more forward. 

 

Pro-active stance:  Frozen crud--yuck.  Yes, keeping balanced is the only way to have anything work right.  He's describing the Skier's Paradox--the skier must be very aggressive to have the control to ski as slowly as they want.  Get forward, get balanced, really be aggressive with the snow in order to go with the speed and control you like.  Again, no way for the skier to tell when their collar bones are over their skis.  Balanced on the balls of their feet is something the skier can tell for themselves.  Shins against the boot tongues isn't a goal but an indicator of how far I've pulled my skis behind me and how I'm balancing my center of mass over the sweet spots of the skis.

 

Strength in the stance:  I'd call it fluidity.  Again, many would equate strength with rigidity.  And, finding the fluid point is much easier when one is on the balls of their feet.

 

Lines, turn shape, vision:  Look as far down the slope as possible.  Very important.  Don't look at the bump you're on, look 2 or 3 ahead with just peripheral vision on the one you're on.  Don't look at the trees, look through the gaps between the trees.  Look at the tree, hit the tree.  Look through the gap, ski through the gap.  Be balanced and ready to turn by the time your skis come through the fall line so you can turn where ever it looks good to you.

 

Adding movement:  Great demonstration of fluid movements.  He isn't turning his feet.  His skis on edge are turning him.

 

Keep your feet under you:  Good demonstration of the benefits of angulation vs. inclination.  Angulate & balance vs. incline & brace against the skis.  But--he doesn't tell the skier how to achieve it nor how to tell if the "feet are underneath."  2:12 shows some of this.

 

 

Mr. Foster is Level IV.  I'm Level Zip.  Try his way, try mine, use what works.

post #48 of 57
Thread Starter 
So what you're basically saying SSG, is that for the most part, you don't have as much of an issue with the mechanics as you do with the terminology?
post #49 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post
 

Josh Foster's videos:

First time in bumps:  How does a skier, anxious at best, identify if their shoulders are over their knees?  I'd say, "stay balanced on the balls of your feet."  But, I always say that.  Yes, hands easy in front. I don't like "strong stance."  I like "fluid balanced stance."  To many, strength implies rigidity. 

 

Lost art of steering:  Lost?  Art?  Anyway, he isn't steering.  He can't be.  He'd be breaking the law.  Newton's Third Law of Motion..."When one body exerts a force on a second body, the second body simultaneously exerts a force equal in magnitude and opposite in direction on the first body."  To turn his feet left, he'd need to anchor against something.  When skiing that would be the body which would turn right to a lesser extent due to its greater mass.  We call that countering.  And vice versa the other direction.  If the skis turn and the body stays square to the skis, he's clearly edging so the skis turn him.  A good thing, but not what he's claiming to demonstrate.

 

Edging Tactics:  I though Big Whiteout was famous for its fog--too close to the lake.  I've skied there in 3-chair fogs, when you have a hard time seeing 3 chairs up the lift.  Anyway, back to Big Flat and edging.  What's he telling us?...set our turn radius according to the circumstances?...OK.

 

Rhythm & Balance:  Pop & Turn with Lots of Extension are just too much work.  Why not use the same absorption turns he wants us to use in the bumps?  Quicker and less work.  Smear at the end...works in 4" of fresh snow.  Not as well in deeper stuff, a good way to trip yourself and go splat.  This is where edging really works well.  Edge both skis and bank the skis through the turn in the snow much like an airplane banks to make a turn in the sky.  The skis don't need to get up and out of the snow.  They can stay down in the snow, they just need to flatten to release from one turn, then edge into the next turn.  Flatten them when the knees are pulled up just like he does in bumps, then extend and edge the other way.

 

Keep your feet moving:  Yes, ski with your feet.  Other body parts amplify what the feet do.  Foggy--I just got some Oakley Rose Prizm (sic) goggles, and they're the best I've used yet in flat light.  His wiggle & scissor drills are probably OK to help a skier learn balance.

 

Skiing chopped or broken snow:  Crud is fun!  Yes to the narrow stance for a platform.  Lots of energy in the legs and big hops are just tiring and wearing on the knees.  Back to the retraction turns, quicker and less work, and edging the skis to slice through the crud.  Note how often the camera sees the bottoms if his skis--that's edging.  Steering gets the skis bounced around.  Edging slices through the lumps of crud.

 

Reference Point:  Middle of the downhill ski--YES!  How do you know when you're in the middle?...when you're balanced on the balls of your feet, mainly on the outside foot.  2:12 is a good shot of how he's edging so his skis slice through this snow.  I'd like his inside shoulder/arm/hand higher and more forward. 

 

Pro-active stance:  Frozen crud--yuck.  Yes, keeping balanced is the only way to have anything work right.  He's describing the Skier's Paradox--the skier must be very aggressive to have the control to ski as slowly as they want.  Get forward, get balanced, really be aggressive with the snow in order to go with the speed and control you like.  Again, no way for the skier to tell when their collar bones are over their skis.  Balanced on the balls of their feet is something the skier can tell for themselves.  Shins against the boot tongues isn't a goal but an indicator of how far I've pulled my skis behind me and how I'm balancing my center of mass over the sweet spots of the skis.

 

Strength in the stance:  I'd call it fluidity.  Again, many would equate strength with rigidity.  And, finding the fluid point is much easier when one is on the balls of their feet.

 

Lines, turn shape, vision:  Look as far down the slope as possible.  Very important.  Don't look at the bump you're on, look 2 or 3 ahead with just peripheral vision on the one you're on.  Don't look at the trees, look through the gaps between the trees.  Look at the tree, hit the tree.  Look through the gap, ski through the gap.  Be balanced and ready to turn by the time your skis come through the fall line so you can turn where ever it looks good to you.

 

Adding movement:  Great demonstration of fluid movements.  He isn't turning his feet.  His skis on edge are turning him.

 

Keep your feet under you:  Good demonstration of the benefits of angulation vs. inclination.  Angulate & balance vs. incline & brace against the skis.  But--he doesn't tell the skier how to achieve it nor how to tell if the "feet are underneath."  2:12 shows some of this.

 

 

Mr. Foster is Level IV.  I'm Level Zip.  Try his way, try mine, use what works.

 I did actually have a response to some of these individual points but there's 30cms of new snow here today and frankly I'd rather do that.  I will however say this, if you actually open your mind and listen to the tips instead of just trying to find fault you'll probably hear me say on more than one occasion that there is more than one way to look at skiing, this is mine.  The tips I produce and the content in those tips comes from real world experience and the way it's explained in the tip netted a positive result...with quite a few different skiers.  I'm ok with the fact that my tips don't work for you, I'm ok with the notion as well that not everyone will agree with me.  But geez, quit being such a weenie about it!  It's a freakin' ski tip, if you like it great, I'm glad.  If not...meh, that's your issue. Hopefully someone else might like it.  Puffing your chest out and telling everyone what YOUR way is just reinforces the fact that you're being a weenie.  Going skiing and lighten up...you can consider that a personalized tip just for you. 

post #50 of 57
While resting today after enjoying the same snowfall you reference, Josh, I watched some of your videos again. I find your matter-of-fact, relaxed approach to be really refreshing. The lack of "bro/brah/bruh" and ego in your presentation style makes it easy to focus on what you're teaching. It's an approachable style and I guess that's why you're on tv. Some bitter wannabe isn't really worth anyone's time. Thanks for sharing your stuff online - I know you're not lacking for things to do.
post #51 of 57

Yeah good stuff from Josh.

post #52 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post


Mr. Foster is Level IV.  I'm Level Zip.  Try his way, try mine, use what works.


I'll stick with Josh.
Edited by markojp - 12/31/15 at 8:10am
post #53 of 57
I really enjoy the Josh Foster videos. I think they cover a broad range of skiing fundamentals and are presented in a manner that is not pedantic, and as a result pretty easy to understand and apply to your own skiing.

I read most of the instruction posts on Epic, but I have to admit much of it for me at least becomes way too entailed for me to walk away with an understanding as to what to apply in my own skiing. By contrast I like the concepts each Josh video covers with the demonstration and narrative.

I don't want instruction to be brain surgery but hey maybe I'm lazy that way . I think watching the Josh videos you get a nice quick tutorial you are more likely able to practice when you go skiing again and you aren't overwhelmed with minutia.

On another forum somebody was commenting on the "climbing the wall entering the bowl" Belieu (sp) video and how it was confusing. I watched that video too and had no idea what the presenter was talking about.

Glad to have Josh's stuff on the internet to enjoy. Plus I love his enthusiasm about skiing and the great promos he gives Great White. Honest, that alone motivates me to want to ski there.

We're all different and learn differently.
post #54 of 57
Thread Starter 

You can't really take these ski tips at face value, you have to read into them a little more than that. In the "Strength in your Stance" tip, it may imply a rigid stance to some, but when you actually take the time to watch and listen, it shows something just the opposite. I  have never liked the term "steering"  very much. It implies to me the use of muscular force to manipulate the skis to go in the direction that you want them to. But actually steering can be accomplished in a number of ways, including tipping to an edge and using the sidecut built into the ski to change directions. It's clear if you watch the videos that Josh uses an edge to edge transition at the start of the turn, with very little pivoting or skidding, which would be much more prevalent if muscular force was being used to turn the skis. It's not the skiing I don't like, just the terminology. I'll admit that I haven't taken any lessons in a long time, but I have used some of Josh's cues from time to time, including the "shoulders over the knees" tip, and it does work for me. Of course, if your shoulders are over your knees, you'll probably find that your hands are also in front of you, your knees are probably flexed, your shins are probably in contact with the tongue of your boot, and yes, your weight will probably be on the balls of your feet. In fact, it's hard to have one without the other, it kind of all works as a neat little package. This is only one example, there are others if you care to look for them. I personally like watching good skiing, or a good ski tip, I try to use it for motivation, it inspires me to go out and try to do better, it makes it more fun. And that's what skiing is all about for me. That's my bottom line. Anything that makes it more enjoyable, I'm all for. Anything that doesn't, not so much.

post #55 of 57
I think Josh's videos are great and always look forward to seeing the next one. These are great tips and a great reference to show people how to ski.
post #56 of 57
Demonstration team videos primarily benefit visual learners. I am blessed to be a visual learner, verbal discussion of ski technique has never been helpful to me.

What Josh does here is blurr the lines - not only does he ski world class demonstation but he talks through his points beautifully with a clear and friendly style. This is very Lito like and no serious skier should pass on Josh' s lessons IMHO.

Watch, copy and repeat... Put your boots on and "go for a slide" and get away from that keyboard !

Thanks again to Mac for the thread and Cannonball for chiming in!!!
post #57 of 57
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hrstrat57 View Post
not only does he ski world class demonstation but he talks through his points beautifully with a clear and friendly style.

 

While zipping down a bump run at the same time.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rW7X8km2YPw

 

Being able to negotiate a mogul field and give a ski lesson at the same time without missing a beat is impressive. That takes a special talent that I'll never come close to.

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