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boot shopping

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

my 10yo Salomons shattered after getting off the slope the other day.

I had a custom orthotic in them which I inadvertently tossed as well.

I'll probably have another made as they helped my flat feets alot.

 

Dunno what my local emporium will have, but I'm looking for ideas.

 

It was my first ski in a decade as well. I'm an intermediate plus.  My form is not great but I'm comfortable and confident on blue trails.

I've no interest in bumps or cliff diving.


I'm 6', 200 lbs, late 50s.  US 14 aka mondo 32.

The Salomons were mid entry, but the boots I rented to replace them were a 4 buckle modern front entry Head of some kind.

They were fine, but I did miss the orthotics.  I had better control with them in.

I ski on 170s or so.  If I continue to get a week of skiing in a year, I'd be very happy.

I hated opening and getting into the new boots, the Salos were way easier, but I'll get use to the concept.

 

Any thoughts are welcome.

post #2 of 5
You realize that shopping for boots is all about the FIT, and not the brand, the model, etc.? Shop for a BOOTFITTER, not a boot.
post #3 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by metropical View Post

 

It was my first ski in a decade as well. I'm an intermediate plus.  My form is not great but I'm comfortable and confident on blue trails.

I've no interest in bumps or cliff diving.

 

[snip]

 


I'm 6', 200 lbs, late 50s.  US 14 aka mondo 32.

The Salomons were mid entry, but the boots I rented to replace them were a 4 buckle modern front entry Head of some kind.

They were fine, but I did miss the orthotics.  I had better control with them in.

 

[snip]

 

Any thoughts are welcome.

 

 

My thoughts are as follows:

 

1) If you were able to find a rental that fit easily then you won't have much problem finding consumer boots that fit.    It doesn't, however, say much about your original boot fit if the only down side you noticed was the difficulty of getting in and out.

 

2) You are a prime candidate for not being able to tell when a modern overlap boot fits properly.     This means you are at *very* high risk for buying a boot that is entirely too big.    This happens even if you have an extremely good bootfitter, because the bootfitter can't diammetrically oppose customer feedback and stay in business both. 
 

3) The usual gameplan for regular posters to this forum is to become good enough that trail difficulty signs become irrelevant.    Irrelevant in a 'it's all fun, it's all good' way.   Icy greens, powdery blues, mogully blacks, all good.     Good in a 'let's just point and go that way and see what we find' kind of way.   If that sounds remotely like something you'd be interested in, stick around and welcome.    If not, welcome anyway, but you might get a bit bored by our never-ending din. 

 

I say this mostly because the people you will be getting advice from are  going to have trouble seeing your current ability and ski goals as an end in itself, but rather will assume that you want to progress apace just as they want to. 

post #4 of 5

Welcome to Epic.  They both said it pretty well.  I will only add that you need to read this article.  After reading that, go to the "Ask the Boot Guys" forum and read this and this.  Then check the "Who's Who" to see if there is a boot fitter listed near you.  If there is, call and make and appointment.  If not, ask here and someone will be able to recommend a boot fitter.

post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 


thanks for the links. they look helpful.

 

even though I hadn't skied in 10 years, I do realize it's all about the FIT.  I'd probably have given up skiing a long time ago otherwise. 

 

"never ending din"  .... well put.

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