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Acrophobia - Keeping Me at Good. I Want Great. - Page 3

post #61 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post
 

I don't have a fear of heights and exposure doesn't really bother me if my skis are on my feet (a switchback on a mountain bike above exposure is a different story), but add me to the list of people who have had those weird jumping sensations on the chair lift.  I didn't realize it was quite so common.

I always thought it was just me.

post #62 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by WillCO View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post

The Gondola would be worth the lift price alone. I heard the Willis tower had structural issues with it's glass viewing room. Just say'n.
I was in it 25 years ago and it's still there.

The extending glass boxes have existed since 2009. Maybe they had something else before at the Sears Tower?
Last year there were cracks in the coating over the .5 inch x 3 laminated glass. They were not structural but some people were on it when the coating cracked!

http://www.nbcchicago.com/news/local/chicago-willis-tower-sky-deck-ledge-crack-261079001.html

 

It's pretty freaky:

http://www.rantlifestyle.com/2014/03/05/30-things-chicago-die/


People do this:

 

Looking down, the glass is not as apparent as it is in a photo. When we were there, you just see below and not all the reflections. Freaky.

 

 

 

Took this chairlift, or the old version many years ago at Val d'Isere/Tignes. Goes over a mountain ridge. You definitely want a safety bar going downhill. I don't think I'd call it the world's scariest though.

 

https://youtu.be/K4JZvE5Aa-U

post #63 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

This is scary in so many ways.

Oh, the beer to loosen up is no great secret or risk.

Fear and anxiety are pretty high up the list of impairments - that's the point of this thread. Some trade offs can improve the overall balance.
post #64 of 77
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
 

The extending glass boxes have existed since 2009. Maybe they had something else before at the Sears Tower?

 

It was 1993 when I went up there.  Definitely there was an observation deck - I don't remember the glass floors, though.

 

Then again I remember less and less about things that long ago...

post #65 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

This is scary in so many ways.


What are some of the ways that is scary?

post #66 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobMc View Post
 

I always thought it was just me.

I have heard many times that is a quite common part of acrophobia; I was surprised when I learned it, but it makes sense, and it does seem to be common among many of you.

post #67 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post
 

I don't have a fear of heights and exposure doesn't really bother me if my skis are on my feet (a switchback on a mountain bike above exposure is a different story), but add me to the list of people who have had those weird jumping sensations on the chair lift.  I didn't realize it was quite so common.

 

I think Sartre wrote about it. Pretty common, I'd say. I also get that weird urge to jump, or the fear that I will jump.

post #68 of 77
Thread Starter 

^ It's probably not an actual urge to jump as much as it is our brain's envisioning of the consequences of the worst thing that could happen in that situation - which, you'd have to jump to provoke.  

post #69 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

 
I don't have a fear of heights and exposure doesn't really bother me if my skis are on my feet (a switchback on a mountain bike above exposure is a different story), but add me to the list of people who have had those weird jumping sensations on the chair lift.  I didn't realize it was quite so common.

I think Sartre wrote about it. Pretty common, I'd say. I also get that weird urge to jump, or the fear that I will jump.
Do we have a reference for the Sartre? That would be interesting.
post #70 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by WillCO View Post

^ It's probably not an actual urge to jump as much as it is our brain's envisioning of the consequences of the worst thing that could happen in that situation - which, you'd have to jump to provoke.  

No, I feel like I have to back away from open windows or I'll jump. Scared me the first time it happened. I also can't walk on the "air" side of dams, have to walk on the water side. I wouldn't even let other people walk on the air side one time. I knew I was being a loon, but the feeling was overwhelming.
post #71 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bounceswoosh View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

 
I don't have a fear of heights and exposure doesn't really bother me if my skis are on my feet (a switchback on a mountain bike above exposure is a different story), but add me to the list of people who have had those weird jumping sensations on the chair lift.  I didn't realize it was quite so common.

I think Sartre wrote about it. Pretty common, I'd say. I also get that weird urge to jump, or the fear that I will jump.
Do we have a reference for the Sartre? That would be interesting.

 

I remembered this from my Existentialism course umpteen years ago, so it's good to doubt. I may be able to dig something up in my old college books, but for now, here's what I found on google - 

 

http://reasonandmeaning.com/2014/11/20/theories-of-human-nature-chapter-18-sartre-part-1/

 

Quote:
Confronting choices leads to angst or anguish. We don’t know what we will do or what to do. We can jump off a bridge, and we could throw our child off a bridge too. When we confront our freedom it brings anxiety.
post #72 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post
 

I have heard many times that is a quite common part of acrophobia;

 

I've heard that too, but... I don't have a fear of heights.  I've climbed all kinds of stuff my entire life, and like I said, exposure doesn't really bother me.

 

I think the difference is, normally I'm in control, whereas on a chair lift I feel helpless and deep-down don't always trust the lifts (for good reason).

post #73 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post
 

 

I've heard that too, but... I don't have a fear of heights.  I've climbed all kinds of stuff my entire life, and like I said, exposure doesn't really bother me.

 

I think the difference is, normally I'm in control, whereas on a chair lift I feel helpless and deep-down don't always trust the lifts (for good reason).

The way I understood it is that it's kind of a subset of the fear of heights, or maybe a different manifestation of it. Not really a fear, but an urge (and one you should fear). I don't really know for sure. I had an irrational fear of sitting on the front row of an arena balcony. We have hockey tickets on the first row of the third level, great seats, but I will not stand up to cheer, that's for sure. 

post #74 of 77
Ive got a wife, three kids, great life, no thoughts of suicide whatsoever. But yet every once in a while I'll be driving down the highway and some weird urge to turn the wheel will come up. I'll start running through my mind what would happen in the crash.

I get the same thing on chair lifts, the strange irrational urge to jump, I have to fight myself over the higher spans. Everyone that skis with me knows I pull down the bar pretty much as soon as loading.

It's kinda liberating to hear I'm not the only one that feels that itch, although I'm still not going to ride Peruvian with the bar up, wink.gif.
post #75 of 77

This is an April 2015 quote from Extreme Skier John Egan:  “The fear of what could go wrong has always been a driving force for me. People say ‘you’re fearless’ and I don’t think so. I think I decipher and dissect what’s going on.”  “Fear is healthy. It’s good for you. It’s not good for you not to be afraid. It’s good to be confident and understand what could happen. Living in fear is not good, and letting fear run your body and your body language is not good. But understanding why you would be fearful of that avalanche — too narrow, too steep, too icy — those things will let you solve the problem so that you’ve solved the fear issue, you’re not backing away from it.”

Full article:  http://www.boston.com/sports/columnists/wilbur/2015/04/for_dan_and_john_egan_extreme_skiing_is_still_all.html?camp=twit%3Aeric&dlvrit=845873

post #76 of 77

I just looked at some amazing pics that generated an unexpected fear of heights for me as I sit right here in my very safe kitchen.  Look if you dare!  

http://www.buzzfeed.com/peggy/these-photos-will-make-your-stomach-drop#.hlMAy8yP6

Here's one.

post #77 of 77

Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) might be worth checking out. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4oGJ9CWjRQk

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