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The health of the ski instruction profession.... - Page 3

post #61 of 69

Well, my small hill paid ski pros 50% of the lesson cost for request private lessons last year. That's close enough to the rate I was getting for my real job when I was working one last year and more than what most of the big boys pay. The laws of supply and demand are more complicated than one might think.

post #62 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharpedges View Post
....

As epicski policy states, there is no longer good or bad skiing. Until there are once again visually clear standards for good skiing and instructors freeski in uniform, nothing will change much. Fact is, most current instructors are good people persons and lame skiers (even the certified ones and some examiners.)

That's not epicski policy. It's my personal philosophy that is partially shared by a few people. I do free ski in uniform. I also prefer to see all instructors on staff ski in uniform (note I don't make policy at my mountain - at which the policy is you can wear your uniform on snow if you are available to work, but you don't have to wear it when free skiing), lame or otherwise. First because it makes it easier for me to see who needs some assistance. Second because I'm not afraid to have a discussion about what ski school does well. Pick out any lame skiing instructor at my home mountain and I'll be glad to tell you about the work that that instructor does well that you wouldn't want any part of. 

 

How close do you think the PSIA "visual cues" manual comes to documenting visually clear standards for ski technique? I'd be interested in your opinion of how such standards could otherwise be defined.

post #63 of 69
"Pick out any lame skiing instructor at my home mountain and I'll be glad to tell you about the work that that instructor does well that you wouldn't want any part of."

Rusty, I think you need to come to my workplace and lead some workshops for senior management.
post #64 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by goranmilos View Post

Something is "broken" with ski instruction in the US when I am paying 18 yr. old to teach my 6 yr. old group lesson, on 400' Midwest hill, the same money that I paid former World Cup podium winner in Selva for 2 hr. private. My guess is that if dollar stays this strong to Euro, next year will see great number of skiers crossing the Atlantic.
High cost of lessons - fewer people can afford it.
Low pay for instructors - low retention rate and quality of instructions suffer.
The system is designed to benefit resort/ski school operators and their shareholders and nobody else. Smaller hills have to follow this model imposed on them or else ...
Laws of supply and demand do not function without proper competition factor involved.

You get lessons from World Cup podium winners? What were they teaching you specifically?

post #65 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich666 View Post

You get lessons from World Cup podium winners? What were they teaching you specifically?

Yes, you can do it too, all you have to do is walk into one of multiple ski schools ( you choose whichever one you like), tell them what you want (join group or private), choose time and day and pay 1/3 of what you would pay here in the US. I did not request this person in particular, he just mentioned that he skied in the US few times and it came up during one of the chair rides.
I do not want to put somebody else's name out in public, but he won two World Cup Super G races - Kvitfjell and Garmisch.
I am sure he can teach you something skiing related, he taught me how to do "pizza" and "french fries". I noticed immediate improvement and was able to comfortably ski "easier" reds. :0) And he refused tip at the end !?
But seriuosly, his family also operates hotel/B&B in town, farming in the summer and a restaurant at the bottom of one of the runs.
post #66 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by goranmilos View Post


Yes, you can do it too, all you have to do is walk into one of multiple ski schools ( you choose whichever one you like), tell them what you want (join group or private), choose time and day and pay 1/3 of what you would pay here in the US. I did not request this person in particular, he just mentioned that he skied in the US few times and it came up during one of the chair rides.
I do not want to put somebody else's name out in public, but he won two World Cup Super G races - Kvitfjell and Garmisch.
I am sure he can teach you something skiing related, he taught me how to do "pizza" and "french fries". I noticed immediate improvement and was able to comfortably ski "easier" reds. :0) And he refused tip at the end !?
But seriuosly, his family also operates hotel/B&B in town, farming in the summer and a restaurant at the bottom of one of the runs.

I can certainly appreciate that someone of that level has no issues teaching beginner stuff. Some have egos that won't allow for it but maybe also failing to realize that some of the basic fundamentals taught to beginners are also "worked on" throughout an entire racing career. I am always in awe when I watch a skier like that free ski right in front of me. Tip refusal? More evidence he is not doing it for the money.

post #67 of 69
No, not for the money, he got free season pass and a nice blue jacket. Ski school/resort kept all the money - just like here.
post #68 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by borntoski683 View Post

And really if you think about it, what rich said is true, highly trained ski instructors are antiquated and don't fit the current business model. And actually it is kind of unrealistic for resorts to expect any of us to spend the time and money from our own pockets to pursue very much training when the bar has been lowered so far in terms of compensation. Some people will do it anyway for personal enrichment or for the ego boost to say they are level x certified or perhaps to get up the priority list at their resort, but the ends don't justify the means anymore as anything other then a labor of love

Bingo! But many will continue to continue on. Most of us are creatures of habit. Why spend big money to get certified for such low pay? Many are the reasons and many have been mentioned in this thread: ego; status; etcetera. But, if one is to climb to the top of the low paying profession certification is a necessity to have a chance at earning any reasonable money. Cert 3 at my resort is necessary but most fail in pursuing it, spending a lot of time and cash. Catch 22 situation.

post #69 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimidee33 View Post
 

Bingo! But many will continue to continue on. Most of us are creatures of habit. Why spend big money to get certified for such low pay? Many are the reasons and many have been mentioned in this thread: ego; status; etcetera. But, if one is to climb to the top of the low paying profession certification is a necessity to have a chance at earning any reasonable money. Cert 3 at my resort is necessary but most fail in pursuing it, spending a lot of time and cash. Catch 22 situation.

It's a crying shame but at least somebody is cleaning up.

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