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Getting the right rental gear

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

It struck me this year that I have had the same type of rental skis since my 2nd ever ski trip, so wondering if I'm still getting the right stuff (living a minimum 6 hours journey, including a plane, from any sort of ski area makes buying skis an unappealing option, but have my own boots). 

 

I always go for the option 1 above beginners skis, and they always offer a choice of skier type 1 - 3, where I pick 2.

 

I love to ski single blacks and spend some time in double black terrain (not very good on moguls but I try). I like to ski in bowl areas and love the trees, and will go for small hikes to obviously safe powder areas, but I'm not into jumping off rocks or anything that far removed from piste skiing. Having said that I probably only spend maybe 25% of my time in this sort of terrain, more usually I am on the groomed pistes (partly because that's where my skiing friends prefer to be).

 

Not trying to big up my skiing ability in any way, but just wanting to make sure I am getting the most appropriate skis!

post #2 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiDragon View Post
 

It struck me this year that I have had the same type of rental skis since my 2nd ever ski trip, so wondering if I'm still getting the right stuff (living a minimum 6 hours journey, including a plane, from any sort of ski area makes buying skis an unappealing option, but have my own boots). 

 

I always go for the option 1 above beginners skis, and they always offer a choice of skier type 1 - 3, where I pick 2.

 

I love to ski single blacks and spend some time in double black terrain (not very good on moguls but I try). I like to ski in bowl areas and love the trees, and will go for small hikes to obviously safe powder areas, but I'm not into jumping off rocks or anything that far removed from piste skiing. Having said that I probably only spend maybe 25% of my time in this sort of terrain, more usually I am on the groomed pistes (partly because that's where my skiing friends prefer to be).

 

Not trying to big up my skiing ability in any way, but just wanting to make sure I am getting the most appropriate skis!


What region have you been skiing in?  Do you rent standard skis or demo skis?  Usually not much choice for standard rentals besides what length you prefer.

 

The selection of Skier Type has little to do with the model/brand of skis.  It's related to the setting for the bindings.

 

The closest ski area from my house is a 3 hour drive and it's tiny.  Even so, I decided to buy a pair of basic skis once I was skiing more than a few days per season so that I didn't have to deal with the rental process every time.  For trips out west, I used to rent demo skis before I bought all-mountain skis.  Always had my own boots.

post #3 of 24

Might learn something from this thread about what skis to rent for a trip out west.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/132622/advice-needed-please-demo-skis-intermediate-trip-to-snowmass

post #4 of 24

The important question that hasn't been answered is where do you ski?  The link referenced above is for renting skis in Aspen, CO which is not at all the same as renting in Vermont.

post #5 of 24

My question to the OP is your report of the the 1-above "beginner's" level are those levels based on pricing or based on the quality of skis.

 

Most shops have "demo" skis, which are more expensive to rent, but this does not mean they are skis only for experts.  There are skis that are good for the intermediate skier to try out and have more fun on the mountain on.

post #6 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiDragon View Post
 

It struck me this year that I have had the same type of rental skis since my 2nd ever ski trip, so wondering if I'm still getting the right stuff (living a minimum 6 hours journey, including a plane, from any sort of ski area makes buying skis an unappealing option, but have my own boots). 

 

I always go for the option 1 above beginners skis, and they always offer a choice of skier type 1 - 3, where I pick 2.

 

I love to ski single blacks and spend some time in double black terrain (not very good on moguls but I try). I like to ski in bowl areas and love the trees, and will go for small hikes to obviously safe powder areas, but I'm not into jumping off rocks or anything that far removed from piste skiing. Having said that I probably only spend maybe 25% of my time in this sort of terrain, more usually I am on the groomed pistes (partly because that's where my skiing friends prefer to be).

 

Not trying to big up my skiing ability in any way, but just wanting to make sure I am getting the most appropriate skis!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post
 

The important question that hasn't been answered is where do you ski?  The link referenced above is for renting skis in Aspen, CO which is not at all the same as renting in Vermont.

For what it's worth, I don't think of the northeast for skiing bowls, trees, and hiking to get "safe powder areas."  Other posts from the OP have been related to skiing in the Rockies.

post #7 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post
 

 

For what it's worth, I don't think of the northeast for skiing bowls, trees, and hiking to get "safe powder areas."  Other posts from the OP have been related to skiing in the Rockies.

whats funny is Vermont this year and most years always has good tree skiing and we have more open bowls then anywhere not in Co this year. My home resort has over 320 inches this year. 

 

 

The good news is this. No one can actually ski this because most people do not know how to actually ski especially westerns, and I  highly doubt that people are going to start flying east to ski powder even as climate change destroys the wetern snow pack for years to come.

 

post #8 of 24
3 posts... Nice, Josh! Welcome back... Sorta.... for a moment.
post #9 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

3 posts... Nice, Josh! Welcome back... Sorta.... for a moment.

 

banned in three posts ......

 

Just Amazing :eek

post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

3 posts... Nice, Josh! Welcome back... Sorta.... for a moment.

Do you really think Josh Matta would post video that he is not featured in???

 

I don't.

post #11 of 24

... or maybe that was Josh. 

post #12 of 24
Did he take grammar lessons while he was away?
post #13 of 24
Grammar? Maybe Siri got a raise.
post #14 of 24
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the replies and the link to the other thread. I will look into demo skis next time just to explore it. I have always just had the 'standard' non-beginner ones before.

 

Yes, ski in the Rockies (when in US). Also ski in Europe but generally stick to pistes there.

 

Not keen on buying skis as I have to take a taxi, train, underground, just to get to the plane in the first place, and hauling them around (plus paying for airline carriage) is no fun for the amount of time I get to spend on the snow each year.

post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiDragon View Post
 

Thanks for all the replies and the link to the other thread. I will look into demo skis next time just to explore it. I have always just had the 'standard' non-beginner ones before.

 

Yes, ski in the Rockies (when in US). Also ski in Europe but generally stick to pistes there.

 

Not keen on buying skis as I have to take a taxi, train, underground, just to get to the plane in the first place, and hauling them around (plus paying for airline carriage) is no fun for the amount of time I get to spend on the snow each year.


I think you're on the right track.  Marry your boots and date your skis.  You'll be happy with getting demo skis when you travel and will probably find your skill improving with better equipment. 

Thumbs Up

post #16 of 24

Like the girl said ^ make sure you have good fitting boots. Have you been to a boot fitter ?

 

Boots are the most important part.

 

At a type 2 skier choice, I'd be careful about getting to much air or doing moguls at any higher level than a beginner. I have a plate and 7 screws in my collar bone from per-releasing.

post #17 of 24

My first reply on this site, and i hope it helps...I think the best thing you can do is to determine how much terrain is being skied off-piste, like groomers or hard pack, woods, powder etc. Growing up in Stowe i also skied in the rain, dedicated...that way i had no surprises when hauling a** through a soft spot in the snowmaking zone at high speeds. Not used to that or wet snow? Face-plant. Injuries.  The East coast has tons of ice scattered throughout trails. The rental departments have simple questions pertaining to your ability, weight, and height, foot size. It is crucial to have the right SIZED skis and the D.I.N. setting set to your ability. So for example, if you weigh 135 to 150 lbs, and are a beginner, you'll be in the 5 to 7 range, meaning for your weight and ability, the ski will come off before it injures/twists the knees or pelvis. In perspective, i grew up racing and averaged 120+ days a year, and also later competed in freestyle. My D.I.N setting is always at an 11 or higher. With my skis on, i can swing the ski in the air and sharply drive the tip of it into the snow and with the right amount of strength, will snap the ski off. That way i know how much force it will take at that setting, and that means holding a turn through crappy snow-ice at 60+ MPH without them "pre-releasing". This was very easy to see while racing, the high force of torsional flex of the ski, and vibration puts an incredible amount of force on the only things holding you to your skis. The higher your strength, and the faster you ski, on multiple terrains all are integral to the settings on the bindings

Get a medium stiffness all-mountain ski, in a manageable length (which you'll have to determine through Demo's). Too soft of a ski and youre going to be catching edges. Too stiff of a ski, at your ability, will have the same or more instances of catching an edge. If you are having the skis tuned prior to skiing make sure the edges are dulled at the tip and tails of the skis. Super sharp is not really necessary in deep snow or medium to deep snow. The sharpness is determined by the icy-ness of the trail, or the race course requires sharpness. A sharp edge is primarily for holding up on a trail or course that has a lot of ice.

Boots: If youre a beginner or partially intermediate, the cant or forward lean on the boot will be more upright than an expert boot that has a canting that is far more aggresively forward, with narrower widths. I grew up in race boots, they were always tight, even after forming, still super tight. Which means super accurate control of the ski and turn. A roomy boot with little support is really bad, but is too common with demo boots in a rental store. Sore shins? = leaning back too far because of lack of proper forward lean. Toes and heels getting smashed? too much room in the boot. Protrusion on feet (ankle bones etc) thats just unbearable? Get them orthotically fitted, or get a heat mold at the shop for the shell of the boot. Your socks cant be bunched up at the top of the boot, there should be nothing but sock from toe to top of boot.  

If youre only skiing once in a while, and have huge gaps in between the skiing days, it is extremely difficult to get better at it and will take a long time unless youre really coordinated and are very in shape and flexible. Some people pick it up in a couple days, which also depends on your age and body style. Some people never progress. How many ski-days in a year do you get? Like anything in life, if you are driven to achieve something that you really want, you find ways to really make it happen. So, to sum it all up-  training before you ski will make you learn that much faster, because youll have the strength to go that much further, and ski harder at trying to be better. Even if your not skiing every day, stay in shape as much as possible. More importantly-probably the MOST important factor- spend time skiing with people that are far better than your ability. I've seen couples in their mid 90's- skiing gingerly down the mountain... settings, fitness and muscle memory are everything in skiing.....

Good luck, and dont give it up ! 

post #18 of 24

THis is a response to Marvolos' post- You cant compare East coast skiing to anywhere in the world, its so much different. Growing up in Stowe, I raced, competed in freestyle, and grew up skiiing from the age of 5, specifically at Mt Mansfield. So right off, i'll say very plainly, that the deepest snow ive ever skiied in was in the upper glades at Mansfield. First time my shoulders were submerged while skiing, i mean swimming basically through powder. Of course thats because i know where to find it, and where the most snow falls at Stowe. Ive also skied Granite chief at Squaw- broken Arrow, right after they opened it up after 5 days and 15 feet of snow. Broken Arrow, tons of powder. Woods off of Pallavicini  at A-basin, Copper Mountain woods and bowls, Vail, Beaver creek, winter park, Taos NM, Loveland pass, not quite as deep, wind packed deepness but not up to my neck powder.  

On the other hand, IMO (again its only my opinion from experience) theres no comparison to what Stowe has, that rivals the back bowls at Vail, or Copper Mountain, or Squaw, Taos, etc. Stowe, Sugarbush, Mad river, Jay peak, or Burke has nothing like that, except for small sections on the mountains. Stowe's hellbrook (steepest vert in VT) has nothing on the woods at Taos or A-basin or Squaw. Westerner's cant ski say, upper Profanity? I've seen clueless tourists with almost no ability following us up to the chin. We used to see maybe 3 to 5 people a day up there, now everybody thinks they know where the best lines are. The sizes of the bowls and tree areas out west are far superior to anything in the East Coast. Look at the size of land in relation to the states, and that means skiable terrain, not small open sections like Vermont. We have to search for these small open "bowl" areas in VT because of that. The West cost does hold that over us East-coaster's i think... 

post #19 of 24
^^Rental gear...rental gear...
That post does belong somewhere though. Fyi, Marvolo was a troll already banned.
post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich Larow View Post

THis is a response to Marvolos' post- You cant compare East coast skiing to anywhere in the world, its so much different. Growing up in Stowe, I raced, competed in freestyle, and grew up skiiing from the age of 5, specifically at Mt Mansfield. So right off, i'll say very plainly, that the deepest snow ive ever skiied in was in the upper glades at Mansfield. First time my shoulders were submerged while skiing, i mean swimming basically through powder. Of course thats because i know where to find it, and where the most snow falls at Stowe. Ive also skied Granite chief at Squaw- broken Arrow, right after they opened it up after 5 days and 15 feet of snow. Broken Arrow, tons of powder. Woods off of Pallavicini  at A-basin, Copper Mountain woods and bowls, Vail, Beaver creek, winter park, Taos NM, Loveland pass, not quite as deep, wind packed deepness but not up to my neck powder.  
On the other hand, IMO (again its only my opinion from experience) theres no comparison to what Stowe has, that rivals the back bowls at Vail, or Copper Mountain, or Squaw, Taos, etc. Stowe, Sugarbush, Mad river, Jay peak, or Burke has nothing like that, except for small sections on the mountains. Stowe's hellbrook (steepest vert in VT) has nothing on the woods at Taos or A-basin or Squaw. Westerner's cant ski say, upper Profanity? I've seen clueless tourists with almost no ability following us up to the chin. We used to see maybe 3 to 5 people a day up there, now everybody thinks they know where the best lines are. The sizes of the bowls and tree areas out west are far superior to anything in the East Coast. Look at the size of land in relation to the states, and that means skiable terrain, not small open sections like Vermont. We have to search for these small open "bowl" areas in VT because of that. The West cost does hold that over us East-coaster's i think... 

You know a guy named Josh? Be careful. You're going to hurt yourself with all that chest beating. And watch those personal pronouns. They tend to clog the ears. smile.gif
post #21 of 24

I'm 42, and was responding to what looked like a younger skier making a comment about Stowe. However, I do not know of any skier named Josh. Im not better than anyone else, just different. I thought this forum was about skiers, who normally talk about skiing, in different places, under different conditions, and comparing things about skiing that can be compared. Kind of like the apres ski lounge at the lodge. Still the deepest snow i found was at my mountain, and im not biased. I know where im going most of the time, but when im in an area im not familiar with, with no map, im basically clueless. No offenses intended.. we're all on the snow together at the end of the day...

post #22 of 24
Don't worry about it. You couldn't have known the background there.
post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich Larow View Post

I'm 42, and was responding to what looked like a younger skier making a comment about Stowe. However, I do not know of any skier named Josh. Im not better than anyone else, just different. I thought this forum was about skiers, who normally talk about skiing, in different places, under different conditions, and comparing things about skiing that can be compared. Kind of like the apres ski lounge at the lodge. Still the deepest snow i found was at my mountain, and im not biased. I know where im going most of the time, but when im in an area im not familiar with, with no map, im basically clueless. No offenses intended.. we're all on the snow together at the end of the day...


I really don't know if experiencing the deepest snow in your life at Stowe is very relevant to someone figuring out rental gear or even buying a daily ski for the east.

So where's this? And is it relevant? Probably not. smile.gif(Marvolo is Josh in sock puppet garb... hang around awhile. He'll be back. )


post #24 of 24

Thats cool.i was responding to "

For what it's worth, I don't think of the northeast for skiing bowls, trees, and hiking to get "safe powder areas."  Other posts from the OP have been related to skiing in the Rockies.

whats funny is Vermont this year and most years always has good tree skiing and we have more open bowls then anywhere not in Co this year. My home resort has over 320 inches this year. 

 

What i think is funny is that this was within this message thread about rentals. I'm new to this site and I got side tracked but that happens. Looks like tele poles in that pic, could be anywhere on the planet. And no, its not relevant to rentals unless you rent pictures of people skiing in- wait, swimming in snow.

Ski it like you own it-

 

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