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Wrapping up the Season

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

We're coming to the end of the road on another ski season.  I'll be around for awhile longer, but it's almost time to go into ski hibernation until next fall. I've enjoyed the conversations, discussions and even debates and look at my "initiation" into the club as "interesting". 

 

In one of my last posts I had mentioned struggling for 10 years and many many lessons. In all those years, lessons, clinics and exams not a single instructor, clinician or examiner spotted my one main problem. And simply by stumbling onto that ONE instructor that spotted the my fundamental problem, my skiing completely transformed allowing me allowing me to be the skier and instructor I am today.  To this one instructor I dedicate all my effort to helping others in my own way of "paying it forward". Overcoming that long struggle (that should not have been) is what motivates me to try to help others. 

 

I want to thank all of you here on this forum for providing so many things to think about.  You have caused me to reexamine my thoughts on just about every aspect of skiing. You have helped me to confirm many of the thoughts and concepts that I've held onto for years, helped me to modify some and broadened my perspective.  Those posting MA videos have provided wonderful examples to study, helping me think through situations and mental lesson plans and allowed me to clinic myself. You all have given me things to explore in my own skiing and I would have to say I have had a very successful ski season, skiing as technically well as I ever have (though being a few years younger wouldn't hurt).  All the knowledge I've gained from the really talented and caring instructors on this forum has helped me to develop some new approaches and themes to my lessons. And though I maintain the original concepts of skiing that I've come to understand over the past several years, you have helped me broaden them and come to an even deeper understanding of them.  And for that I thank you. 

 

Though soon going into the "standby mode" for awhile (as I'm sure many of you will also do) , I'll still peek in from time to time.  I look forward to all the future conversations well have in coming months and years. 

 

Thanks again for the stimulating conversation. 

post #2 of 22

You're most welcome Vindobona! Epic was a key piece of my homework on my road to level 3 cert. It's a great feeling when we can reach out and be THAT ONE instructor who makes a difference for another skier. It's pretty cool that Epic can help us extend our reach beyond our home mountain. But it's even cooler when offering that help helps us grow our skills too. To all the lurkers that think they aren't good enough to offer help, one sure way to get better is not worry about putting your foot in your mouth. The effort it takes to put your own experience into words leverages that experience into new knowledge. If you're not sure, then phrase it as a question.

post #3 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post
 

You're most welcome Vindobona! Epic was a key piece of my homework on my road to level 3 cert. It's a great feeling when we can reach out and be THAT ONE instructor who makes a difference for another skier. It's pretty cool that Epic can help us extend our reach beyond our home mountain. But it's even cooler when offering that help helps us grow our skills too. To all the lurkers that think they aren't good enough to offer help, one sure way to get better is not worry about putting your foot in your mouth. The effort it takes to put your own experience into words leverages that experience into new knowledge. If you're not sure, then phrase it as a question.

 

As one who asks questions and offers advice and who puts foot in mouth rather commonly, I totally affirm this advice.  

Doing all three has its perks.

post #4 of 22

Jeez...lets ot end the season yet.  I figure I have a month left, and that's without really trying.  YM

post #5 of 22

 Must be nice YM :hissyfit:

 

   zenny


Edited by zentune - 3/22/15 at 6:08pm
post #6 of 22

Great post vin.  I too had a fatal flaw that no one ever told me about, Examiners, trainers, USSA coaches. Search as I did for coaching I got a lot of information, but in my case I came to the issue in the hot tub one night, went on on the hill the next day and my skiing changed forever.  I've been building on what that one awareness/focus did for a few years now.

 

In my teaching I try to show concepts to students that were kept from me for years.  Trying to plant the seeds of advanced skiing movements in beginners.  I feel i was done a disservice that I'm trying to undo.  So paying it forward not out of gratitude for a particular coach, but to save others from having to figure it out for themselves as I did!

post #7 of 22
I switched the car top rack from ski rack to bike rack yesterday. Rode yesterday and today. My but hurts. It's all part of the grieving process. mad.gif
post #8 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

 

As one who asks questions and offers advice and who puts foot in mouth rather commonly, I totally affirm this advice.  

Doing all three has its perks.

 

Questions are often constructive not just for the asker, but for the community as a whole. We all learn from a well crafted question. And even if we "know" an answer ourselves, responses from other instructors can often expand our perspective.

 

I find there can be way too much condescension in the replies (e.g. recently I was told rolling skis on edge must be new to me :rolleyes; yeah, like 8 years ago new). Presumably fear of getting shat upon may be scaring other skilled instructors from asking questions or positing new theory. As a community, we'd be better off if we could find a way to remove passive-aggressive hostility, and respect people for raising new questions and/or airing controversial ideas.

 

As for my ski season... well, I'm back at Mont Sainte Anne for another 8 ski days, and hope to get another five or more days back home thereafter.

post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jareu View Post

I switched the car top rack from ski rack to bike rack yesterday. Rode yesterday and today. My but hurts. It's all part of the grieving process. mad.gif


Took my rack off last weekend...as much as I will enjoy getting my 2mpg's back, I'm going to miss the snow... :(

post #10 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

 

I find there can be way too much condescension in the replies (e.g. recently I was told rolling skis on edge must be new to me :rolleyes; yeah, like 8 years ago new). Presumably fear of getting shat upon may be scaring other skilled instructors from asking questions or positing new theory. As a community, we'd be better off if we could find a way to remove passive-aggressive hostility, and respect people for raising new questions and/or airing controversial ideas.

I couldn't agree more Met.  A lot is lost on the internet. There is quite a difference between challenging ideas and insults.  I welcome anyone to challenge my ideas.  If you have a good argument against something I've put out there I'm going to rethink both of our positions and I'm going to thank the challenger for making me work through the point. And if I'm right I'm going to thank him anyway because he made me reconfirm my conviction. It reminds me of an old saying...

 

"Why are you raising your voice when you should be reinforcing your argument"?  

post #11 of 22

"wrapping up the season" Ugh! What a depressing thread! This is where I start to pretend that a high end carbon full suspension 29er will go any length in recovering what has been lost.

 

Anyway some thoughts along this line: A life of skiing brings the love, honor, power, courage, fear and death that for in the end, the cost of which, if you've gone too far, will have you suffering in eternity constantly assailed with wanton craving, receiving thorough denial and fully immersed in complete spiritual degradation. Have you crossed that line? Is it too late? For some of you, yes it is. And you ... yes, YOU in particular. You knew deep down and all along that your life of skiing was an angelically beautiful experience yet otherwise dripping with blasphemously delicious satisfaction enough so to be a deadly sin. As of this notice, you are no longer expected to pretend otherwise and you are fully aware that payment for this debt is concrete in inevitability and coming due ever so gradually yet appearing with shocking immediacy. You will be flushed with endless heart wrenching pain. For now, tomorrow is another day and let's just live it up and enjoy all of this great spring skiing!  :)

post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich666 View Post

"wrapping up the season" Ugh! What a depressing thread! This is where I start to pretend that a high end carbon full suspension 29er will go any length in recovering what has been lost.

Anyway some thoughts along this line: A life of skiing brings the love, honor, power, courage, fear and death that for in the end, the cost of which, if you've gone too far, will have you suffering in eternity constantly assailed with wanton craving, receiving thorough denial and fully immersed in complete spiritual degradation. Have you crossed that line? Is it too late? For some of you, yes it is. And you ... yes, YOU in particular. You knew deep down and all along that your life of skiing was an angelically beautiful experience yet otherwise dripping with blasphemously delicious satisfaction enough so to be a deadly sin. As of this notice, you are no longer expected to pretend otherwise and you are fully aware that payment for this debt is concrete in inevitability and coming due ever so gradually yet appearing with shocking immediacy. You will be flushed with endless heart wrenching pain. For now, tomorrow is another day and let's just live it up and enjoy all of this great spring skiing!  smile.gif

To quote Samuel Clemens: "generally, the fewer the words that fully communicate or evoke the intended ideas and feelings, the more effective the communication."

And that's a wrap.biggrin.gif

My season ended suddenly Jan. 21, but Epic--AND SKIING--continue, and so can the learning and vicarious enjoyment of the sport. Stick around, Vin.
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 

 Search as I did for coaching I got a lot of information, but in my case I came to the issue in the hot tub one night, went on on the hill the next day and my skiing changed forever.

 

What was it and how did you discover it in the hot tub? Or do we really want to know? :eek

post #14 of 22

Quote:

Anyway some thoughts along this line: A life of skiing brings the love, honor, power, courage, fear and death that for in the end, the cost of which, if you've gone too far, will have you suffering in eternity constantly assailed with wanton craving, receiving thorough denial and fully immersed in complete spiritual degradation. Have you crossed that line? Is it too late? For some of you, yes it is. And you ... yes, YOU in particular. You knew deep down and all along that your life of skiing was an angelically beautiful experience yet otherwise dripping with blasphemously delicious satisfaction enough so to be a deadly sin. As of this notice, you are no longer expected to pretend otherwise and you are fully aware that payment for this debt is concrete in inevitability and coming due ever so gradually yet appearing with shocking immediacy. You will be flushed with endless heart wrenching pain. For now, tomorrow is another day and let's just live it up and enjoy all of this great spring skiing!  smile.gif

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post


To quote Samuel Clemens: "generally, the fewer the words that fully communicate or evoke the intended ideas and feelings, the more effective the communication."

And that's a wrap.biggrin.gif

My season ended suddenly Jan. 21, but Epic--AND SKIING--continue, and so can the learning and vicarious enjoyment of the sport. Stick around, Vin.

 

Kneale, how did you know that you are one of the ones I am talking about. I am looking forward to meeting but only because the red hot pitchfork will be in my hands. :)

post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 

 Search as I did for coaching I got a lot of information, but in my case I came to the issue in the hot tub one night, went on on the hill the next day and my skiing changed forever.

 

What was it and how did you discover it in the hot tub? Or do we really want to know? :eek

 

 

My fatal flaw was that in order to increase pressure to my outside ski I would bend my outside knee, moving me back! 

 

Working with ankle flexion a few years ago and I was lying in my hot tub, which is fairly small so I can sit on the seat and place my feet against the other side.  I started playing with bending knees and bending ankles.  Realizing that knee bend moved my COM back I was trying different combinations and tried just flexing my ankles while keeping my knees locked straight.  To do this I'd put my hands behind me and push my body up in the water while the ankles flexed.

 

So the next day I spent many runs basically leaning forward with locked or semi-locked knees to flex only my ankles and my skiing changed immediately.  I started playing with straightening my outside knee to increase pressure (instead of my deeply ingrained habit of flexing it) needless to say it worked.

 

From that day on I was able to get forward in a way I had never been able to before.

 

Why didn't anyone ever tell me not to bend my knee?  "Bend the knees, that will be $5 please."  

post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post


My fatal flaw was that in order to increase pressure to my outside ski I would bend my outside knee, moving me back! 

Working with ankle flexion a few years ago and I was lying in my hot tub, which is fairly small so I can sit on the seat and place my feet against the other side.  I started playing with bending knees and bending ankles.  Realizing that knee bend moved my COM back I was trying different combinations and tried just flexing my ankles while keeping my knees locked straight.  To do this I'd put my hands behind me and push my body up in the water while the ankles flexed.

So the next day I spent many runs basically leaning forward with locked or semi-locked knees to flex only my ankles and my skiing changed immediately.  I started playing with straightening my outside knee to increase pressure (instead of my deeply ingrained habit of flexing it) needless to say it worked.

From that day on I was able to get forward in a way I had never been able to before.

Why didn't anyone ever tell me not to bend my knee?  "Bend the knees, that will be $5 please."  

Interesting discovery. I have had some realizations this year. After discussing them with my coach, we agree that he has communicated these "realizations" on many different occasions. I think the information has to come at the right time for it to be effective. That is what is wonderful and frustrating about skiing. I am learning to appreciate the process as much as the result.
post #17 of 22

@skier31, I know what you mean.  Just yesterday I had a breakthrough, and the movement pattern that was such an "ah ha" moment is something that was said to me many years ago by Tom Burch, it just didn't click until I had developed other things, most notably better balance, that made it so effective.

 

However no one ever told me to extend rather than flex my outside knee to get forward and to increase pressure.  They may have said "ski taller" but that's not it.

post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

@skier31, I know what you mean.  Just yesterday I had a breakthrough, and the movement pattern that was such an "ah ha" moment is something that was said to me many years ago by Tom Burch, it just didn't click until I had developed other things, most notably better balance, that made it so effective.

However no one ever told me to extend rather than flex my outside knee to get forward and to increase pressure.  They may have said "ski taller" but that's not it.

Bob Barnes (I think) posted a great stick figure once that pointed out which joints, when flexed, have the effect of moving a skier forward or back. I think that drove the point home for me better than any verbal clue or instruction.
post #19 of 22

Thing is that what I always lacked was a coach with an eye who could look at me and tell me what was holding me back - literally.  

 

Great coaching is rare, whatever the certification level.

post #20 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

 

As one who asks questions and offers advice and who puts foot in mouth rather commonly, I totally affirm this advice.  

Doing all three has its perks.

 

Those around that remember when I started here back in 2008, know that I never really minded stating what I believed to be true but I've always been fine with being "proven" wrong.  Telling me I'm wrong is fairly useless.  It also happens to be that in 2008 is when I became a student of this sport.  I started skiing a couple years earlier, but a torn ACL got me to realize I had no idea what I was doing.  I've been studying ever since and somewhere along the way, I became an instructor & coach.  This site and these conversations have been a contributor to all of it.

 

Vin,

You might want to check in more often than you think through the off season.  It's when some of the best conversations are going.

 

Ken

post #21 of 22
Added to lessons over the last two years, nuggets of info I've gleaned from the folks here at Epic have proved very valuable. Two come immediately to mind: long leg, short leg and pull your feet back. The latter finally clicked for me this weekend at Killington. Maybe it was the challenge of such a big mountain (I ski mostly in the Poconos). It wasn't a revelation, more like I got a lot of work to do next season. Apparently I'm a slow learner...

Anyway, thanks to all for your help even if you didn't realize you were providing it!
post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by vindibona1 View Post
 

I couldn't agree more Met.  A lot is lost on the internet. There is quite a difference between challenging ideas and insults.  I welcome anyone to challenge my ideas.  If you have a good argument against something I've put out there I'm going to rethink both of our positions and I'm going to thank the challenger for making me work through the point. And if I'm right I'm going to thank him anyway because he made me reconfirm my conviction. It reminds me of an old saying...

 

"Why are you raising your voice when you should be reinforcing your argument"?  

Too many people drumming up conflict with personalizations and derogatory terms because they may not agree with a post that yet does not disrespect a person or their words.

 

I suppose that to the insecure, a simple expression of disagreement is a direct threat to the ego that must be avenged with swift determination. Ugh!

 

A popular approach seems to be passively aggressively hiding behind the guise of being in defense of someone else not asking or needing it.

 

It is probably because they need to use this venue to vent irrelevant frustrations due to lack of more healthy options.

 

Having worked in the mental health industry, I try to be empathetic to those going through hard times.

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