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How important are approved bindings?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Hi,

 

I am looking to buy a pretty cheap pair of skis preferably used.

 

One thing I have noticed is that some of the cheaper skis do not have approved bindings.

 

I will need these skis tuned.

 

How big of a deal is this?  If it is not on the 2014 list, does that really mean nobody will touch it?

 

Is it a better idea to buy a cheap, crappy pair of skis with approved bindings or a decent pair of skis with non-approved?

post #2 of 11

In my experience most shops won't touch non-indemnified bindings.  Save your self the trouble and don't buy them either.  Be patient.

post #3 of 11
Some of the shop guys will give you a better answer but since bindings that are working properly are important to skier safety from both a release and retention standpoint I'd not risk sking non-approved bindings.

I also don't think approved vs non-approved equates to expensive vs non-expensive. There are many opportunities for great deals on reliable bindings.
post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 

It seems to me as an uninformed person that bindings that are 3 to 5 years old fall off the list.  Is that correct?  I was looking at ski/binding combos from only a few years ago, and the bindings are already off.

 

If so, that seems kind of silly.

post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by jontaejones View Post
 

It seems to me as an uninformed person that bindings that are 3 to 5 years old fall off the list.  Is that correct?  I was looking at ski/binding combos from only a few years ago, and the bindings are already off.

 

If so, that seems kind of silly.


That depends on the manufacturer and the binding itself.  There are many bindings on the list that are several years old. 

post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by jontaejones View Post
 

Hi,

 

I am looking to buy a pretty cheap pair of skis preferably used.

 

One thing I have noticed is that some of the cheaper skis do not have approved bindings.

 

I will need these skis tuned.

 

How big of a deal is this?  If it is not on the 2014 list, does that really mean nobody will touch it?

 

Is it a better idea to buy a cheap, crappy pair of skis with approved bindings or a decent pair of skis with non-approved?

 

Most shops will not touch them, some might do a safety test but fail them visually. Chances are you can ski a bad ski with a  good binding before a good ski with a bad binding (since most shops won't touch them). 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jontaejones View Post
 

It seems to me as an uninformed person that bindings that are 3 to 5 years old fall off the list.  Is that correct?  I was looking at ski/binding combos from only a few years ago, and the bindings are already off.

 

If so, that seems kind of silly.

10 years is the rough estimate of when a binding comes off of the Indemnification List. 

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 

It also seems kind of cryptic to tell what is on the list.

 

Something that is like XR 11.5 is not on the list, but X 11.5 is on the list.

 

Are they the same? :(

post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

10 years is the rough estimate of when a binding comes off of the Indemnification List. 

I'd say that's true and in some cases a little longer. I've stil got a few skis with bindings in the 10-12 year range and the bindings are stil on the list.
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by jontaejones View Post
 

It also seems kind of cryptic to tell what is on the list.

 

Something that is like XR 11.5 is not on the list, but X 11.5 is on the list.

 

Are they the same? :(

A bit more info would be super helpful here, I know this is just an example, but... there is probably only one person posting on this website with any regularity that knows more about older ski bindings, and he has already posted in this thread. I have absolutely no idea what an XR 11.5 is without a manufacturer name also.  (But you answered your own question anyway, one on the indemnified list and one off the indemnified list means they are not the same. Simple.)

 

Don't buy skis with non-indemnified bindings, we are talking about alpine skiing, the cost of one lift ticket will cover the move up to more modern ski equipment. A lot has changed in the last 10 to 15 years, don't put yourself that far behind the curve by buying equipment that old. It's not worth the risk or hassle.

 

Seriously, think of the cost of one ski day, then think you could own these forever... don't waste dollars trying to save pennies.

post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post
 

 

Most shops will not touch them, some might do a safety test but fail them visually. Chances are you can ski a bad ski with a  good binding before a good ski with a bad binding (since most shops won't touch them). 

 

10 years is the rough estimate of when a binding comes off of the Indemnification List. 


Thanks.

 

So if a ski/binding set is ~3-5 years old, it should be on the list, right?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
 

A bit more info would be super helpful here, I know this is just an example, but... there is probably only one person posting on this website with any regularity that knows more about older ski bindings, and he has already posted in this thread. I have absolutely no idea what an XR 11.5 is without a manufacturer name also.  (But you answered your own question anyway, one on the indemnified list and one off the indemnified list means they are not the same. Simple.)

 

Don't buy skis with non-indemnified bindings, we are talking about alpine skiing, the cost of one lift ticket will cover the move up to more modern ski equipment. A lot has changed in the last 10 to 15 years, don't put yourself that far behind the curve by buying equipment that old. It's not worth the risk or hassle.

 

Seriously, think of the cost of one ski day, then think you could own these forever... don't waste dollars trying to save pennies.

 

It may just be my inability to read the list.

 

I asked the stores if their skis/bindings were on the list, and they said yes, so I guess they are.

 

They are definitely within 5 years old, so I guess they should be.

post #11 of 11
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